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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)

I have researched several sites and am considering the big 3 upgrade: increased cables sizes from batt (+) to alternator; batt (-) to chassis; chassis to engine block. I will probably do "chassis to frame" also.

I am considering this because it appears at one time the factory cable (+) on the passenger side went bad. A side post terminal was jury rigged to the battery terminal (coming from the drivers side battery) in addition to the existing factory cables that were already landed on the (+) post.

The side post terminal was drilled out to fit the batt. terminal. This terminal does not fit the batt post well and is somewhat loose. Also, the factory battery post terminal was over tightened and I feel it does not make a solid connection.

I am pretty much running stock with no over sized electrical loading, although I may put 190 amp alternator on when this one goes bad.

Has anyone done this upgrade to a PSD and is it worthwhile for pretty much a stock truck??? :didimiss:Thx
 

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I know alot of people do it for high power stereo systems. My buddy has it done on his ranger. I have a 1500 watt amp in my truck and I don't have a problem running the stereo and snow plow so I doubt it does enough to suffice paying for the huge wire. Lol
 

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I just got done upgrading all my battery cables. My terminals were cracked and corroded and not making a great connection. And when i pulled the cab the second time the connector on the Pass positive terminal broke. and we just got it back together to get it running.

I was having issues with my voltage and decided it was time to get the crap out and start over.

I bought all new cables, terminals and lugs.

I ended up just extending the starter cable, its 3/0 gauge, about a foot because trying to route 3/0 gauge is PITA and the cable was already big as sh*t and in good condition.

The Negative cables come from the factory at 2/0 gauge. I didnt upgrade them, just replaced them with 2/0gauge wire, and one thing id did was cleaned up all body contacts.

The battery crossover cable is factory 1/0 gauge, and up graded that to 2/0 gauge.

I did have to cut into the factory alternator and fuse block wire to crimp on new lugs so they can attach to my new Military style battery terminals.

As far as upgrading the alternator, i built a 0gauge wire to piggy back the factory wire, and in that piggy back wire i put a 250amp fuse block (my alternator is 220amp unit from powerbastards.com).

All in all it was big task and time consuming task to get it done. Just remember to have the right tools to do the job right the first time and properly, (meaning cable crimper, large gauge wires are not fun to crimp. i have a 12ton hydraulic crimper to do the job, makes nice air tight crimps.)

But now that im done, im glad i did, for the piece of mind and expandability and knowing that everything is making a good solid connection.

Jason
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am still gathering the materials for this project. I was thinking of soldering the connectors but I noticed you crimped yours. Is there a reason you chose one method over another? I can borrow a hydraulic lug crimper from my Dad. Regards.
 

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I am still gathering the materials for this project. I was thinking of soldering the connectors but I noticed you crimped yours. Is there a reason you chose one method over another? I can borrow a hydraulic lug crimper from my Dad. Regards.
Every where i read said soldering isnt the best method. biggest thing of that was the the amount of heat it takes to heat up that thick of wire and then solder will go back in the wire creating a very hard wire instead of a flexable wire. also you need a some special solder with a flux coating.

I chose the crimping method because i had the hydraulic crimper and it created an air tight seal once the wire was in there and it a really strong connection. just be sure to use very high quality and temperature heat shrink tubing. that cheap sh*t wont work or hold up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Every where i read said soldering isnt the best method. biggest thing of that was the the amount of heat it takes to heat up that thick of wire and then solder will go back in the wire creating a very hard wire instead of a flexable wire. also you need a some special solder with a flux coating.

I chose the crimping method because i had the hydraulic crimper and it created an air tight seal once the wire was in there and it a really strong connection. just be sure to use very high quality and temperature heat shrink tubing. that cheap sh*t wont work or hold up.
jrtcbmw,
thx for the quick reply. I ordered a new alternator today and want to do the cable upgrade at the same time I do the replacement. I was looking at a marine grade heat shrink, lugs and cable from Genuinedealz.com Regards:wink[3]:
 

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