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problem with being overweight is, if you're in an accident, and the insurance investigators determine you were overloaded, they could well deny the claim, even if it was the other guys fault
not that I would endorse overloading
this topic comes up in the RV world often
for non-commercial your biggest threat would just be getting dropped after the settlements
not clicking your seatbelt is a decision made before an accident and can result in non payout , being overweight is most often just a mistake and having the ability to
verify compliance is not an easy task even for those in the know
so claiming intent would be difficult
 

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I used to go to a RV site and would argue with them about that stupid yellow sticker. So I went to a CHP weigh station and talked to a CHP officer that did trucks every day. He was more conserned with the load limit of the tires ans axles than the yellow sticker. If you get into a accident depending on the situation the RVer isn't always at fault. They don't come out there and put your junk on the scale and say you are overloaded unless it's obvious. I saw a Tundra pulling a 5th wheel a while back. The rear bumper was almost touching the ground. He went by me hauling. But other than being way over getting a ticket for being over not so much for the RVer unless it's obvious. For your own saftey just check your tires and the axle is on the white sticker.
 

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i have a 2001 SRW 4x4 ext cab long bed I use to tow my self built 20ft 12000lb tiny house. Have towed from NC to CA to WA. About 6k towed miles so far. Stock springs, wheels and GoodYear Trail Tires. Had cheap montoe shocks but switched to the stock height yellow bilsteins on both front and rear. Also switched front stabalizer shock to the silver bilstein. These changes made a smoother ride but not night and day. What made the biggest difference in ride height and long distance comfort we’re manual air bags in the rear. Priceless.


I am in the process of lowering a lifted F250 for the purpose of towing a 5th wheel.

I have a 2001 F250 SD crew cab, short bed, 4WD, 7.3L, auto trans. I bought the truck to tow a 5th wheel. The truck met my criteria in every respect but one. It came with a custom lift and oversized wheels and tires.

I have already corrected the wheels and tires. I went back to stock 16” Ford wheels for my model truck. The wheels are actually off of an Excursion. I then put stock tires on it. It now has Michelin Defender LTX M/S LT265/75 R16 tires on it.

I am planning on going back to stock level springs, but I am open to suggestions. My understanding is that, because the truck is 4WD, most 5th wheels are going to sit a little high in the front at stock truck height and going with any lift in the rear would only make it worse.

I will probably buy a 15 to 20 year-old 5th wheel trailer between 27 and 29 feet long with a dry weight around 8,000 lbs. and a GVW of 11-12,000 lbs. The hitch weight will be around 1,800 lbs.

I intend to add air bags in the rear and will probably go with Air Lift Load Lifter 5000 or Firestone 2071, but I am also open to recommendations.

Here are my questions:

Does anyone have any recommendations on spring manufacturers or resellers? So far, I have identified Michigan Truck Springs and SD Truck Springs.

Should I consider adding a few leaves? It appears that 4, 5 and 6 leaves are common.

Should I consider a 2” lift in the front?

Does anyone have recommendations on shocks? I currently have Bilsteins on the truck and have used them on a number of past vehicles. The truck rides a little too stiff for me, but that could be due to the springs. The truck currently has 6” Deaver springs in the front and Atlas springs in the back. I am not sure of the lift in the back, but the truck sits dead level, so I am guessing that it is a 4” lift.

Any recommendations on air bags?

Thanks in advance for any recommendations.
 

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i have a 2001 SRW 4x4 ext cab long bed I use to tow my self built 20ft 12000lb tiny house. Have towed from NC to CA to WA. About 6k towed miles so far. Stock springs, wheels and GoodYear Trail Tires. Had cheap montoe shocks but switched to the stock height yellow bilsteins on both front and rear. Also switched front stabalizer shock to the silver bilstein. These changes made a smoother ride but not night and day. What made the biggest difference in ride height and long distance comfort we’re manual air bags in the rear. Priceless.
I have done a couple cross country trips, On my first trip I stopped at around 26 places and every time I had to drag out the air comperssor. Mine had a 110 hook up do I would drag out a cord and air them up. When I got home the first thing I did was order the compressor. Now i just hit the button and air them up. Much better. I am planing a trip to Texas soon and there will be stops along the way.
 

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2001 F250 SD crew cab, short bed, 4WD, 7.3L, AFE intake, 4" exhaust, FTE resonator. Edge monitor
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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I want to thank all posters for their observations and recommendations. Here is my current status.

