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Discussion Starter #21
Oh...... I’m let to believe you can cancel an order if it hasn’t gone into production yet? Is that true?
I assume the plant is closed for Christmas, so it shouldn’t be an issue to cancel it.
I assume the dealer I ordered from will match or beat the lower offer from it’s arch nemesis dealer across town; as the dealership I ordered from a large group of at least 5 dealerships....whereas the other is a stand alone dealer.
 

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LOL....do you really think they can MAKE you buy a truck?? Until the Purchase Order is signed there's no legal standing. Lots of fluff, no bite.
 

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Oh...... I’m let to believe you can cancel an order if it hasn’t gone into production yet? Is that true?
I assume the plant is closed for Christmas, so it shouldn’t be an issue to cancel it.
I assume the dealer I ordered from will match or beat the lower offer from it’s arch nemesis dealer across town; as the dealership I ordered from a large group of at least 5 dealerships....whereas the other is a stand alone dealer.

You don't own the truck until you close the contract, are handed the keys and you drive-off the lot. Just ask the many folks who have had "their truck" sold-out from under them to another higher paying customer.

As I mentioned earlier in this thread, the dealer most likely isn't done with you yet. I'm guessing the financial side (other than the initial purchase cost) of the transaction still needs to be finalized, additional warranties, clerical / admin costs, prep costs, etc., etc. These costs are better discussed up front while the buyer still holds the "hammer" (of the purchase). Since you are still able to rescind the transaction, you actually retain that leverage but now you need to make the dealer understand that you know you still have that power of cancellation. Vehicle popularity and current dealer allocations can either work for or against you in this scenario.

Cash deposits should be refundable in a perfect world since there wasn't a full agreement to purchase in-place but this can get sticky for obvious reasons -- it's your money and they have it. Hopefully the amount was negligible or possibly you still have time to perform some self-help by calling your bank and doing what is necessary...
 

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Discussion Starter #24
I put a $1000 down, and signed something with the negotiated price on it, but never got a copy of it.
I'm pretty sure I can get it back if needed, I'm not too worried.
As I said, I'm pretty sure they will at least match the other offer anyway. So my order will stay with them.

I negotiated a out the door price with them. So that's all I plan on paying. I won't be getting underspray, extended warranty, or anything else.
I may use Ford finance if it's the best deal available, which it seems to be from my research so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Ok the original dealer has matched the other's offer and added a bit.
So all is well : )
 

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Discussion Starter #26
is it possible to add to a order after it's submitted?
I would like to add the ultimate trailer tow camera system to get the 360 camera.
The salesman isn't sure it can be added as they sent in the order last Saturday.
 

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Word of caution here. If you don't have a hard copy in writing, you have nothing.
Just my personal experience and getting boned a couple of times myself.
 

