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I have a 06’ F250 with a 6.0 power stroke. I just got the truck from my future father in-law and wanted to do an oil change on it. I went to remove to drain plug but found the threads to be striped and the plug stuck in the pan. It spins both ways with no tightening or loosening. I’m not sure how to get it out. Ideally if it can be removed I plain to attempt to re-thread it but need to get the plug out. Any ideas?
 

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Can you wedge the tip of a screwdriver (or the shaft of a screwdriver if it's backed out far enough) between the pan and the head and put some pressure against it while you try to back it out?

-jokester
 

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Do you have a breaker bar and a socket you can you use to apply torque to it slowly? Maybe spray it with penetrating oil?
 
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I have a 06’ F250 with a 6.0 power stroke. I just got the truck from my future father in-law and wanted to do an oil change on it. I went to remove to drain plug but found the threads to be striped and the plug stuck in the pan. It spins both ways with no tightening or loosening. I’m not sure how to get it out. Ideally if it can be removed I plain to attempt to re-thread it but need to get the plug out. Any ideas?
I would imagine that there was a lot of evidence of leakage there?

What is the oil level?
 

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Grab the opposite edges of the hex with vice-grips, with the handle pointing down. Pull hard downward while turning counter-clockwise. The plug's threads may be hurt more than the pans.

However, they make oversize drain plugs with cutting edges for this situation. If that does not work, you can get new double-sheet laminated pans from Ford, or Dorman sells single-layer cheaper pans.
 

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I believe that drain plugs are made from softer metal than the weld nut in the oil pan with the intention that the plug threads would be damaged first and not the pan threads. My experience has shown this to be true with the exception of aluminum oil pans. I have removed my share of stripped and damaged drain plugs and the pan is always okay - though I have had to pick metal out of the threads with a fine pick.

I do not understand the mindset that leads to this. Either there is a belief that the drain plug will come out unless it is tightened well beyond specification or it's carelessness. There is a torque spec for all of them however most skilled technicians know how to snug them up appropriately. While I might giggle a little at someone using a torque wrench on a drain plug It would please me to see some thought and care is being taken regarding the process.

An oil drain plug, once broken loose should be capable of being threaded out using your fingers and not have to be wrenched out or use a socket until it comes out. If you cannot do by finger the threads are already damaged - toss it and install a new plug.

With an oil plug like this that just spins in both directions it is most likely new oil pan time. Attempting to get an edged tool under the plug while turning might work...
 

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Any luck?

-jokester
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Can you wedge the tip of a screwdriver (or the shaft of a screwdriver if it's backed out far enough) between the pan and the head and put some pressure against it while you try to back it out?

-jokester
I did try to get a screwdriver under the in between the head of the plug and the pan however the crush washer is making it difficult to get good leverage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Last resort you can replace the pan
If you get it out, put a fumoto or EZ valve in it
[/QUOTE
Do you have a breaker bar and a socket you can you use to apply torque to it slowly? Maybe spray it with penetrating oil?
I would imagine that there was a lot of evidence of leakage there?

What is the oil level?
Honestly not really. Besides there being minimal oil around the plug there wasn’t much. Oil level fine
 

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Get a set of vice grips, like @TooManyToys suggested and pull down on the plug while you try to turn it.

-jokester
 
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You may have to go all in on this one. You could use a small 8" pry bar and lightly hammer it between the head and pan distorting the copper washer. You could use a sharp chisel but the thickness might do too much damage. Once it is tight slowly back the bolt out and see if the difference in height and pressure from the small pry bar screwdriver allow it to catch that last thread left. At this point you have no choice IMO other than replacing the pan if none of this works. Only crappy part is if the welded insert broke free in the pan, then you're decision is made.

Change the pan or destroy it taking it out.

Good Luck





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It worked. I hammered the screwdriver in and used vice grips. This is the plug that was in there.
How the heck does someone gum up all the threads? I’ve seen them with the bottom end screwed up, the first few threads screwed up, but I don’t recall one that had every thread gummed up at the same time. That must have been cross threaded, numerous times. Glad you were able to get it out. Hope it didn’t ruin your pan doing it.
 

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Future father-in-law .....

You know, you could end up like that.

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Considering the extrusion of the copper, I'd say that is not the first time it has been over-torqued.

Internally threaded parts are using spec'd to have a higher strength and hardness than the male threads going in. Hopefully, the pans threads are OK. Worst case, + TIME-SERT® STRIPPED OIL DRAIN PAN REPAIR KITS FOR STRIPPED THREADS + Stripped oil pan thread repair kits, leaking oil drain pan stripped or leaking threads stripped oil pan oil drain pan stripped threads stripped drain pan threads, leaking oil pan threads leaking, fix stripped oil drain pan leaking drain plug threads

An inside view.

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