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Discussion Starter #1
Having some really bad luck with the 5r110 trannys, not sure if I've got the short straw or what. The truck is a 2003 f250 6.0 (obviously) with studs, deleted, exhaust, shiny parts; IC pipes, intake horn, ect.., 155/30 injectors, and some other goodies. I am running the SPD tune on the original SCT Livewire, The motor has about 10k on it, everything was replaced and done professionally, the trans however had 255xxx and bit the dust in the beginning of August, with the nasty 3-5 flare, eventually cutting out overdrive or "5" completely, along with the reverse shudder. Did have the codes. Came to the conclusion it had a good life and Sourced a replacement with 150k and threw it in, New fluid, XDP modified direct clutch solenoid to prevent the same issue, new filters in both. Did a thorough relearn, and it was perfect. After a month of driving and about 1500 miles, the 3-5 shift flare resurfaced. Started driving a little nicer, after 3 days, the reverse hop came in, the 3-5 flare got even worse, and would hunt for overdrive. It eventually caught, but was nothing short of a ordeal. Called the shop I got the used trans from, they honored the warranty, and I am now putting the third trans in. What can be done to avoid frying the overdrive clutches? Has anybody had similar experiences? Could it be the SPD tune (original issues came after a month of switching from canned SCT tunes to the SPD) Looking for some insight so I do not have to yank that heavy son of a ***** out again. Thanks for your time, god bless
 

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Make sure the ground straps are in good condition and making good contact, I remember reading a few threads where a bad transmission ground caused all kinds of problems. It wouldn't be a bad idea to run an extra ground from the transmission to the frame.
 

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you can not properly flush the air to oil cooler ( the plate and fin makes it impossible even with a bi directional chemical flush ) so it needs to be replaced ( according to ford and my results ) if you previous trans had contaminated the fluid with paste or chunks
 

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I stand by my suggestion of flushing the cooler and lines. Replace it if you choose. Plate and fin coolers are common applications, even in aviation. Oil coolers are flushed and ac systems are flushed when a compressor grenades, so the idea that the trans cooler cannot be flushed is ridiculous at best. Shoot me a pm if you need guidance.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Make sure the ground straps are in good condition and making good contact, I remember reading a few threads where a bad transmission ground caused all kinds of problems. It wouldn't be a bad idea to run an extra ground from the transmission to the frame.
Will be doing this tonight, thank you for your response.
 

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Plate and fin coolers can trap debris in a manner that a traditional low psi bi directional flush can not dislodge
Ford dictates this replacement not Me so argue your theory with their engineers. your suggestion is not inline with their recommendations. they belive this is so important that their replacement transmission includes this cooler in the crate and their warranty requires this change out .

I have seen results of a transmission that had metal paste in the fluid and the results of a flush on the plate type cooler
even with solvent based flushing in two directions the cooler would still release trapped debris over time

the problem with the 6.0 is the remote filter is a bypass so once it is clogged it bypasses the junk thru the system and the in pan screen is not fine enough to stop damaging contaminates

IMO if your automotive ac compressor grenades and you just flush the condenser and slap in a new compressor you're being ridiculous or cheap
 

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No need to argue with Ford. Bell & Sikorsky say otherwise, and that’s also blessed by the FAA. You and I disagree obviously, and that’s ok. It’s not my vehicle, your vehicle, and best of all it’s not life threatening if he decides to follow nobody’s advice.
Maybe debris was an issue-maybe he has another problem, or just bad luck. Your cheap comment doesn’t bother me. It was actually amusing. As far as the 6.0 filter being a bypass, that’s most filters.

You eluded to an excellent point though. Allowing a filter to go into bypass is the difference between ASE and A&P.
 

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You and I disagree obviously, and that’s ok.
I can respect that and honestly I am impressed with that stance thanks


Maybe the cooling passages in your aircraft are larger ? IDK ? i have to imagine your flushing devices are probably far more advanced and have to be part performance verified ?


the problem with this ford unit is it really requires isolation and a two way flush and even then i have seen it let go of debris long after it was flushed with standard flush equipment

, the second cooler is at the bottom of the radiator and is easier to flush even though it is a plate style
as far as AC condenser the 6.0 uses a multi piston unit and can spit black death into the system

here is why a flush vs replacement is just better IMO https://aircondition.com/tech/questions/what-is-black-death

You're not going to replace your home condenser if the compressor fails ( unless it is r22 lol ) but for the cost of most vehicle condensing units I wouldn't think twice
 

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If we all thought alike, this would be a pretty boring site and world. Differences in opinion can be good-this place, to me anyway, is a good place to collaborate information and help each other. We all have different backgrounds, specialties, and experiences. Yours, I assume, is related to these trucks as you have some pretty specific insight as do a few others that pop into mind (hydro, sparky, and bismic).