I mentioned that the truck currently has Deaver leaf springs with a 6” lift in the front. Jeff Deaver’s shop is about 40 minutes from me, so I took the truck down and had him look it over. Jeff recommended Dayton Springs, so that was good enough for me. He also gave me a list of other parts that I will need (stock pitman arm, sway bar end links and pan rod bar bracket).

I then talked with technical support at Dayton. I told the tech what I intended to use the truck for and how it would be loaded. Based on our discussion and the tech’s recommendations, I went with front springs rated at 2,630 lbs. each, because I am going to be running a winch and other accessories on the front. Because I will be carrying a tool box with 2-300 lbs. of tools and a 200 lb. hitch at all times and will have another 1,800 to 2,000 lbs. over the axles when I tow, I went with rear springs rated at 3,600 lbs. each.

The truck will sit at stock height.

The truck will probably ride stiffer than stock, but it is a 4WD truck. I will probably be OK with it if I don’t get the chatter that I currently get on some freeway surfaces.

I did not mention in this thread that I purchased the truck as a theft recovery vehicle and a number of items were missing when I acuired it, including the Fox suspension package, the air bags, the stereo, the tuner monitor, the last 8 ft. of the exhaust system, etc. Three of the four air bag brackets are still there.

I took the truck over to the local hitch specialist to have the owner check my installation job after I installed a used Pullrite SuperGlide 16K hitch and to have the hitch inspected as well. I apparently did a competent installation job and he said that the hitch looks to be in good condition. I had him look at the air bag brackets and he said that they are Firestone. If I can pick up a replacement bracket somewhere for the one that is missing, then I will probably go with Firestone air bags as I would only have to purchase the bags rather that the whole kit.

I am currently leaning towards Bilstein shocks, as I have run them on a number of vehicles and enjoyed their performance. I mentioned that to the hitch shop owner and he said that Bilsteins are what he is running on his truck. He tows a 38 ft. Jayco.

The springs are due in next week and I am researching the other parts. I have an acquaintance with a shop that has a lift who has agreed to help me lower the truck down.

I get a certain amount of satisfaction out of working on my own vehicles, but the research, leg work and actual work consume a lot of time. I guess that is the price you pay for always having to work within a limited budget.

Hopefully, the truck will be ready to tow by the middle of May.

I will eventually be looking to sell what will be a turn key high-end lift setup, so if any readers know someone looking to lift a 99-04 F250, give them my user name and have them contact me.

Thanks again for everyone’s input.
 

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I am in the process of lowering a lifted F250 for the purpose of towing a 5th wheel.

I have a 2001 F250 SD crew cab, short bed, 4WD, 7.3L, auto trans. I bought the truck to tow a 5th wheel. The truck met my criteria in every respect but one. It came with a custom lift and oversized wheels and tires.

I have already corrected the wheels and tires. I went back to stock 16” Ford wheels for my model truck. The wheels are actually off of an Excursion. I then put stock tires on it. It now has Michelin Defender LTX M/S LT265/75 R16 tires on it.

I am planning on going back to stock level springs, but I am open to suggestions. My understanding is that, because the truck is 4WD, most 5th wheels are going to sit a little high in the front at stock truck height and going with any lift in the rear would only make it worse.

I will probably buy a 15 to 20 year-old 5th wheel trailer between 27 and 29 feet long with a dry weight around 8,000 lbs. and a GVW of 11-12,000 lbs. The hitch weight will be around 1,800 lbs.

I intend to add air bags in the rear and will probably go with Air Lift Load Lifter 5000 or Firestone 2071, but I am also open to recommendations.

Here are my questions:

Does anyone have any recommendations on spring manufacturers or resellers? So far, I have identified Michigan Truck Springs and SD Truck Springs.

Should I consider adding a few leaves? It appears that 4, 5 and 6 leaves are common.

Should I consider a 2” lift in the front?

Does anyone have recommendations on shocks? I currently have Bilsteins on the truck and have used them on a number of past vehicles. The truck rides a little too stiff for me, but that could be due to the springs. The truck currently has 6” Deaver springs in the front and Atlas springs in the back. I am not sure of the lift in the back, but the truck sits dead level, so I am guessing that it is a 4” lift.

Any recommendations on air bags?

