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I have a 2005 ford f250, that I can hear the coolant boil every time I turn it off.

What coolant is best for the 6.0 engine
I've heard of the international coolant but I just can't find it near me.
 

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I use the Green universal ELC. It's what the shop I go to uses on all their trucks. It's my understanding that it's all pretty much the same thing and made in a variety of colors nowadays.

However, if you have coolant bubbling you've got other issues.

Do you have any check engine codes?

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It really isn't "all the same" stuff in different colors.

Also, all the technical articles say that color is absolutely NOT the way to choose a coolant either.

We all know the Ford Gold caused BIG issues when it gelled up or when silicates dropped out.

The old green coolant that we used in the 7.3L and earlier had to have periodic SCA (Supplemental Coolant Additive) put in ..... to keep up the proper corrosion (and cavitation) protection. One ELC coolant is the old DexCool technology and is not compatible with our 6.0L engines.

Best bet is an EC-1 rated ELC coolant (ie a Diesel coolant). Then you need to decide on using the kind with Nitrite or the Nitrite-Free. There are different opinions on that one ......
 

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i've used cat rated ec-1 (rotella for me just because i can click a button and get it shipped to the house), and havent had a single oil cooler issue in 10yrs. water pump looked good as new when i replaced fan clutch last summer.

so between good coolant and a coolant filter, you're oil cooler will thank you
 

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Some considerations are needed with coolant and the 6.0l.

1-Never put regular universal green-It can handle the pressure and can lead to damage through cavitation.
2-Ford Gold is a risky coolant and generaly speaking is to be avoided. It gels up and clogs the coolant passages in the oil cooler which restricts the coolant in the egr cooler and this causes the reduced coolant through the egr cooler to get super hot and gel up further. Its a never ending battle. *With that being said there are REPORTS of people draining and refilling every 30-50k have success but 8 gallons of coolant is expensive.
3-Most go with ELC Rotella, Zerex, or Caterpillar are my top three. Red and sticky/sweet. There are some other SIMILAR coolants like fleet final charge and other off brands at truck stops but I personally use Caterpillar on my equipment, and used Zerex on my previous 6.0l (its harder to find in my area) so after research I found Rotella by Shell at a local farm store for $15 a gallon of concentrate. 4 gallons and 4 gallon of distilled water and this coolant is good for MANY, MANY years. I changed it after 100k miles and when I examined/tested it it didn't need to but I was already needing to drain it for other work.
 

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According to the info I'm finding online, the coolant I was referring to conforms to ASTM D3306 spec which is the same as an ELC1 CAT spec coolant.

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There is more to it than that. Ford Gold meets D3306
Interesting.. gonna need someone to break that down for me. Everyone I've ever talked to has always indicated that what I'm using is fine.

The shop that did the work is highly respected. The owner assured me that he has never had an issue with that coolant.

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Interesting.. gonna need someone to break that down for me. Everyone I've ever talked to has always indicated that what I'm using is fine.

The shop that did the work is highly respected. The owner assured me that he has never had an issue with that coolant.

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No one is really going to spend the time it takes to break it down for you. The green universal ELC flat out doesn't work. It causes damage from cavitiation, can't handle the heat flashes from the EGR long term, and more. Use it if you will but its been long established that not all coolants are the same no matter what the "bottle says" or what "your old mechanic buddy says" This is especially true for the 6.0l diesels which egr cooler heat-flashes the coolant when oil coolers are clogging. You can stick with it if you like and if its worked for you and the shop its beyond a rarity. There are always other brands coming out but few past the 6.0l test so experience, real world and many a broken down 6.0ls can attest to simply sticking with the red/sticky/sweet ELC coolant.
 

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No one is really going to spend the time it takes to break it down for you. The green universal ELC flat out doesn't work. It causes damage from cavitiation, can't handle the heat flashes from the EGR long term, and more. Use it if you will but its been long established that not all coolants are the same no matter what the "bottle says" or what "your old mechanic buddy says" This is especially true for the 6.0l diesels which egr cooler heat-flashes the coolant when oil coolers are clogging. You can stick with it if you like and if its worked for you and the shop its beyond a rarity. There are always other brands coming out but few past the 6.0l test so experience, real world and many a broken down 6.0ls can attest to simply sticking with the red/sticky/sweet ELC coolant.
I'll say it again.. been told multiple times (including on this forum) that it's basically the same so just trying to understand the difference so I can make an educated decision before I spend hundreds of dollars having the system flushed.