Our cooler passageways are actually smaller mainly for space and weight purposes, but are designed to be efficient and slightly robust. Metal in a cooler I can deal with. Rubber stays inside, and requires replacement. To be fair the we have impending bypasses which warn of restrictions in flow, complete bypasses, oil analysis, chip detectors (ferrous material is caught with the ability to be burned off), and accelerometers to measure and monitor vibration. Every part has a different frequency which can be converted to rpms. From the rpm we know exactly which gear or bearing is going out. The transmissions are tested and FAA certified to be able to run 30 minutes with no oil. Even with all that, they still go out. An overhauled unit will set you back $847k and a new one is well over a million dollars-ask me how I know. They are supposed to be serviceable for 6,000 hours before requiring overhaul, but I’ve never seen one make it past 4,000.

AC systems are typically a PITA to put it nicely. I prefer the electric meggitt compressor until it’s time for the 300 hour brush change. That’s when I prefer the trans driven Liebherr dual compressor system. At least until the belt change comes due. I find it easier (less frustrating) to pull the compressors and do it on a table.

A lot of aviation bleeds into my vehicle maintenance. Whether it’s mileage, calendar time, or hours oil changes are done. I recently just changed oil on my tdi with literally 0 miles and 0 hours since the last change. It just reached calendar time. Probably an unnecessary expense, but it’s a habit. If it works for an engine spinning at 50,000 rpm, it will be ok for something that lives under 3k.

Back to the transmission. I’ll attach a picture of a chip detector and what it caught. Because of shape and size no action was required. I didn’t agree with it, but a subsequent flight yielded nothing else. I hope the OP gets his tranny issues worked out. Aside from the financial aspect, I’m sure it’s disheartening-especially if he had to do #3. Hopefully he pulled the pan and inspected the filters to see what kind, if any, debris was in the system. A used trans-especially one with supposedly 150k is a roll of the dice in my opinion. I believe 100% that’s what he was told.
It’s just impossible to know once it’s out of the truck, and on a shelf.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
If we all thought alike, this would be a pretty boring site and world. Differences in opinion can be good-this place, to me anyway, is a good place to collaborate information and help each other. We all have different backgrounds, specialties, and experiences. Yours, I assume, is related to these trucks as you have some pretty specific insight as do a few others that pop into mind (hydro, sparky, and bismic).



Our cooler passageways are actually smaller mainly for space and weight purposes, but are designed to be efficient and slightly robust. Metal in a cooler I can deal with. Rubber stays inside, and requires replacement. To be fair the we have impending bypasses which warn of restrictions in flow, complete bypasses, oil analysis, chip detectors (ferrous material is caught with the ability to be burned off), and accelerometers to measure and monitor vibration. Every part has a different frequency which can be converted to rpms. From the rpm we know exactly which gear or bearing is going out. The transmissions are tested and FAA certified to be able to run 30 minutes with no oil. Even with all that, they still go out. An overhauled unit will set you back $847k and a new one is well over a million dollars-ask me how I know. They are supposed to be serviceable for 6,000 hours before requiring overhaul, but I’ve never seen one make it past 4,000.



AC systems are typically a PITA to put it nicely. I prefer the electric meggitt compressor until it’s time for the 300 hour brush change. That’s when I prefer the trans driven Liebherr dual compressor system. At least until the belt change comes due. I find it easier (less frustrating) to pull the compressors and do it on a table.



A lot of aviation bleeds into my vehicle maintenance. Whether it’s mileage, calendar time, or hours oil changes are done. I recently just changed oil on my tdi with literally 0 miles and 0 hours since the last change. It just reached calendar time. Probably an unnecessary expense, but it’s a habit. If it works for an engine spinning at 50,000 rpm, it will be ok for something that lives under 3k.



Back to the transmission. I’ll attach a picture of a chip detector and what it caught. Because of shape and size no action was required. I didn’t agree with it, but a subsequent flight yielded nothing else. I hope the OP gets his tranny issues worked out. Aside from the financial aspect, I’m sure it’s disheartening-especially if he had to do #3. Hopefully he pulled the pan and inspected the filters to see what kind, if any, debris was in the system. A used trans-especially one with supposedly 150k is a roll of the dice in my opinion. I believe 100% that’s what he was told.

It’s just impossible to know once it’s out of the truck, and on a shelf.
Thank you for your comment, definitely was rolling the dice with 150k but the pan was clean, magnet had minimal shavings and everything works well. The trucks on the road now and shifts great. Fingers crossed for a solid future. Thanks for your help

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #15
UPDATE

Still going strong, I believe the culprit was the tuning, The tune (SPD) had plenty of power an did its job, so NOT trashing them and their work, their product just didn't work for me. However I am now running a much milder tune from PHP, and very pleased with it, all shifts feel great, and power is there but certainly not dangerous. For anybody with similar issues, I recommend running a NON race tune. Obviously not meant for daily driving, I learned the hard way.
 
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