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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

I wanted to get some recommedations for storing my PSD during my deployment to Iraq. Ive tried searching this forum, but i had no luck. I leave in Oct and will be gone for a year so just wanted to see the best way to store it. I do not have access to a garage so i'll be getting a truck cover, but what about fluids and fuel? Its going to be parked in my backyard and i'm worried about moisture building up in engine components, etc.. with all the snow we get here in upstate NY its a real concern of mine

thanks,

Dom
 

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Pretty much do the same things you would for any other vehicle being stored for any length of time.

  • Change the oil and run it to circulate it to all the areas.
  • Drain the cooling system and replace fluids if heads and block are cast iron, for aluminum, don't refill the system.
  • Check other fluids and if they look dirty, flush and replace otherwise top off, i.e. brake fluids, transmission, rear axle, etc..
  • Don't forget to top off the fuel tank and add additives so the fuel doesn't go bad.
  • Seal off any engine openings to prevent moisture, rodents or bugs from entering, i.e. tail pipes, air cleaners, etc..
  • Remove batteries and place on trickle charger if available.
  • Loosen drive belt to remove tension and prevent stretching, assuming manual tensioner here.
  • If possible, put on blocks if being stored for a long time, if blocks are unavailable, add 10-15 PSI to prevent flat spots.
  • Was and wax vehicle, properly treat all rubber, vinyl and leather components, stay away from armor-all.
  • If you wash the carpet make sure you give it plenty of dry time before storing it.
  • Remove the wiper blades and wrap wiper arms in a towel or something to prevent scratching the windshield.
It also helps if you keep a checklist of everything you did do so you know what to put back on, remove or readjust before you attempt to start the vehicle.

You can find more info searching for how to store a vehicle.

It's a shame it's gonna be exposed to the elements, makes it a bit harder to protect it, but not impossible.

Be safe over there.
 

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back in 05 i got deployed to iraq. i was stationed in LA. as you remember correctly, thats when hurricane katrina kit. there was no damaged from the hurricane, but as you can imagine, it was pretty dirty. two flat tires, dead battery, and that musty wet carpet smell, (from a seperate water incident). i highly recommend putting it in a garage that will keep it maintained for you. itll cost you a little more, but when you return itll be clean and well running. or give it to a relative that you trust to run and drive it occasionally. i also had a motorcycle in the back uncovered. it was trashed. seat all gunked up, plastic grungy from the weather, carb gummed up. still trying to get it lookin good
 

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Discussion Starter #4
:thumb:Thank you for the advice. You guys had very good points that I would've overlooked. Unfortunatly Not to many vehicle storage places around here that i can trust. I think if I follow your advice the truck will be fine.

thanks again,

Dom :thumb:
 

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I would try and get the fuel tank down as low as possible. Diesel can grow things overtime. When back, fill the tank run about 200 miles then change the fuel filters.

Be safe:thumb: and thank you for your service.
 

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I would try and get the fuel tank down as low as possible. Diesel can grow things overtime. When back, fill the tank run about 200 miles then change the fuel filters.

Be safe:thumb: and thank you for your service.

Leave the tank full. You want as little air space in there as possible to keep condensation out of there. Empty tank = more condensation. More than that, *do not* put bio diesel in there for an extended time unused. Bio diesel is more prone to biological contamination (bacteria and algae). Make sure you put petroleum diesel with a fuel stabilizer and an algicide in there. And fill it all the way up the neck. Realistically, diesel lasts almost indefinitely. I store diesel in a portable fuel trailer for over a year some times before I use it. I have put it in my 2008 before with zero problems. That was even without a stabilizer. If possible use a stabilizer, and definitely an algicide.

I agree with everything else every one has suggested.
 

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Like Eli said, you want as little air as possible in the fuel tank. Try filling it all the way up the filler neck if you can. Add any additives before topping it off so you don't run out of room. The less air in the system the less chance of condensation building up or growth of any kind.

Also, one of the things I've always done with my dirt bikes and street bikes when they weren't going to be run for a while was pull the spark plug and add a cap full of oil to each cylinder. This helped prevent any rust in the cylinder itself.

Now I know diesels don't have spark plugs, but if there's anyway to do the same, you may want to look at that as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
thanks again for everyones input. :)

no I do not live in Post housing. we have long term storage offered but its outside and not very secure. i would just leave it at my mom's garage but the truck doesnt fit.... which is a good thing... i dont want to give my old man any reasons to drive it :hehe:
 

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it would be better for the truck if your dad where to drive it while you where deployed
 

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yeah i bought a tent for mine while i was gone. had my dad drive it once in a while. it keeps it out of the weather and the batts charged up. got the tent from northern tool. JUST MAKE SURE YOU TIE IT DOWN REAL WELL . i had my old dakota in it and the wind picked it up and tossed it.
 
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