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I spent 30 years in the car business, 5 with Ford. All I can say is I loved customers like you."Nothing in writing"? Seriously? You gave a dealer $1000 deposit and have nothing to show for it?
#1. Get something in writing, or get your deposit back.
#2. Call your local credit union and bank and get rates for financing your new car. They will quote you over the phone.
#3. How much are you putting down and what's your limit for monthly payments. You can work your financing backwards from those 2 items. Know (IN ADVANCE) what you what your payment to be and for how long you want to finance it.
Dealer financing makes more for a dealership than selling the new car and they have dozens of finance lenders to work with. FMC (Ford Motor Credit) is only one source and they will (in all probability, looking at the current market) will be offering very low interest rates (as low as 0%).
Know what your credit score is. It's VERY important, cause it determines what interest rate you'll get. If you're under 700, it's going to cost you more than a 750-800+ score.
they're are dozens of car financing rate and payment analyzers online. Do some checking and play with the rate/time and payment to figure out in advance what you want to achieve.
#4 and MOST IMPORTANT. NEVER be afraid to WALK OUT! There are literally Hundreds of dealerships you can buy your new truck from. I just bought a car in California from my home in TN, to keep at our place in Las Vegas. Saved almost $3k on a $42k list electric car from what it would have cost me in TN or NV and that's over what my wife got as a 37 year employee of the car manufacturer with an employee discount (5% under invoice). The moral? SHOP AROUND!
If you buy from a dealer not in your state, you'll not pay sales tax with the dealer. You'll pay when you register it in your home state. The dealer will provide you with the MCO or necessary paperwork and a 30 day transfer plate to get you home. Most will pick you up at the closest airport. I've bought hundreds of vehicles over the years and over a dozen were out of state. Don't worry about warranty. It's good at any dealer.
The salesman is only the first stop in buying. The guy you need to watch out for is sitting in the finance office. He's the one who makes the real profit for the dealership. He's going to sell you financing, warranties and all kinds of aftermarket/dealer installed crap
Speaking of warranty, don't fall for the aftermarket warranties the dealer will try HARD to sell you. Most aren't worth the paper they're written on. Save the $2-3000 the dealership will charge you, stick it in an interest bearing account and worry about spending it on repairs once the factory warranty expires. Fully 70% of people who fall for the extended warranty never use them. They sell or trade the car in before the factory warranty runs out. Aftermarket warranties are a HUGE profit center for dealerships. 50-70% is pure profit.
#5 Check out buying online. A new car/truck is a commodity. It's the same truck no matter where it gets delivered. Good dealerships now sell more car online than they do from people walking in cold. If a dealer in the next state can save you $1000, it's worth the drive (or flight or bus ticket) to get it. The bottom line is everything.
Do your research before you set foot inside.
#6 Lastly, every dealership does what are known as 'dealer trades'. If they don't have exactly what you want in stock (color, model, options) they do a simple computer check to find it sitting on a lot somewhere else. They'll "trade" with the other dealer or just buy it from him. Fully 90% of vehicles sold today are never "factory ordered". Dealers sell what they have in stock or can get from another dealer who has it in stock.
 

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is it possible to add to a order after it's submitted?
I would like to add the ultimate trailer tow camera system to get the 360 camera.
The salesman isn't sure it can be added as they sent in the order last Saturday.

Yes! It’s possible to do whatever you want or need to do before taking delivery. Your new truck is not rolling along on some assembly line in Michigan. The dealer is simply locating another truck from another dealer which is optioned the way you want the truck. Don’t feel like your requests are unreasonable or the time has passed to make those requests. You’re basically asking the dealer if he will allow you to spend more money on the truck—come-on! If you do reach a point where the dealer does become frustrated and tempers flare (I don't think this is possible in our universe), simply go to another dealership with your corrected list of goodies and start over! You will only be the wiser at that point.

None of us are professionals in the field of auto sales, we all make mistakes and ultimately leave a considerable amount of money on the table at the dealership. The least we can demand is the vehicle we want. The dealership won’t lose any sleep over how many times we change our minds. They expect us to make changes and most of all, they really, really want us to make changes.
 

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I spent 30 years in the car business, 5 with Ford. All I can say is I loved customers like you."Nothing in writing"? Seriously? You gave a dealer $1000 deposit and have nothing to show for it?
#1. Get something in writing, or get your deposit back.
#2. Call your local credit union and bank and get rates for financing your new car. They will quote you over the phone.
#3. How much are you putting down and what's your limit for monthly payments. You can work your financing backwards from those 2 items. Know (IN ADVANCE) what you what your payment to be and for how long you want to finance it.
Dealer financing makes more for a dealership than selling the new car and they have dozens of finance lenders to work with. FMC (Ford Motor Credit) is only one source and they will (in all probability, looking at the current market) will be offering very low interest rates (as low as 0%).
Know what your credit score is. It's VERY important, cause it determines what interest rate you'll get. If you're under 700, it's going to cost you more than a 750-800+ score.
they're are dozens of car financing rate and payment analyzers online. Do some checking and play with the rate/time and payment to figure out in advance what you want to achieve.
#4 and MOST IMPORTANT. NEVER be afraid to WALK OUT! There are literally Hundreds of dealerships you can buy your new truck from. I just bought a car in California from my home in TN, to keep at our place in Las Vegas. Saved almost $3k on a $42k list electric car from what it would have cost me in TN or NV and that's over what my wife got as a 37 year employee of the car manufacturer with an employee discount (5% under invoice). The moral? SHOP AROUND!
If you buy from a dealer not in your state, you'll not pay sales tax with the dealer. You'll pay when you register it in your home state. The dealer will provide you with the MCO or necessary paperwork and a 30 day transfer plate to get you home. Most will pick you up at the closest airport. I've bought hundreds of vehicles over the years and over a dozen were out of state. Don't worry about warranty. It's good at any dealer.
The salesman is only the first stop in buying. The guy you need to watch out for is sitting in the finance office. He's the one who makes the real profit for the dealership. He's going to sell you financing, warranties and all kinds of aftermarket/dealer installed crap
Speaking of warranty, don't fall for the aftermarket warranties the dealer will try HARD to sell you. Most aren't worth the paper they're written on. Save the $2-3000 the dealership will charge you, stick it in an interest bearing account and worry about spending it on repairs once the factory warranty expires. Fully 70% of people who fall for the extended warranty never use them. They sell or trade the car in before the factory warranty runs out. Aftermarket warranties are a HUGE profit center for dealerships. 50-70% is pure profit.
#5 Check out buying online. A new car/truck is a commodity. It's the same truck no matter where it gets delivered. Good dealerships now sell more car online than they do from people walking in cold. If a dealer in the next state can save you $1000, it's worth the drive (or flight or bus ticket) to get it. The bottom line is everything.
Do your research before you set foot inside.
#6 Lastly, every dealership does what are known as 'dealer trades'. If they don't have exactly what you want in stock (color, model, options) they do a simple computer check to find it sitting on a lot somewhere else. They'll "trade" with the other dealer or just buy it from him. Fully 90% of vehicles sold today are never "factory ordered". Dealers sell what they have in stock or can get from another dealer who has it in stock.