Thanks in advance for any recommendations.
I towed a 40' 5th wheel toy hauler (with an early Bronco in the back) for 14 years with my 02 F350. Here's my recommendations. FIRST get gauges. The pyrometer being the most important. When pulling heavy that gauge will safe your engine. As the exhaust temp goes up you can slow down, down shift the trans to keep the exhaust temps under 1300 degrees. A cool down timer is nice to cool down the exhaust temps before engine shut down. Oil burns at around 400 degrees and if you shut off the engine right away the oil left in the turbo will burn and turn to tar. Bushings/bearings will get so loaded up that the turbo will go south.
Next is "IF" the Prior owned hasn't done it, Up grade to a 6.0 trans cooler. It has 31 passed compared to the oem 9 pass cooler. Your trans and torque converter will thank you. When I installed my 6.0 cooler I didn't run it through the radiator also. Two reasons. If the trans is still run through the radiator it'll only cool to the thermostat temp in the engine. 190* In my case it's 203* (International recommends this temp ) Ford uses the 190* for lower hydrocarbons. Also, if you're pulling hard going up grades etc.you don't need to be adding more ATF heat to the radiator.
I have left my truck suspension stock and didn't have any problems with the 5th wheel Air bags are a must. Specially for a 250. As for the air compressor, I'd like to know where to mount one. I use a portable unit. I also keep the left and right bags separate from one another. Going around corners the outside bag will move air to the inside bag when they are shared. Trailer tires are a major pain. I blew the first one off at the 200 mile mark on a new rig. I went to truck tires Michelin XPS tires. They have steel belts in the side walls as well as the tread. I used them as my trailer was a triple axle rig that's hard on tires (Bronco didn't help matter either). Buy life time guaranteed shocks. I got mine from NAPA and replaced them more than once already. The trailer also had brakes on all 6 tires/wheels but it was still hard on the trucks brakes. Keep an eye on them at every tire rotation. Front brake rotors are the first to warp. It's cheaper to replace them than to have them turned now days.
5th Wheel trailers can be hard on short bed trucks (back windows etc). In turns the corner of the trailer can hit the truck. They make special 5th wheel hitches that will unlock and move backwards in turns. If you didn't get one you'll wished you did. I know a guy who has replaced the back glass twice.
Good Luck in your travels.
 

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Yeah either a slider hitch or somthing like a reese sidwinder pin box.

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I remember a driver who used to haul produce out of Mexico to the LA market and would stop at our Tucson truck stop for fuel and weight / load adjustment. The guy had a cabover Peterbilt with a V-12, twin screw plus a tag-along axle and an electronically controlled 5th wheel slider unit.Those boys at the scales couldn’t keep-up when he started shifting axle weights….lol. He lorded over the weight scales like a maestro conducting a symphony…lol.

This was back in ‘69 or ‘70 and he had a one-of-of-kind setup back in those days. That V-12 sounded so damn good!
 

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I have never used a slider. My B&W has enough adjustments so you don't need a slider. I have over 35,000 miles towing my 34' Montana
Does that mean that the pin is at centerline or forward of the axle also can you do 90deg turns ?

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2001 F250 SD crew cab, short bed, 4WD, 7.3L, AFE intake, 4" exhaust, FTE resonator. Edge monitor
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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Doubleslotted Flaps – If the truck was stock, I would have left the Ford springs there, although, as you and I discussed in earlier posts, F350 springs in the rear would be more appropriate than F250 springs for my intended use. The Daytons were a few hundred dollars cheaper than OEM. And Dayton seems to be one of the primary replacement leaf spring manufacturers for 18 wheelers, so I assume that they make a good product. Jeff Deaver is one of the most respected custom spring makers, so his recommendation of Daytons and the lower price are what convinced me.

Bart_3500 – Thanks for the recommendations.

I have already installed an Edge Insight Monitor and can monitor most of the relevant vitals. I will definitely be adding the egt sensor. I intend to install a PHP Hydra chip for improved HP and gas mileage, so I will definitely be monitoring egt, water and trans temps. I will not be going for a massive HP increase, just enough to get me up the hill. That being said, several of my favorite campgrounds in the Sierras are 7,500 foot elevation or higher.

I believe that the truck already has an upgraded trans cooler, but I will make certain. The recommendation on avoiding running it through the radiator is appreciated. I will also research cool down timers. That is the first time that I heard about those, so thanks.

The Pullrite Superglide 16K hitch that I installed is an automatic sliding hitch. Based on the research that I did, it was one of the highest recommended hitches for short bed trucks.

Thanks also for the air bag, tire and shock recommendations.

