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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2005 running really really rich at idle. 150k on it, deleted, factory tune. Everything by the numbers is perfect. Runs perfect no sticktion no missing although it is very very sluggish until it fully warms up and then it seems to quit smoking and has more power. No codes other than for the egr delete. No compression issues and a power balance checks out fine as well. Local dealership said injectors were bad and dumping fuel so they put a brand new set in it and it still runs exactly the same. You can drop each cylinder individually and it doesnt change the smoking/running rich. They dont know what is causing it and want to start throwing a bunch of parts at it. I dont like that idea nor do i want to pay for guesswork. It is a speed density truck and not a mass airflow. Has anyone had anything like this and what did you do to figure it out? Here is a pic of it idling, thats not oil smoke thats fuel.




Water Hood Wood Road surface Automotive exterior
 

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I keep my oil halfway between low and full because once at the full mark you can't easily tell how full it is. That "bulb" design wan't a good idea. I don't see how you can tell if there is any oil on the wire.
 

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Its at the full mark. Its not "making" oil
Using oil would be what we're looking for here, but excessively high oil levels can mess with the crankshaft and cause drivability and smoke concerns.

If the engine was "running rich" the smoke would be black or much darker than the picture shows. In fact, that smoke looks more like white smoke. Normally I think coolant however incomplete combustion will cause that as well. BTW, MAF signal is used to calculate the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and for fault detection, not fuel quantity or timing. If you are convinced this is not an oil or coolant usage concern this could be a fuel quality or air in the fuel issue. Other than that, you might want to check for an out of range sensor. Let the engine sit 8+ hours with no block heater operation. Check for an out of range temperature sensor: intake air temperature (IAT) sensor, manifold air temperature (MAT) sensor, engine oil temperature (EOT) sensor and engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor. All of those sensors should read within 12 degrees of each other, typically much closer than that. Then look at your pressure sensors: barometric pressure (BARO) manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor and exhaust back pressure (EBP) sensor. All of those should read atmospheric pressure and be within 1.5 psi of each other.

I have also seen bad FICMs cause white smoke. Usually that comes with other obvious symptoms.
 

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The convoluted way to get white(ish) smoke that I was wondering about was a HIGHLY contaminated oil with fuel. The CCV system will put that fuel rich mix into the intake fairly easily if the oil level is excessively high. The smoke would probably be a bit darker with that scenario I suppose.
 

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I think it should be said that diesel doesn't run "rich" or "lean", they just run. That would imply that you are losing efficiency. If you run "rich" in a diesel, you increase RPM as the only thing governing engine speed is fuel. Now overfueling is a thing, and that's black smoke. There isn't enough air to combust all the fuel in the chamber in overfueling.

But, you need to go and smell it and verify it is indeed fuel. if it is, then FICM could be a problem. Another thing a different member had was a cracked unison ring, which somehow managed to cause a lot of white smoke. A bad sealing injector can also cause white smoke.
 

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I agree on checking the temp sensors, they affect the engine timing, and that affects smoke
Also, what is the air temp? At cold temps most any engine will "smoke" when heating up the exhaust
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
But, you need to go and smell it and verify it is indeed fuel. if it is, then FICM could be a problem. Another thing a different member had was a cracked unison ring, which somehow managed to cause a lot of white smoke. A bad sealing injector can also cause white smoke.
It is indeed fuel. It isnt using/losing any coolant either. Just a weird situation. I will double check all the sensors for an out of range issue tomorrow.
 

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You called out the whole issue, its straight pipped and its trying to warm up.

Same things with a gas motor, run rich until you warm up.

Could be a sensor, could be a lazy injector, could need some archoil haha, but at the end of the day as long as it clears up at temp its working as designed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You called out the whole issue, its straight pipped and its trying to warm up.

Same things with a gas motor, run rich until you warm up.

Could be a sensor, could be a lazy injector, could need some archoil haha, but at the end of the day as long as it clears up at temp its working as designed.
I have had a dozen trucks that were strait piped. None did this. Thanks for the reply
 

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With certain temp and moisture in the air, I have seen diesels "smoke" while warming up - just like a gasser

Consider also the fuel - depending on where / when you got it, may make a difference in the burning quality

Checking those temp sensors and watch the timing pid may give a clue

Are you using ForScan to monitor?
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
With certain temp and moisture in the air, I have seen diesels "smoke" while warming up - just like a gasser

Consider also the fuel - depending on where / when you got it, may make a difference in the burning quality

Checking those temp sensors and watch the timing pid may give a clue

Are you using ForScan to monitor?
no, all i have is a cts monitor to check basic readings
 

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I have had a dozen trucks that were strait piped. None did this. Thanks for the reply
I hear the tone in your post, I wasnt trying to write off your problem but it may not be an issue, yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
You said running a tune. Does it act the same on all tunes? Higher HP tunes will demand more fuel/oil but wondering if your tunes are little crazy in the sense it shouldn't smoke like that even with a typical 100hp tune and everything else being fine.
No, i mentioned its the factory tune. Matter of fact Ford flashed it back to stock to make sure that there wasnt a tune creating the problem. Thanks
 

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no, all i have is a cts monitor to check basic readings
ForScan PC or Lite and a bluetooth adapter would be a great tool for your situation -- I have posted the info many times, so do a search should come right up
 
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