There's a man in the know!
 

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Seems like a fair price. I'm about to order one myself. I visited a dealership a week ago and they said they couldn't order one that day, but would get back with me. That was over a week ago. Seems pretty unusual for a truck that lists for ~ $70K. Where are you buying it? Thanks
 

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#6 Lastly, every dealership does what are known as 'dealer trades'. If they don't have exactly what you want in stock (color, model, options) they do a simple computer check to find it sitting on a lot somewhere else. They'll "trade" with the other dealer or just buy it from him. Fully 90% of vehicles sold today are never "factory ordered". Dealers sell what they have in stock or can get from another dealer who has it in stock.
The dealer is simply locating another truck from another dealer which is optioned the way you want the truck.
While these statements are factual in part, they are QUITE far from the everyday business conducted by dealers. I talked to PLENTY of dealers about transfers, NONE would openly transfer a truck unless it was the only way to make a sale happen. In fact the dealers loose the sales "credit" in the eyes of Ford for a model/trim level when it's done on dealer to dealer transfer. The statement above in bold just flat BS....



This example is not factual but an example to get across the idea: So let's use the Tremor trim level. Dealers are allocated only 5 Tremor trim level trucks. Dealer A has 5 Tremors on the lot, whereas Dealer B has none as their order quota hasn't been delivered. Dealer B calls up.."Hey transfer us a Tremor.". Dealer A says sure..no problem...they swap it for a Lariat trim from Dealer B. Dealer A goes to order a new Tremor to replace the transfer.....Ford says....WHOA there big guy you still have 5 on the lot. Ford doesn't recognize the transfer of a sale so they block the "new" Tremor order from Dealer A. Dealer A goes to Dealer B...Hey help us out...We need a Tremor.....Dealer B...Sorry...we don't transfer Tremor trucks.....LMAO....


So when you have to ask WHY has (truck/trim) sat on your lot for over a year.......^^^^^^^That's why.


My local dealer sat on a Limited for over 18 months....JUST so they wouldn't loose the "credit" of the sale of a model/trim in the eyes of Ford.


So when you order a truck.....The dealer IS IN FACT submitting a factory order......that's why it takes (XXX) weeks to get one on delivery.



Unless the dealer specifically says they are getting it on transfer. YES, there's some HUGE wide ranging dealers/owners with multiple dealerships...yes they transfer trucks around.....It's FAR from the norm.
 