If you're not willing not even take a stab at explaining this then It makes me question the validity of the claim.

What is it within the coolant that causes cavitation and isn't as good with the coolant I'm using now? Is this opinion changed when the EGR has been capped off?

Thanks. Not trying to be offensive.. just to understand.

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below is a cut/paste of info that is out there in search land, hopefully answers some of the coolant questions




The following is an excerpt from a thread regarding questions that arose in the thread, where Gooch addressed those questions and issues. Keep this in mind when you see references to other people and topics that haven't been addressed in this thread.

The reason I post Gooch's response in its entirety is because I do not want to edit anything and possibly change how the information is meant to be applied.

As you can see, the info taken by and of itself is easily understandable without the "backstory" regarding the reason for the post.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Some errors and corrections...

I've been getting lots of PM's about Bob's coolant/SCA article (the sticky that was closed), and I would like to address a few things to help folks better understand. I think Bob realizes that much of his information is out-dated, pertains to certain engines other than our Powerstrokes, and is just plain wrong.

To give you a little background, first let me say that I've had extensive training and education in the field of coolants, some by the coolant manufacturers themselves. I worked with International during their cavitation crisis of the 6.9L and 7.3L IDI, helping to write bulletins, provide technical field data, and testing several different types of coolants, SCA's and mixtures thereof. I've operated and maintained a large fleet (100+ vehicles) of International/Ford 7.3L Powerstrokes. I am also a Mechanical Engineer with a background in Materials Science who has studied cavitation in cylinder walls and water pumps. Coolants are my specialty.

Where diesel cylinder cavitation is concerned, the bubbles are formed by the rapid flexing of the cylinder wall liners as the high compression, high energy diesel combustion process takes place. Much like if you filled a plastic liter pop bottle up with water and rapidly flexed the sides of the bottle back and forth with your hand. Bubbles form without any heat present. The bubbles in diesel cylinder wall cavitation don't explode, they implode due to pressure. It is this implosion against the metal surface that causes the pitting to form in the outside of the cylinder wall. Eventually the prolonged pitting become a hole. Water/coolant enters the cylinder, and thus we have engine failure (usually via hydrolock). Unlike gasoline engines, all diesel engines experience some level of inherent cavitation, some worse than others. FWIW, the Ford 6.9L and 7.9L IDI's originally had serious cavitation issues because Ford did not initially require (or add) SCA to the coolant. Ford later issued a bulletin to address that, and problems decreased dramatically.

As Bob stated, SCA's are one method of inhibiting cavitation by providing a barrier on the coolant side of the cylinder wall. However, I would like to say that it is not necessarily the SCA's displaced layer that can cause scale and coolant system plugging, but the components in the SCA itself, particularly when mixed with H2O or glycol. The use of conventional SCA is effective, but it requires testing, careful dosing, and frequent flushing. It will reduce heat transfer, and exacerbate water pump and other engine component failure.

One thing that importantly needs to be corrected, and a mistake than many misinformed people make, is that not all OAT coolants are like what GM uses. GM typically uses a "Dexcool" formulation, which is specifically not recommended for your diesel engine. Dexcool type coolants were never intended for diesel applications. There are many modern Heavy Duty Extended Life Coolants specifically designed for diesels. Delo ELC, Rotella ELC, International's Fleetrite ELC, CAT ELC, Mobil 1 ELC, and a host of others. They will address diesel cavitatation, provide superior metal corrosion protection, provide better heat transfer, require no testing and maintenance, be free of harmful abrasive silicates, borates, and phosphates, and have an operating life up to 1 million miles (Delo ELC). In fact International, who made your engine, recommends and factory-fills with these Heavy Duty Extended Life Coolants (Fleetrite ELC/Shell Rotella ELC). And in fact almost all heavy duty diesel manufacturers use Heavy Duty ELC's meeting the most strict requirements in the industry...Caterpillar's EC-1. Very little to do with GM's OAT coolant.

No where has Ford said you can not use a heavy duty ELC in your Powerstroke due to seal incompatibility. That is simply more misinformation. As we know International makes the engine and uses the HD ELC coolant, generally in more harsh, commercial applications. Seals are fine. The only coolants in the Owner's Manual Ford recommends you don't use are Dexcool and Ford's Specialty Orange. Owners and fleets have been using HD ELC successfully, and in fact with better success, for many, many years.

