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I know many of you know the benefits of the backflush and are saying "yeah dummy glad you jumped into 2020". I am just pushing this out in hopes when the next dummy like me searches the forum, they will run across this and save time. My setup. I have a fairly stock 2005 6.0. I have changed the oil cooler twice. As you all that have done the cooler change know, it is a PITA. I changed them out of frustration and fear of unusually high oil temp. Aside: One local diesel mechanic that does a lot of Ford work and owns a 6.0 told me not to worry about high oil temp unless it approaches the de-fuel limit. Oil cooler replacement is about a 10 hour job (once you factor in getting the tools out, remembering how to do some of the more tedious things and cleanup) for me as a shade tree mechanic in my driveway. I run a Sinister Diesel bypass filter, and have done so since the first cooler change. I don't know if it does anything to tell you the truth. My deltas started really climbing lately (20 to almost 30 degrees (under a heavy load situation), but it is HOT down here in south Louisiana.). I ordered a backflush kit on ebay. I don't think it matters which one, but I would get the 45* offset water adapter as it makes adding the hose underneath the turbo outlet much easier. I rigged up an shop air from a siphon feed sandblast gun to assist the hose water pressure (I will make something more elaborate next time). Even though I was running about 100 PSI shop air, the volume was very small with this gun's design. It was enough however to knock a bunch of crud loose. There was lots of crap in the bottom of my Home Depot bucket when finished. This simple backflush (there are lots of videos on YouTube) knocked the deltas down to around 4-5* around town and 9-10* @ 70mph on the highway in 95* ambient air with 80+% humidity. The whole shooting match took about 2-3 hours. I think I can do it faster next time. Any diagnosis and repair short of replacing a part with an OEM product is a crapshoot (even then, you can get a bad OEM part.), as it may not work. However, for me a 2-3 hour try on this is going to be a go-to over the certainty of spending a weekend replacing the oil cooler. The only thing I will be careful of next time, is the adapter I bought has an o-ring that seals the water port in the top of the oil filter housing/oil cooler cover to the bottom of the adapter. Apparently, as I was placing it on the truck I got it out of alignment, and it must have slid out of place. When I took the adapter off about 1/4 of the o-ring was missing. That either fell off on the block (but I could not find it), or it is in the oil cooler. However, no ill effects as of now, as I said the deltas came way down.

FINALLY, RESPECT hot coolant. During the first oil cooler replacement, I installed Fumoto valves in the block drains to assist in coolant flush. They are the bomb. I connected some clear tubing (about 7-10' approx) to the valve, and I just coil it up and zip tie it into out of sight in the boxed portion of the frame up front when not in use. Try getting the tubing on the starter side of the motor, and you will understand why I leave it on there. So I put on some heat resistant gloves, uncoiled the tubing (which had taken a coiled "set" and would not properly straighten...something I forgot from the last drain and flush). I cracked the valve, and because the water was 190* and under up to 12 psi it caused that tubing to flail about a bit with me on a creeper under the truck. I have a nice second degree burn on my back to demonstrate that I worked on the 6.0 this weekend. In the next post, My differential issues continue I think.
 
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