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Please, don't attempt to tell me about the car business. I spent 30 years in every position from washing cars up to and including dealer principle (I owned a Toyota dealership). We were one of 5 Toyota dealers in a city of just under 1 million. 1 dealership sold 4-500 new units a month, we did 50-70 when we could get them. I traded vehicles at a rate of about 30%.
When a dealer trade occurs, the MCO (Manufacturers Certificate of origin) and sale notification (which goes to the zone office) goes with the vehicle. You absolutely get credit for every unit sold.
In this market, manufacturers routinely force dealers to accept units they may not want (slow selling sedans, odd colors or options) in order to get the stuff that's hot. Chrysler just made headlines when their dealers started a small revolt over being force fed cars they didn't want. RPO's (regular production orders, re: special orders) are, to a great extent, rare. Sure, occasionally they will have to special order something, but it's a rare occurrence. Drive past any dealership and you'll see hundreds of cars and trucks sitting on the lot. Some of the larger dealerships have thousands (and the mega guys (like Penske) have hundreds of dealerships, so many thousands of cars sitting on the lot. Every single one is floorplanned (bought on credit) and financed through both the manufacturer and local banks. Imagine the cost of paying 4-7% interest daily on a 1000 $40-70k cars.
Trust me on this. Trades happen daily. My last purchase (5 months ago) was originally sent to a dealer in Ontario and dealer traded to the dealer in Riverside I bought it from. I found it doing an online search of the mfg's website, called both dealers to negotiate the price, bought it from the guy in Riverside who traded it for the same car of a different color. It had 13 miles on it when I picked it up (the mileage between locations). I flew from Nashville to LAX and the dealer picked me up to take me to his dealership. Did the paperwork and was on my way in a little over an hour.
BTW, just for your general enlightenment, you don't necessarily have to take delivery of a car at the dealership. I took factory delivery of my last 2 Corvette's at the plant in Bowling Green (actually, at the National Corvette Museum). The one before last (A Z06) I even drove up to Bowling Green and helped assemble the engine before coming back to take delivery of the car. I have a C8 on order, but they haven't yet announced when (or if) the engine build experience will be available.
Some dealers will sell you a car/truck from the next state over and will flatbed it to the state line for delivery. That's rare, but not unheard of.
For the OP, I'd seriously look at some of the large Ford truck dealerships. Like Diffee Ford in El Reno OK or Sam Pack in Dallas. Diffee has got to have 200+ F-350's in stock at any time and Pack the same. Galpin is the biggest in the world, but they don't have a great reputation. You might save yourself some bucks.
 

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Well.....WHOA....a big wig with Toyota knows everything about every type of dealership. Pin a rose on you.


I never said trades DON'T happen, it's just not the norm. Just cause YOU did the leg work and got the dealers to work a trade DOESN'T mean they ALL do it ALL the time as you try to suggest.
If they don't have exactly what you want in stock (color, model, options) they do a simple computer check to find it sitting on a lot somewhere else. They'll "trade" with the other dealer or just buy it from him.
Fully 90% of vehicles sold today are never "factory ordered"
This is the biggest lie....as all the trucks need to be built at the factory, hence they need to be ordered FROM the factory. Yes, a play on words but the idea a person can't get their truck "factory ordered" AND delivered to their direct dealer is a flat lie. I've done it MULTIPLE times.





BTW, just for your general enlightenment, you don't necessarily have to take delivery of a car at the dealership.
BTW for your "enlightenment"......I already know that SOME manufacturers have a "factory delivery" to their customers. BMW will do the same thing for just about any model that you purchase from them. For the crowd IF you are ordering a BMW I highly suggest taking the delivery in Spartanburg. WELL worth it.



Additional enlightenment that you seem to need....Factory delivery of a Ford Super Duty hasn't become a "option" or a particular "feature" that Ford has offered for it's customers. YES, it may be possible if one pushes the issue.....it's FAR from a normal part of the sales process.


Additional enlightenment for you: The single program for trucks that Ford does offer is with the Raptors. They offer a program called Raptor Assault (or something) that allows you a week or so driving "program" with Ford personnel that teach you about the Raptor functions and such. PLENTY of Raptor people will follow their "factory ordered" trucks from order acceptance to VIN assignment to rail delivery to being on the haul truck for delivery.



Of course "SOME" dealers will flat bed a truck across state lines.....at a additional fee. IF you are lucky the dealership will have it "flat bedded" to make the sale. DO NOT expect every dealership to do it for free!
 