Another correction...Ford's Gold (G-05) coolant is nothing like a Heavy Duty ELC coolant. Thus is will not meet the more strict specs of other Heavy Duty ELC coolants, or provide the higher level of protection. The Gold is simply a universal hybrid, one-size-fits-all coolant that Ford uses in its entire line up that, with the exception of the Powerstroke, are all gasoline engines. Ford simply uses the Gold in your diesel out of convenience, simplicity, cost, and uniformity throughout it's product line and dealerships. The Gold coolant contains conventional (green coolant) components like silicate, which eventually form microscopic abrasives that eat water pump seals. It provides a lower level of cavitation protection using traditional SCA's like Nitrite, it has a shorter life, it reduces heat transfer compared to HD ELC's, and it in fact does require testing and SCA maintenance if you are an enthusiast about protecting your engine. In fact Ford recommends you add SCA to the Gold in certain F-Series applications. Caterpillar and John Deere also recommend adding SCA if it is going to be used in their diesels. Ironically, Ford's Gold will not meet International's heavy duty diesel B-1 spec. HD ELC's will. The Gold will work, but it's not the best.

For the record, adding SCA to a HD ELC will not produce anything close to "mud" or "goop". That is more misinformation. HD ELC's and SCA's are completely compatible, although not recommended only because you will lose the long-life properties of the HD ELC. There is no need to add SCA to HD ELC's. "Extenders" are available to add to HD ELC's if you want to further extend their life from the 300K, 500K, or 750K mile mark, depending on brand.

I have no intention of discrediting Bob's comments about the Evans and RMI-25, only to inform you. Evans is a good product, although expensive and hard to find. Less expensive, easier to find modern HD ELC's provide similar operating lives and similar (or better) protection. And the Evans does require modification of your cooling system to run low pressure, when your water pump seal is designed to run (and seal) under higher pressure, as documented by Ford. I have not used RMI-25 and don't plan to for reasons I won't discuss here. I would not recommend putting anything into your cooling system other than coolant and SCA.

Additionally, these days it is not appropriate to identify coolants by color. Color means nothing. A "green" coolant could be anything from a conventional, to a pre-charged, to a G-05, to an ELC. Same with red, purple, pink, gold, etc. You have to know what type of coolant it is.

There are 4 choices for your Powerstroke....

Conventional coolant (usually green) with the addition of SCA at initial fill. Frequent SCA testing and maintenance there after.

Pre-charged coolant (usually purple or pink). Comes with an initial dose of SCA. Frequent SCA testing and maintenance required thereafter.

G-05 coolants. Comes pre-charged with SCA package. Flush required at 50K miles. Semi-annual SCA testing and maintenance recommended.

Heavy Duty Extended Life Coolants. Come pre-charged with carboxylate inhibitors. No testing or maintenance. Super protection. Super long life.

Specialty coolants. Evans. Waterless, pressureless. Long life. No maintenance or testing. Expensive.

Not to be used - Dexcool, Universal coolants, All-makes-all-models, etc.

I use Chevron's Delo HD ELC. Good for 750K miles/8 years or 1M miles with addition of an extender.
 

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The information is certainly out there (thanks for the post @diablos30). Simple searches can produce a TON of information.

Also, lots of arguments over the years on the topic. That post by Gooch is a good one.
 

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If you're not willing not even take a stab at explaining this then It makes me question the validity of the claim.
Wow.... YOU came into this forum and You asked for advice.... (obviously, it got answered in entirety), but this is a bit of a rude statement.
You can use whatever coolant you want, or your mechanic recommends, nobody should have to defend an answer that is widely covered on these forums.
This is no different than "why shouldn't I buy [insert brand here], you haven't proven anything, just posted an opinion" argument..... I don't have to prove anything, do what you want, but don't ask for advice if you just want to deny /argue about the answers.

I'm just pointing out the "rudeness" in your statement..... Even if you weren't trying to be rude, it was rude.

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Wow.... YOU came into this forum and You asked for advice.... (obviously, it got answered in entirety), but this is a bit of a rude statement.
You can use whatever coolant you want, or your mechanic recommends, nobody should have to defend an answer that is widely covered on these forums.
This is no different than "why shouldn't I buy [insert brand here], you haven't proven anything, just posted an opinion" argument..... I don't have to prove anything, do what you want, but don't ask for advice if you just want to deny /argue about the answers.

