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Discussion Starter #1
Hey folks im back.
this is a question im pondering because, ive seen about a thousand different examples of a “bulletproofed” truck. In my case the EGR will need to stay put, unless its an easy to remove cab on thing for cleaning. Will a tune bypass the EGR?

ive also seen Gorilla proofing, which adds in individual cylinder management, whats the added cost there?

So, is anyone has done this more recently and has a price tag I would appreciate it. Both to be professionally done, and DIY (I work in a shop, its more motivation than anything for me); rough time estimate for time too please.

Also, is there a sticky thread for a parts list?
 

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What needs to be done depends a bit on the model year. Also, a HUGE factor is if you buy new heads or not.

If I were doing this stuff again, I would buy new o-ringed heads.
 

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With new heads, an air cooled oil cooler, and three days in the shop, approaching $10 k is not unreasonable.


Not all level 3 are the same so it could be less both time and money wise. You might get an Edge monitor with fuel pressure and EGT, but not the EGT probe, or need brake work done when the truck is sent in.
 

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Oh, and we know who "gorilla proofs" and many don't really care for the guy. He seems to have good mechanics at his shop though. Anyway, you don't need any fancy "individual cylinder management" IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What needs to be done depends a bit on the model year. Also, a HUGE factor is if you buy new heads or not.

If I were doing this stuff again, I would buy new o-ringed heads.
05-07 model years, the styling and interior changes are what im after in that regard but later model years had some other improvements.
Who would you buy new heads from?
 

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Any shop that knows what they're doing can tell you if you need new heads or not. Personally, I didn't do it because they told me they were in great condition.

$6700 is what it ran me at one of the best shops in the area (North Georgia).

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
 

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05-07 model years, the styling and interior changes are what im after in that regard but later model years had some other improvements.
Who would you buy new heads from?
IMO the best are from Kill Devil Diesel.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Oh, and we know who "gorilla proofs" and many don't really care for the guy. He seems to have good mechanics at his shop though. Anyway, you don't need any fancy "individual cylinder management" IMO.
Good to know, the first ive ever heard of it is from someone I work with.
 

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Oh, and we know who "gorilla proofs" and many don't really care for the guy. He seems to have good mechanics at his shop though. Anyway, you don't need any fancy "individual cylinder management" IMO.
WTH is Gorilla proof and whom offers that service?! I have never heard that term.:ROFLMAO:
 

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Bill Hewitt, I believe.

If that's the right person I think he refers to it as "Dealer Proofing" now. (?)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
WTH is Gorilla proof and whom offers that service?! I have never heard that term.:ROFLMAO:
the way it was explained to me is its a step further than a bullet proof, adding in individual cylinder management.... what good that is idk, unless you are pushing some serious ponies.
 

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stay away from Gorilla proofs cylinder management period...

Generally speaking for the best case scenario and emissions intact...

bulletproof egr cooler
bulletproof air cooler oil cooler conversion kit (no longer need to watch deltas) still need to make sure oil temps anot above 250 in extreme cases etc
arp head studs
o ringed KDD heads
various gaskets, labor nuts, n bolts etc

more like $12-13k but.... Thats 12-13k vs spending 40k plus on a used 2014 or newer 6.7l. So if your trucvk has another 10 yrs of life transmission/body wise its well worth the investment. But if the truck already has 250k plus on the u joints, body is rusting, etc it may be worth more to invest that in a newer truck. No one can make that decision except for you. PS home owner with a shop and patienc can install the oil cooler and minor stuff but the heads, studs are not something most can do correctly without help. You may be able to save some labor hours yourself.
 
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People can't even agree on what bulletproofing is much less what can be a step further.
 
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People can't even agree on what bulletproofing is much less what can be a step further.

Meh people cant truly bulletproof is more the problem. Its a term that impies specific work... A bunch of people just throw it around to try and sell their problem child. ARP headstuds and a egr delete are not bulletproofed period. I don't think Bulletproof diesel ever trademarked anything but its a very specific as to the work before a truck is bulletproof. A truly bulletproofed 06-07 truck is really that. A studded and deleted 04 like my old f350 was not but it got by for the time I owned it.
 
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They (BPD) had a big battle with IPR research over the term in years past. I thought that they won that battle, but not 100% sure due to how long ago it was.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
stay away from Gorilla proofs cylinder management period...