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Not the gospel but from another site member circa 2018:


1 When you place a factory order most dealerships will give a computer printout of your truck as it is spec'd. This is a dealership printout and not a true copy of the order that is submitted to Ford. Always ask your salesman/sales manager for a copy of the Dealer Order Receipt Acknowledgement (DORA) The DORA is what has been submitted to Ford it is easiest to catch mistakes here as the next time you will be able to catch mistakes in the order wont be until they truck goes into production and the window sticker is generated which is too late to make changes to the order. REMEMBER some options can be added by the dealer or by yourself without much trouble but somethings CANNOT ex. SyncConnect is not a dealer installed option and is a great pain to add it yourself. Other things are much easier to install that they dealer wont such as the 36 gallon fuel tank. REBATES & INCENTIVES are locked in at the time of order (except for certificates) If the programs change between when you have ordered and when the truck comes in you can use the locked in programs or the new ones depending on what is more beneficial to you.

2 Once your order has been submitted to Ford Ford has to "pull" the order before it will show up in cotus ( Customer Order Tracking US COTUS ) Several factors go into how fast your order will show up in cotus. Ford pulls orders on Thursday each week... smaller dealerships will usually have their orders pulled faster then large volume dealerships that have to go through the allocation process.

3 In December ford halts production for 2 weeks for the Christmas/New Years holidays and also for maintenance and adding mid-year changes to the line.

4 You can make changes to your order before it shows up in cotus and it will not effect when the truck will be built. Once the truck is in cotus you will see an order date. This is the date that Ford pulled the order. On cotus it will show your truck being "in order processing". This will be the first place you can see the VIN number

5 Usually once the truck shows up in cotus the dealership can look on their internal Ford system and it will show them a build date. For the first week or two the build date will show as a "week of" date as in "week of Feb. 19-26" then the build date will get updated to a specific day. Once the build date has been scheduled you can still make changes to your order but it will likely reset your place in the que.

6 Your truck will go into production 6-10 days before the actual build date. When it does it will show in cotus as "in order processing completed" with the date and it will show "in production". 24 or so hours from when your truck goes into production the window sticker link will be active (this link only appears in cotus once you have entered production"

7 On the window sticker at the top center you will see some numbers over the word blend that look like this 220180227 this is the build date aka when your frame is blended into the production line. It breaks down like this: 2=? 2018=year built 02=month built 27=day built.

8 Also on the window sticker in the field where the MSRP is you will see a box that says "method of transp." This is how the truck will leave the FACTORY not how the truck is being shipped to you, it will either be RAIL or CONVOY. So if you live in Florida and see the method of shipping is CONVOY they arent truck transporting the truck all the way from Dearborn. They will transport it to an offsite ramp and be put on a rail car there. One ramp they use is the CSX ramp in New Boston MI 20 miles or so from the factory. If the method of transport is RAIL then they truck will be put on a rail car right at the factory. If you use the satellite view on google maps of the Dearborn factory you can see the loading ramps on site.

9 Once your truck is built it will show "awaiting shipment" and the date that it finished production will be shown. Normally it will sit in awaiting shipment a day or two and sometimes it will go from in production to awaiting shipment to "in transit" within a few hours. Occasionally it will sit in awaiting shipment longer. Ford does extended QC testing on random trucks and this could cause a delay in this step. A spray in bed liner could also cause a delay here.

10 When your truck leaves the factory either by rail or convoy cotus will update to "in transit". It can take a while to get the truck from the factory to your dealership for many reasons. Ford ships trucks at the most beneficial cost to them to get the best cost they have to ship so many trucks to a certain rail head. Jessup MD is the largest rail head on the east coast and Ford probably has to ship so many rail cars with so many trucks on them to get a good price. With that knowledge your truck might be sitting at the ramp at the factory end until enough trucks are built for the rail cars that are going to the destination ramp. Once your truck is on a rail car it might have to go through a number of intermediate yards to switch trains before arriving at the final destination and finally when it is at the destination ramp it can sit for a number of days before enough vehicles are going to your dealership / in that direction, to multiple dealerships, to fill a car transporter. All of this can add days/weeks to transportation time.

