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Discussion Starter #1
Have any of you guys done a tranny flush on your '08 yet? I pull with mine alot and wanna make sure the tranny has good life-blood in it. haha

Should I just go with the Ford Mercon 5 or go synthetic with the AMSOIL? Any other suggestions?
 

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The main thing here is high temperature fluid life. I would have to say go with Ford's recommended fluid for the first 60,000 miles unless you have a reason not to do so. I change mine every 30,000 miles.

After that I may put in Amsoil ATF recommended for replacement of MA5.


edit: Err, I mean 15,000 miles. Last time was at 30,000.
 

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I've got 25K miles on it now. I don't really see a reason to wait till 60 before going AMSOIL if I'm going to do that at all. Any technical reason behind that or just calling it safe for warranty purposes?

My fear is getting somewhere 500 miles away with the boat or car hauler and being stranded with a burned up tranny. :doh:
 

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I've got 25K miles on it now. I don't really see a reason to wait till 60 before going AMSOIL if I'm going to do that at all. Any technical reason behind that or just calling it safe for warranty purposes?

My fear is getting somewhere 500 miles away with the boat or car hauler and being stranded with a burned up tranny. :doh:

The reasoning is due to warranty issues. Just more of a potential hassle in my opinion. It should not in any way void the warranty.

Your not going to burn up a transmission because your using Mercon V in your transmission. The main advantage to using synthetic fluid is the longer life. If your towing a lot and change it at 15,000 miles there is no danger of failure due to the Mercon V fluid. It can handle the heat for the recommended service life.

One thing about synthetic fluids is that they do not transfer heat as much as fossil fluids. This is why you may see lower temperatures with synthetic fluid. Such as oil temperatures may show slightly lower temps when you change to synthetic when you have an oil temperature gauge. Same thing with a transmission fluid temperature gauge. The difference is not enough to hurt anything. However a lot of people think their engine is running cooler with synthetic oil. Actually the oil is cooler but the engine is slightly hotter. The heat transfer to the fossil oil is greater and therefore you see higher oil temperature. The oil acts as a coolant for the engine so the hotter it is the more heat it is actually removing from the engine. Same thing applies to the transmission.

Many air cooled engine manufacturers recommend not using synthetic oil for this reason. Some have reconsidered in recent years because it was determined that the temperature difference was slight enough to not be a problem. Especially if larger cooler fins were used in later models. Oil change intervals are able to be extended because the oil does not break down as fast as fossil oil. When they are new oils they are both doing the job. The fossil oils just need to be changed more often. I think 25,000 is pushing the limit for towing. You can check and see if it is turning brown or if it's still bright red to determine how bad it is.

It's hard to get all the old fluid out so you may need to change it at regular intervals a couple of times before extending the intervals.
 

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Mercon V is just a standard and most of the makers of the fluids from what I see are synthetic or synthetic blends anyway, so why switch?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Mercon V is just a standard and most of the makers of the fluids from what I see are synthetic or synthetic blends anyway, so why switch?
Well, actually the switch to AMSOIL is $60 cheaper than buying the Ford Mercon V stuff. That's one reason.

Another reason to go full synthetic (I actually don't know if the Ford Mercon V is or not) is because of the moisture absorption issues. Dino oils absorb alot of moisture/condensation whereas synthetics don't. That condensation can wreak havoc on internals. I own a few cars that only get driven a few (and I mean less than 10) miles per year. I have to put synthetic in these cars for that purpose...and a few others.

I also figured someone on here might be a little more aware of whether the trannies like the lubrication and breakdown qualities of the AMSOIL (or similar) moreso than the Ford Mercon V stuff. Anyone?
 

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When I did my tranny fluid, I used the Ford fluid. I was told it is synthetic. I looked at the Amsoil but at the time it was not listed as a replacement for the Mercon V. I also changed the internal filter, but left the external filter in place. I bought the truck with 8K miles on it and and changed all the fluids just to be safe.
 

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Uuummmm, you are all talking Mercon V, but the Torqueshift uses Mercon SP. Totally different.
 
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APPLICATIONS
AMSOIL Synthetic Universal Automatic Transmission Fluid is completely compatible with other synthetic and petroleum automatic transmission fluids. AMSOIL ATF is a universal, multi-functional fluid that greatly reduces the need for specialized fluid inventories and the possibilities of misapplication.

AMSOIL ATF is recommended for transmission, hydraulic and other applications requiring any of the following specifications:

GM DEXRON® II, III & VI
Ford MERCON®, MERCON® V & SP
Chrysler ATF+ through ATF+4®
Honda Z-1 (Not for use in CVT transmissions)
Toyota Type T and T-IV
Mitsubishi/Hyundai Diamond SP II & III
Allison C-3, C-4
Caterpillar TO-2
Voith G607, G1363
ZF TE-ML 14A, 14B, 14C
Mercedes Benz 236.1, 236.2, 236.6, 236.7, 236.9
BMW 7045E
NAG 1 & 2
JWS 3309
LT 71141 (ESSO)
Nissan Matic D, J & K
Vickers I-286S & M-2950S
Excellent for power steering units that use ATF.

Not for use in CVT transmissions.
 

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I just put in the suncoast tranny and went with Amsoil ATF fluid for what its worth.
 

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Well, actually the switch to AMSOIL is $60 cheaper than buying the Ford Mercon V stuff. That's one reason.

Another reason to go full synthetic (I actually don't know if the Ford Mercon V is or not) is because of the moisture absorption issues. Dino oils absorb alot of moisture/condensation whereas synthetics don't. That condensation can wreak havoc on internals. I own a few cars that only get driven a few (and I mean less than 10) miles per year. I have to put synthetic in these cars for that purpose...and a few others.

I also figured someone on here might be a little more aware of whether the trannies like the lubrication and breakdown qualities of the AMSOIL (or similar) moreso than the Ford Mercon V stuff. Anyone?
I don't know any of this mumbo jumbo but what i do know is that once i started using all 100% synthetics in my vehicles i never had another tranny problem in hundreds of thousands of miles without changing fluids. My 94 Bronce is about 330,000 on mobil one ATF installed at 30 k. The car is owned by a friend that i sold it to in 96. I havent converted my super duty yet cept for mortor oil but i will soon. Oh, that bronco tows boats mostly a sea ray 27 foot weekender.
 

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The Torque Shift 5-speed uses MERCON SP which is a full synthetic. DO NOT USE MERCON V in the Torque shift...
 
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