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I read the block heater on my 2006 F-250 was 1000 Watts . Plugged in 24/7 for 31 day average month per year
@17.5 cents per kilowatt hour (my cost where I live in N.E. Ky.)
That turns out to be $126 a month to leave plugged in = WOW
I don't want to risk doing harm to my injectors by thick oil from cold weather sitting outside, as it does run rough compared to plugged in , but heck that is money wasted on electricity that can go somewhere else for fun !
Did you Know this ? :nerd:
 

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Putting it on a timer works well.
 

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Do you park your truck for long periods of time? I agree a timer would get it warmed up before you drive so don't have to plug in all the time.
 

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Your South of me, I don't see the need to have the block heater plugged in this year -- yes, they are expensive to operate

A timer would work well, as others have suggested -- only need a couple of hours to have heat when you start the truck

Was 11F here yesterday and my '06 started pretty good -- the 5.9 in my tractor hit on the third compression -- neither was plugged in
 

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My total electric bill for my entire house including block heater on a timer, hot water heater, typical electric appliances, freezer and a pond pump 24/7 is south of $150 per month during the winter months. The timer switches the block heater on 3 or 4 hours before my typical start time. The other thing I'm hoping for with the timer is extended life for the block heater.

k
 

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I use a Kasa smart plug (linked Below) it hooks up to my home WiFi network and has an app on my phone. I can turn it on and off from my phone or schedule a timer to turn it on and off. It also works with my Google Home so all I have to do is say "Hey Google, Please turn n the truck" and she does it. The electric bill savings easily pays for the plug.

*edit* I also forgot is also keeps track of energy usage like a Kill-A-Watt meter and you can see those reports on your phone

https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-HS105-KIT-Required-Assistant/dp/B06WD6Q8K9/ref=sr_1_14?keywords=kasa+plug&qid=1581870019&sr=8-14
 

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I read the block heater on my 2006 F-250 was 1000 Watts . Plugged in 24/7 for 31 day average month per year
@17.5 cents per kilowatt hour (my cost where I live in N.E. Ky.)
That turns out to be $126 a month to leave plugged in = WOW
I don't want to risk doing harm to my injectors by thick oil from cold weather sitting outside, as it does run rough compared to plugged in , but heck that is money wasted on electricity that can go somewhere else for fun !
Did you Know this ? :nerd:
15.75 if you have a timer and set it for every day including weekends at 3 hours in the morning

less $ if you only set it for the days you drive

or free if you rig a hidden extension cord to your neighbors power
 

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I use a Meross smart plug. It is rated for 1200 watts, has a schedule you can set and will also do a countdown. So I have it set to shut off after 4 hours.
 

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I have mine set up on a thermostat instead of a timer. So far it's never came on. Maybe it's defective.>:)
 

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I have mine set up on a thermostat instead of a timer. So far it's never came on. Maybe it's defective.>:)
Does it ever get that cold in Florida? LoL
 

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Occasionally. I plugged it in one time when I knew it was going to get down in the upper teens. The next time that happened I didn't. She clanked and rattled a couple of seconds and smoothed out. Never bothered too much with it again. The 6.7 doesn't even flinch in that kinda weather.
 

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I picked up an Intermatic Outdoor Timers from Home Depot (HB11KD89). I set it to run 3 hours per day and just don't plug in on the weekends unless I know I'm hopping in early to go somewhere. Can't tell you what my electricity usage is, but I could calculate it someday. For $27 I figured it wouldn't take long to recover the money versus leaving it plugged in all night every day.

If you really wanted to get fancy, you could plug in a thermostatic outlet adaptor (IFC12). Turns on at 35 degrees and off at 45 degrees. That would cover both temperature and time.

T
 

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When plugged in, does the element burn continuously? I thought they turn on and off, temperature regulated. But who leaves them plugged in 24/7 hehehe? Anyhow, plug it in when you get home. Engine is already hot. Im sure it draws less current because the element doesn't have to catch up. That's what I do. I've never seen an increase in my bill from plugging in. Your just asking for fires with timers. MHO
 

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I live north of you in Ohio and I have plugged my truck in once in 6 years. Even then it was more for the novelty of it.
 

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In the 6.0L early days, a few people tried to calculate the benefit of a few hours of being plugged in. Getting the engine up-to-temperature ASAP will clearly improve your fuel economy some (no way to really know how much though). If you have cheap electricity, it was thought to be a cost savings to have those few hours of block heating (of course diesel prices were higher then as well).
 

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KW per hour and Timers

I live in Central Wisconsin where it is -8F here this morning. I use the 'Aube by Honeywell' timer on my 6.0, available on Amazon as their item number;

B001QFZ3Z0

This one offers some flexibility on set times and whether it needs to turn on due to the (3) pre-programmed/selectable temperature set points of 10F, 21F or 37F. I have mine set to turn on (as needed) at 05:00 and if I am not using it that day it will turn off at 14:00 but times are totally selectable by the user.
 

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Occasionally. I plugged it in one time when I knew it was going to get down in the upper teens. The next time that happened I didn't. She clanked and rattled a couple of seconds and smoothed out. Never bothered too much with it again. The 6.7 doesn't even flinch in that kinda weather.
I can tell you the 6.7s don't really flinch if they have good batteries and the fuel isn't gel at -30F.

My OBS 7.3 started and ran for a about 30 seconds before it started starving for fuel at that temp, but it still had summer fuel in it at that point.

Related to the post. I've never plugged in the 6.7 as it doesn't mind it. If it cold enough here to worry about it I'm more concerned about the fuel than anything.

I used to plug in the 7.3 before I put glow plugs and a new relay in it as it was at the point that almost 50F was a struggle. But since then it doesn't care what temp she's at, it'll start at the end of the WTSL.
 
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