You can also track your truck using the JCT portal This is only good to see if your truck has left the destination rail head and is on its way to your dealership. It will show as pending until it is actually loaded on the car transporter so it is not really useful as a tracking tool as that is usually only a couple hours at most before it gets to the dealership and as soon as it get there cotus updates quickly to show it being delivered. I called my salesman as soon as I saw on cotus it had changed to delivered he told me it rolled off the truck 20 minutes before my call.

That's the basic factory order process
 

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Even more info about the Priority Codes and Allocation:


It is largely determined by (1) dealer allocation, (2) order priority, and (3) component availability and (4) production capacity (part shortages not withstanding).

Placing Your Order at the Dealership:

Two (major) things affect your order once your dealer enters it into the system: priority order code and dealer allocation.

Priority Code:

Ford only schedules so many orders (from dealers) each week. As a result, each dealership has to determine what order (sequence) their truck orders should be picked up in. A holding queue for that dealership, if you will, with all the truck orders in a single line from which only one truck at a time can be released, is needed. Think of it as thread off of a spool or a print job from a printer queue.

To do this, the dealer uses/assigns a priority code from 10 to 99 to each order. If your dealer prints your order or shows you the screen, you'll see it on there.

While 10 is a lower numerical number, it is the highest priority order code a dealer can assign. Subsequently, while 99 is a higher numerical value, it is the lowest priority. Think of a priority order code the same way you would think of a college football player being "ranked" for an upcoming draft (1st is highest ranked, then 2nd, then 3rd, etc.). Until the orders are selected for scheduling by Ford, the priority order codes only apply internally at each dealership. Meaning, this is the order in which that the dealership will "release" the customer orders in when Ford asks for them. This allows the dealership to prioritize certain trucks AHEAD of other trucks, regardless of when the customer actually placed the order. That's why it pays to get the highest priority order code (lowest number) assigned to your order. Dealerships often (but not always) assign lower priority order codes (higher numbers) to stock orders while assigning higher priority order codes (lower numbers) to retail orders so you (a retail buyer placing an order) get your truck faster, which means they sell a truck faster.

Before moving on, note that while the highest priority order code a DEALERSHIP can assign is 10, Ford Motor Company (the manufacturer) can assign a priority order code of 01 to 09. Essentially, Ford can decide if any particular dealer orders should be prioritized higher than "most" others. They often use higher priority to replace vehicles damaged during transport.

So at this point, we have a list of truck orders for each dealer and the orders are lined up in the sequence that the dealer wants them pulled for scheduling based on their priority order code. I believe tiebreakers (same priority order code for more than one truck) are determined by the date/time the order was entered).

Allocation:

Ford allows each dealer to order a certain number of F150's per week. This is called dealer allocation. The number of trucks a dealership is allocated differs from dealer to dealer. One dealer may have an allocation of 10 trucks per week, while another might have 50 per week. Ford determines allocation for each dealer, largely depending on how many trucks that dealership is moving.

Keep allocation in mind for later.

How Orders are Picked From Order System (from the dealers) FOR Scheduling:

On WED/THU of each week, the Ford planning system reviews all the orders at the dealerships to select which ones it is going to accept into the system for purposes of scheduling them to be built. It does NOT just take ALL orders and schedule them for build.

Which sequence the orders are selected to come into the planning system is based on a combination of (a) round-robin dealership selection process (think of it as teams participating in the NFL draft) and (b) allocation (how many TOTAL orders (aka players) a single dealer can select during the entire draft (for the entire week).

Here's the process, at very high level:

Think of the selection process working like the "draft" process for major sports: Each team (dealer) gets ONE choice per "round" to send ONE order for planning, just like each team gets to select ONE college player per round.

Round 1: Each dealership gets ONE choice. For each dealership, the truck with the highest priority order code (lowest number) within that dealership is selected. Once every dealer has had the opportunity to send ONE order for planning, its starts back over. Same order of teams, just a new round.

Round 2: Each dealer, again, gets ONE choice. They send the truck order that had the next highest priority order code (lowest number) in their queue.

Round 3, 4, 5 ... : It goes from round to round allowing each dealer to get ONE pick per round, and each dealer picking their highest priority customer order left in the queue.

Now here's the tricky part: Remember dealer allocation?

Dealers don't just get to keep submitting orders until every order they have has been sent for scheduling. This is largely due to capacity and material planning.