The F250 has 190K on the truck and 60K on a new motor and turbo. The prior owner towed a heavy toy hauler and had an Edge tuner on the truck. He bragged that he could brake 315 tires loose. He also blew up one of the more reliable engines on the planet at 130K. So, I am very cognizant of monitoring vitals. I believe in learning vicariously where possible, especially on big ticket issues. I received a file with some receipts and it cost $12.5K to replace the motor and turbo. A 7.3L with only 60K on the engine was the primary reason I bought this particular truck, along with the fact that met almost all of my other criteria: crew cab, short bed, 4WD with the exact color combination (white ext., gray int.) that I wanted. The fact that it had a high-end custom lift was the only major liability. I looked 6-7 years before I found this truck.

Given some of the hills that I am going to have to climb and then come back down, brakes are going to be a primary concern of mine. I will be back on this forum in a few months seeking posters recommendations about brakes. That will probably wait until I buy the 5th wheel and know exactly what I am working with.
 

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Given some of the hills that I am going to have to climb and then come back down, brakes are going to be a primary concern of mine. I will be back on this forum in a few months seeking posters recommendations about brakes.
[/QUOTE]I use Performance Friction pads. I have put over 400,000 miles on Performance Friction pads on 4 trucks in the mountains and hills all over with 10k+ trailers. Never had them fade. They are easy on the rotors. I have put over 170,000 miles on a set of rotors with the pads and didnt have a wear flange at the edge of the rotors. Those are the only pads I will use.
 
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My 03,6.0 is stock height. I have Timbrens and am very satisfied with them. My camper is 8,300 dry weight. I have the B&W Companion hitch I couldn’t ask for it to pull any better than it does.
 

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Does that mean that the pin is at centerline or forward of the axle also can you do 90deg turns ?

Sent from my LG-US996 using Tapatalk
If you look at the design of the B&W hitch the base distrubutes the weight across the bed of the truck. so it's designed to have the pin behind the rear end just a little. If you look through the hole in the bed where the hitch goes you will see that that hole is foreward of the rear end more like over the pumpkin. I have done enough 90 deg turns. and I have even done a 180 and still no issues. You don't make many 90 deg turns Like I said I have done this a lot. I have been to more than 70 places over about every mountain range in the country. I have even been on roads that I shouldn't even been on (stupid navigation) still towing the same RV. Time for a new one but with fuel prices as they are it will sit for a while longer.
 

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I took the truck over to the local hitch specialist to have the owner check my installation job after I installed a used Pullrite SuperGlide 16K hitch and to have the hitch inspected as well. I apparently did a competent installation job and he said that the hitch looks to be in good condition. I had him look at the air bag brackets and he said that they are Firestone. If I can pick up a replacement bracket somewhere for the one that is missing, then I will probably go with Firestone air bags as I would only have to purchase the bags rather that the whole kit.

I get a certain amount of satisfaction out of working on my own vehicles, but the research, leg work and actual work consume a lot of time. I guess that is the price you pay for always having to work within a limited budget.

Hopefully, the truck will be ready to tow by the middle of May.
Because you have a short bed truck you will need a slider hitch to properly tow a 5th wheel, it's most important to have when you have to back the trailer into a spot, it will keep you from crushing the rear of the cab on those tight turns in reverse.
The other thing is: because you have a short bed truck it can't tow as much weight as a long bed truck can, that's because the frame is shorter and you have less area to spread that weight due to having a shorter wheel base. Good luck with your build, hopefully you'll get to enjoy the fruits of your own labor before summer hits.
 

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I use Performance Friction pads. I have put over 400,000 miles on Performance Friction pads on 4 trucks in the mountains and hills all over with 10k+ trailers. Never had them fade. They are easy on the rotors. I have put over 170,000 miles on a set of rotors with the pads and didnt have a wear flange at the edge of the rotors. Those are the only pads I will use.
I have the same review/opinion on the Hawk “Superduty” line of pads.After trying my first set on my tundra I have been switching all of my vehicles over to them as needed. Also very easy on rotors, stop extremely smooth and so far have lasted at least double any previous pads. I tow a 17k lb 5th wheel and the difference with these pads was very noticeable.
 

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Because you have a short bed truck you will need a slider hitch to properly tow a 5th wheel, it's most important to have when you have to back the trailer into a spot, it will keep you from crushing the rear of the cab on those tight turns in reverse.
The other thing is: because you have a short bed truck it can't tow as much weight as a long bed truck can, that's because the frame is shorter and you have less area to spread that weight due to having a shorter wheel base. Good luck with your build, hopefully you'll get to enjoy the fruits of your own labor before summer hits.
I tow with a Short Bed.
 
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