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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im looking to read what kind of service floor jacks you users recommend, As Im looking to purchase one for my husband who is a HEM and uses a old jack and am looking to UPGRADE the shops jack, safety is also a biggie too.
Just a little info too is this jack will be lifting anything from cars to lifted 1 ton trucks . So im excited to hear about your stories and past experiences with different companies, Google doesnt have much for reviews. :ford:
 

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I think you better put a price limit on this. Quality shop floor jacks can exceed $1000.

A 3 or 4 ton Craftsman floor jack works though.
 

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I have 2 craftsman floor jacks, I have had both of them for about 6/7 years and I haven't had to do anything to them and they still work great. I don't remember if they are 3 or 4 ton but they are darn heavy. Approx 90/100 lbs. I would think the aluminum ones would be nice but I couldn't justify the price difference. As far as safety goes I hope he uses jackstands, get him a good (and overbuilt) set of those. I use a 12 ton set.

All that being said you do get what you pay for.
I just figured out what HEM meant, What type of heavy equipment does he work on? a 3 or 4 ton may not be enough. IMHO This is one of those cases where overbuilt is the only way to go.

And like Doss asked, whats you budget?
 

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Napa floor jacks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Good morning, To answer some of the questions: Yes Jack stands are used, That also would be a nice upgrade too, lol. He also uses wheel Chalks as well.The jack i picture is a wide base not his skinny one, and this jack will used mainly for his 1 ton diesel (6" lift) so it has a good diststance to stretch . Slow release and not a fast drop also good wheels and not plastic. As for his work think OIL. And price range, I'm thinking around 400$ .
 

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My Craftsman has metal wheels and it is a beast to move around. Don't even look at aluminum jacks. Most of them are made for lighter weight vehicles (they are usually racing jacks) and can only lift 1-2 tons.

Anything that can't lift at least 3 tons is a waste of your time. The problem is lifting the front end which could put a 3 ton jack at its limits.

Usually jacks that are made for cars can't go high enough to lift a 4x4 adequately and ones that are made for trucks can't go low enough to get under a car.

Good jackstands are a must. Make sure they have a way to lock the stops (with a pin or similar).

Most guys I know that lift heavy equipment use bottlejacks and cribbing. It's a little bit of a pain to store and set up, but it's super effective.

I don't know your husband or his needs, but maybe something like a 4 ton Craftsman, 2 6-12 ton jackstands, and a couple of 10+ ton high lift bottlejacks will work well.
 

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i use this one from Napa... for the cars......not good for the truck though....i would not mind getting one for the truck also....
 

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I use the 4 ton jack from harbor freight. It has done everything I have asked it to do from lifting the truck up to pulling fence posts set in the ground with sakrete. If you can find a diesel or 4x4 magazine or maybe in your sunday paper, you can get a 20% off coupon and save about $30.
 
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