Each week, each dealer will only have orders picked for scheduling until the dealer's number of orders selected reaches their allocation. For example, if a dealership's allocation is 10 trucks per week, that dealership will "cut off" from having more orders selected for scheduling starting in "Round 11". That dealership is done participating in the draft for that week.

After allocation is met and a dealer is cut off for the week, the orders left over in that dealership's internal queue must now wait until NEXT week for the same process to begin.

The very next WED/THU, the same process starts again: Round-robin, highest priority, next highest priority, etc., until allocation is met for that week, then no more for that dealership again until the following week.

This is why it, if you're trying to order a vehicle that is in high demand, you should work with a dealer that has a very large allocation. They can order more trucks per week. It' less likely that your order will get held over until the following week (or weeks).

Allocation is why some people on here have been waiting for several MONTHS just to see their truck get scheduled to be built, while other guys ordered much LATER, yet their trucks are already scheduled, built, or delivered.

How Picked Orders are Scheduled for Build AFTER Ford Selects Them Each Week:

Remember when I said that priority order code only applies internally? Well, that now changes. Now, the priority order code is a factor in determining which orders get scheduled before other orders across all dealership orders.

Let's say that 15,000 orders for F150 trucks are selected to be scheduled for build. The order with the highest priority (lowest number) gets scheduled first. Lots of trucks have the same priority code, so the process generally follows a pattern of date/time the order was entered (selected during the "draft", which was based on the date/time the orders were entered). It's actually more involved then that, but that's it in a nutshell.

Vehicles are first assigned to be built during a certain week (shows as a Monday date). As it gets closer to that week, the vehicles are assigned to specific build DATES (the day of). All of this is based on (and sometimes is affected later by) a variable plethora of variables, including material planning/component and part availability, plant production capacity and rates, the labor issues or weather causing delays or shortages, etc., etc..

Understand that trucks are not built in the order of the VIN number. A VIN is assigned before a truck is built. There are many factors that affect when a truck will be assigned to be built, but suffice it to say, they aren't in VIN order.

As a consequence, the assembly plant needs a way to keep track of what order they WILL build the trucks in. If they didn't, they would not be able to ensure that the RIGHT parts are at the RIGHT places at the RIGHT times. Today, many components are shipped to the assembly plants either sequences (a specific component is going to be installed on one EXACT VIN) or they are shipped "just in time". The latter simply allows Ford to maintain a much smaller component inventory level. If you go back 15-20 years or more, they used to keep much more inventory on hand -- sometimes WEEKS. Carrying inventory costs money, and JIT reduces this cost.

How they keep track of the build order is by what is called a BLEND number. Actually, it's a combination of a BLEND number and a ROTATION number, but that's not important.

A blend number is nothing more than bank of numbers assigned in numerical order to a vehicle when it's scheduled. For the F150, it's ~10K numbers from 0001 to 9999 The trucks are built in order of blend number. 3456 is after 3455 and before 3457. Occasionally, an odd blend number will come along. If a vehicle build is put on hold at the last minute, simply re-insert it (same blend number) somewhere later.

Hope this helps someone understand the order and scheduling process.
 

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The above two posts have long been the standard process or expectations that most every dealer I have ever dealt with will follow. I would go so far as to say this was what I have experienced since 2004 when looking or placing an order for a "factory ordered" truck.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Seems like a fair price. I'm about to order one myself. I visited a dealership a week ago and they said they couldn't order one that day, but would get back with me. That was over a week ago. Seems pretty unusual for a truck that lists for ~ $70K. Where are you buying it? Thanks
I’m in Alberta Canada. I bought it from a large dealer who has about 6 dealerships in western Canada.
Hope you get a great deal!
 

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Hello everyone. I'm looking to buy and build my first Ford too and needing some pointers. I went to a dealer this afternoon and had the guy price me a 2020 F250 Xlt crew long bed. With options it was $62,270 msrp. He said he could do $55 and some change and would take approx 6-8 weeks to get the truck.

Is that a good price considering I don't have any access to plan pricing?

When I got home from the dealer, I built the truck on Fords site and sent it to another 3 dealers. Awaiting to hear back from them now.

Any assistance/advice would be greatly appreciated!!!
 
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