I'm just pointing out the "rudeness" in your statement..... Even if you weren't trying to be rude, it was rude.

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No.. I didn't come into this forum asking for advice. Everyone needs to go back up to the top of the thread and re-read it.

All I said was that I used Green ELC and asked the OP a question and Y'all dog piled on me about the use of green coolant (which is in fact ELC and appears to be totally fine now).

I've been around these forums for some time now and it seems that there is always someone who wants to make a claim and then not stand by it, disappearing into the ether.

It's also pretty rude to say "nobody's gonna take the time to answer your question" basically, telling me that my question isn't worth a reply because this is settled already. So hey, if my comment was a bit pointed and you were offended by that then I apologize but it wasn't the first pointed have that was thrown.

Personally, I think we need to get back to the OP's question and help him figure out why he's hearing a boiling sound.

BTW.. the plan was always to swap the coolant at 75k. I'm almost there and will be changing to the CAT ELC red when I do. Some good points were made here and just to be safe (I have a lot of money in this truck) I'll make the change so I have the best in here. It doesn't bother me to spend a little more.

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The OP asked specifically what coolant is best for the 6.0L. I believe that most of the discussion meets his "charge".

I will attach a good Caterpillar article on coolant and note that on page 75, they begin the discussion on the EC-1 specification (or ASTM D6210 - NOT D3306 by itself). There are similar articles on ASTM D3306, I just don't have them anymore - after deciding it was not best for the 6.0L.

FWIW - A lot of the discussion began when the statement was made that they are all the same, just different colors. It is important for future readers to know that this is not the case.

An important point to emphasize is that not all ELC's are acceptable in our diesel engines, so just looking for the ELC (Extended Life Coolant) label is not sufficient. Specifically the DexCool coolants are not to be used - even for a short period.

Yes, the total elimination of the EGR cooler would help other coolants perform adequately in the 6.0L. I tend to believe that the "typical" green diesel coolant that we all used in our 7.3's would work fine for a period of time in an EGR cooler eliminated application ..... we would just have to routinely check the chemistry to see if we had to give it a boost of SCA's. That said, the SCA technology increases the risk of particle "drop out" and we all know what that MIGHT do to an oil cooler.

There are a number of types of engine antifreezes:
IAT (Inorganic Acid Technology) - This is the original old style antifreeze, FMC used this up through 2002 MY trucks, 2003 MY cars, usually Green in color. It requires periodic addition of "Inorganic" SCA's.

Then there are different basic types of ELC antifreezes:
OAT (Organic Acid Technology) - GM called their formulation "Dex Cool" - usually orange/red color (NOT to be used in the 6.0L).
NOAT (Nitrited Organic Acid Technology) - The ELC antifreeze/coolants use organic acids, then nitrite and/or molybdenum are added as part of their inhibitor package. The ones with Nitrite are referred to as NOAT antifreeze/coolants.

Then you have the "hybrid" coolants:
HOAT (Hybrid Organic Acid Technology) - there are a variety of these, and IIRC the Ford Gold is even a HOAT, and should not be used, unless you change it out every 45k miles AND you do not overheat it.

Of course then there are coolants based on propylene glycol instead of ethylene glycol, like Evans NPG ...... Someday I would like to try this, but you have to get ALL the water out and you can't top off with water if you have a slight leak on a trip into the less civilized areas.

The statements below are from the Ford web site for their Gold coolant:
Use only when specified. Do not use this product in systems originally equipped with any green-colored, conventional engine coolant such as Motorcraft® Premium Engine Coolant, meeting Ford Specification ESE-M97B44-A (see usage chart for exceptions), or with any orange-colored, extended-life engine coolant such as Motorcraft® Specialty Orange Engine Coolant, meeting Ford Specification WSS-M97B44-D, or with the dark green-colored Motorcraft® Specialty Green Engine Coolant, meeting Ford Specification WSS-M97B55-A. Meets the requirements of WSS-M97B51-A1 and ASTM D 3306

There is no such thing as "universal" antifreeze and color has never been standardized.

As a side note - the coolant does not have to be the "red" coolant either. Rotella makes an "ELC Ultra" that is Gold. It works quite well.
 

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As far as the boiling sound, the air may not be fully removed from the system, the coolant strength may be lower than desired, the exhaust gas (combustion temps) may be higher than normal, or maybe there is a leak in the EGR cooler. I suppose a water pump might be weak also, but you would see that in the oil and transmission fluid temperatures.
 
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