Generally speaking for the best case scenario and emissions intact...

bulletproof egr cooler
bulletproof air cooler oil cooler conversion kit (no longer need to watch deltas) still need to make sure oil temps anot above 250 in extreme cases etc
arp head studs
o ringed KDD heads
various gaskets, labor nuts, n bolts etc

more like $12-13k but.... Thats 12-13k vs spending 40k plus on a used 2014 or newer 6.7l. So if your trucvk has another 10 yrs of life transmission/body wise its well worth the investment. But if the truck already has 250k plus on the u joints, body is rusting, etc it may be worth more to invest that in a newer truck. No one can make that decision except for you. PS home owner with a shop and patienc can install the oil cooler and minor stuff but the heads, studs are not something most can do correctly without help. You may be able to save some labor hours yourself.
Good to know, the heads ill definitely need help with but Ill be enlisting some help either way:LOL:

I know I can pull the cab and strip everything off of the motor at the very least.
Im actually looking at Auction for one, because for a comparable miles 7.3 its still cheaper to get a 6.0 and bulletproof it, unless I need a whole block, or a trans.
Most CO trucks don’t get too much rust unless they have dings that broke paint but thats not a big deal to me; i may totally redo my subie to include new doors, 1/4 panels, liftgate and trim, roof, hood, fenders and both upper rails. All hail damage, some repairable some not.
 

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Just plan on some good block surface prep, and I would do lifters also. Getting a low mileage truck would provide the best chance at a good cam IMO.
 

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Here is Bullet Proof Diesel's take on the bulletproofing subject. I think the term has been so over-used through time that there will never be an agreed upon street definition. It can all be very misleading to the poor guy just trying to buy a truck. In many cases, I doubt if the sellers understand it themselves. Anyway, I think BPD says that having 4 of the 5 components qualifies as "bulletproofing":


So what does it truly mean - a Bullet Proof 6.0L?

A Bullet Proof 6.0L starts with getting educated on the 5 main pattern failures that occur with this engine. These pattern failures are:

OEM Oil Cooler - The OEM oil cooler is a common source of failure. The small coolant pathways within the oil cooler can become plugged and this, in turn, can lead to failed EGR coolers as well as hot, thin engine oil. Our solution is the BulletProof Engine Oil Cooler. Learn more: BulletProof Engine Oil Cooler

OEM EGR Cooler - The OEM EGR Cooler is often blamed for being "the problem" on the 6.0L engine. While it is a common failure item, it often fails because of the plugged coolant pathways in the oil cooler. Understanding WHY this item fails is an important aspect to owning and operating one of these engines. Our solution is the BulletProof EGR Cooler. Learn more: BulletProof EGR Cooler

Fuel Injection Control Module (FICM) Power Supply - The FICM is the electronic unit that controls the injectors on the 6.0L/VT365 engine. The FICM controls the injectors by sending 48V to the injectors at precisely the right time. Over time, however, the power supply built into this module can become tired and see the output voltage drop below the specified 48V. As this voltage drops, the performance of the injectors (and therefore the entire engine) will suffer. Upgrading this power supply with the Bullet Proof Diesel version is the only long-term path to reliability. Our solution is the BulletProof FICM Power Supply. Learn more: BulletProof FICM Module

Head Studs - The 6.0L engine utilizes ten head bolts per cylinder head to affix the head to the engine. To help minimize blown head gaskets, companies such as American Racing Products (ARP) have developed head studs to replace the factory head bolts. For various engineering reasons, a head stud allows for a higher clamping force than a similar bolt does, thereby increasing the reliability by reducing the chance of a head gasket failure or stretched head bolt. We have complete head gasket kits available for you. Learn more: Complete Head Gasket Kits from Bullet Proof Diesel

The OEM Water Pump - The OEM water pump comes equipped with a plastic impeller. The pattern failure observed on this water pump is that a crack can develop within the impeller, greatly decreasing the amount of engine coolant that the pump is able to move throughout the engine. Our solution is the BulletProof Water Pump. Learn more: BulletProof Water Pump


Isn't an EGR delete and head studs the way to make a Bullet Proof 6.0?
This is a very common misconception, but the answer is NO.
First consider the EGR delete. As discussed above, the EGR cooler often fails not onto its own... that is to say, it doesn't fail "just because", rather, it fails because something else causes it to fail. That something (among other factors) is the heat that builds up within the EGR cooler because there is little to no coolant flow through the upstream oil cooler and therefore, no flow of coolant through the EGR cooler (downstream of the oil cooler). So the question really becomes - if the EGR cooler doesn't fail by itself, then what problem are you masking or ignoring by simply deleting the EGR cooler? Said another way, the failure of the EGR cooler is a sign, a symptom of other, bigger problems that need to be addressed, not ignored.
Another factor to consider with the EGR delete is that they are illegal in all fifty states. The EGR cooler is designed as part of the emissions system on the 6.0L engine. Deleting any portion of the emissions systems on a vehicle is strictly against federal law in most cases. Learn more here.
Again, a 6.0L is not a "Bullet Proof Diesel" engine unless four of the five pattern failures are addressed with genuine Bullet Proof Diesel parts. This includes the problematic OEM oil cooler as well as the FICM module, EGR cooler and water pump. Keep in mind that some businesses will promote the "Upgraded Oil Cooler" in a way to make it sound like the problems have been addressed with the original design. Click this link to learn more about the so-called "Upgraded Oil Cooler" and judge for yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Here is Bullet Proof Diesel's take on the bulletproofing subject. I think the term has been so over-used through time that there will never be an agreed upon street definition. It can all be very misleading to the poor guy just trying to buy a truck. In many cases, I doubt if the sellers understand it themselves. Anyway, I think BPD says that having 4 of the 5 components qualifies as "bulletproofing":


So what does it truly mean - a Bullet Proof 6.0L?

A Bullet Proof 6.0L starts with getting educated on the 5 main pattern failures that occur with this engine. These pattern failures are:

OEM Oil Cooler - The OEM oil cooler is a common source of failure. The small coolant pathways within the oil cooler can become plugged and this, in turn, can lead to failed EGR coolers as well as hot, thin engine oil. Our solution is the BulletProof Engine Oil Cooler. Learn more: BulletProof Engine Oil Cooler

OEM EGR Cooler - The OEM EGR Cooler is often blamed for being "the problem" on the 6.0L engine. While it is a common failure item, it often fails because of the plugged coolant pathways in the oil cooler. Understanding WHY this item fails is an important aspect to owning and operating one of these engines. Our solution is the BulletProof EGR Cooler. Learn more: BulletProof EGR Cooler

Fuel Injection Control Module (FICM) Power Supply - The FICM is the electronic unit that controls the injectors on the 6.0L/VT365 engine. The FICM controls the injectors by sending 48V to the injectors at precisely the right time. Over time, however, the power supply built into this module can become tired and see the output voltage drop below the specified 48V. As this voltage drops, the performance of the injectors (and therefore the entire engine) will suffer. Upgrading this power supply with the Bullet Proof Diesel version is the only long-term path to reliability. Our solution is the BulletProof FICM Power Supply. Learn more: BulletProof FICM Module

Head Studs - The 6.0L engine utilizes ten head bolts per cylinder head to affix the head to the engine. To help minimize blown head gaskets, companies such as American Racing Products (ARP) have developed head studs to replace the factory head bolts. For various engineering reasons, a head stud allows for a higher clamping force than a similar bolt does, thereby increasing the reliability by reducing the chance of a head gasket failure or stretched head bolt. We have complete head gasket kits available for you. Learn more: Complete Head Gasket Kits from Bullet Proof Diesel

The OEM Water Pump - The OEM water pump comes equipped with a plastic impeller. The pattern failure observed on this water pump is that a crack can develop within the impeller, greatly decreasing the amount of engine coolant that the pump is able to move throughout the engine. Our solution is the BulletProof Water Pump. Learn more: BulletProof Water Pump


Isn't an EGR delete and head studs the way to make a Bullet Proof 6.0?
This is a very common misconception, but the answer is NO.
First consider the EGR delete. As discussed above, the EGR cooler often fails not onto its own... that is to say, it doesn't fail "just because", rather, it fails because something else causes it to fail. That something (among other factors) is the heat that builds up within the EGR cooler because there is little to no coolant flow through the upstream oil cooler and therefore, no flow of coolant through the EGR cooler (downstream of the oil cooler). So the question really becomes - if the EGR cooler doesn't fail by itself, then what problem are you masking or ignoring by simply deleting the EGR cooler? Said another way, the failure of the EGR cooler is a sign, a symptom of other, bigger problems that need to be addressed, not ignored.
Another factor to consider with the EGR delete is that they are illegal in all fifty states. The EGR cooler is designed as part of the emissions system on the 6.0L engine. Deleting any portion of the emissions systems on a vehicle is strictly against federal law in most cases. Learn more here.
Again, a 6.0L is not a "Bullet Proof Diesel" engine unless four of the five pattern failures are addressed with genuine Bullet Proof Diesel parts. This includes the problematic OEM oil cooler as well as the FICM module, EGR cooler and water pump. Keep in mind that some businesses will promote the "Upgraded Oil Cooler" in a way to make it sound like the problems have been addressed with the original design. Click this link to learn more about the so-called "Upgraded Oil Cooler" and judge for yourself.
Awesome, thank you!
 

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The more BPD parts you install on your truck the better off you'll be. I have spent quite a bit of money on my truck over the last ten years, and all the BPD items I installed have been just that, bulletproof and reliable.
 
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