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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ok, this IS NOT another "clean your turbo" thread....this is to help show that when the mechanic says "yeah your turbo seals are shot and it needs replaced"...well....that's not always true. Now I know it can be a bit tricky, but if you're competent and confident to pull the turbo and clean it...with just a little more finesse, you can rebuild it and have it back to new for just a few hours more of your time and a couple extra bucks instead of that $600+ reman.....unless you want a sweet performance unit then I say go to town:D

So here's what I had....a turbo that I bought off a member here....his symptoms were low to no power, a lot of black smoke, and oil in the tailpipe. I bought the turbo guessing that the seals were bad and sure enough, that's what was wrong.....a quick recondition/rebuild and it spools better than the turbo I had in my '05 (this one has since taken its place). So without further ado....into the pics we go!

First....what it typically looks like when the seals go bad....a lot of coked oil that looks like it spun out of the housing. These pics were taken after disassembly to show it a bit better in the light



So! Apart it comes! For those who haven't done this before, the only thing I did before this pic was pull of the band, then I did the ever important line-up mark. This helps to get everything back in the exact spot as the factory had it so that your VGT system operates correctly.



Then, with a LOT of PB blaster and some time with a dead-blow hammer, I finally got it apart. The vanes moved ok.....but we'll get to them later



Not pictured is the removal of the compressor housing...it's pretty self explanatory though, just the 12pt 8mm bolts around the housing, then a tap with the dead blow if it needs it and it will pop right off. After that came the removal of the compressor wheel....this turbo didn't have much taken off the turbine side for balance, so a 6pt 7/8 socket fit great! Then a spin off with the impact brought the wheel off....if this is your first time doing this the threads are left-hand thread!



Now the compressor plate looks like this



Again, using the 12pt 8mm, remove the 4 bolts....note the orientation of the arrow, since you'll be reinstalling it back that way as well



OK, now its time to make damn well sure that everything stays clean and doesn't get in the turbo



Sometimes the outer seal and thrust bearing will come out with the compressor plate....if they don't just lift them off the shaft:)



Once you're to this point, another small tap on the tip of the shaft will set it free to be pulled out the back end.

 

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watching !!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Just a small lightning fire....we got it out around 4 before it got all wild and out of control :D:D:D

ow...back to the turbo...ok where were we....ok, so with the turbine shaft removed from the housing, you can see two problems with this turbo...one, the rear oil seal has been leaking for some time, causing deposits of coked oil/carbon...and two, the combination of high deposits and a wearing bearing allowed the inside of the turbine wheel to have some wear. However, it's only surface wear and should be ok once cleaned up, but we'll come back to that in a minute. Don't get this confused with what's normally taken off for balancing purposes though and go crazy. Anything more than a non-scarring brush shouldn't be used.



One bearing came out with the shaft this time...if that happens, just turn the housing at a down angle and pull out the other bearing...don't forget the spacer too!



Ok, here's a quick screw up for me....I cleaned the crud off of the rear cover before I took the pic :doh:.....just imagine for a second that the rear cover is completely covered in burnt oil and carbon deposits....now with that said, clean the crud out of the torx heads so you can remove the cover



Rear cover removed.....there's all that junk



With a pick, some carb/throttle body cleaner and a lint free rag, the inside can be cleaned of deposits for a good seal



The small circle inside the hole is where the turbo oil seal sits and rides. The oil seals on a turbo seal up like a piston ring, so without cleaning the mating surface even a new seal will leak, cause you to blow smoke, and just add to the frustration :banghead:



I used my Dremel tool with a fine stainless wire wheel. This allowed me to use the smaller wheel and keep everything slow and controlled, without letting debris get into the housing. With a bit of time and patience, it all comes off.





With the housing all cleaned up and ready to accept the turbine shaft and new bearings, the rear cover goes back on. Just good and snug is all you need. They're small bolts so they'll break if you try to go too tight.


Ok, moving back to the turbine shaft, it's time to pull off the old seal. Remember, its like a piston ring, so it's made out of spring steel and you don't want to warble the shape. I used the pick to get underneath it, then just used my fingers to walk it the rest of the way off..just be careful not to mar the shaft with your pick/choice of instrument.



There's the main problem.....the spring steel has lost it's tension and doesn't make a good seal anymore. Your $600+ problem was all due to a $0.25 part :doh:

 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
With the seal removed, now it's time to clean the deposits from the shaft. I used a nylon brush on the end of my Dremel and it did a great job. If the deposits are harder to get off and the nylon doesn't cut it, a brass wheel/wire brush can be used. Just DO NOT USE STEEL on the shaft. It may become scratched/marred and your turbo bearing life will plummet.



Getting there....


All clean:) I did use the brass brush in this instance to clean the back side of the turbine .



Now it's time for new parts!!!!! Available at your local Garrett distributor, ebay, etc....



The new seal goes on like the other came off, just work it back and forth with your fingers until it snaps into place. Don't take a lot of time on working it over the larger end, since it is spring steel it will try to enlarge its shape to the larger diameter. Also not shown was how I got the shaft clean....this was just with a rag soaked with brake cleaner and spun in my hand...it did a great job and the brake cleaner evaporates, so you don't have to worry about it contaminating your new bearings.



Just like when building an engine....pre assembly lubrication is crucial! Some T6 5w-40 synthetic works great:D but any motor oil will work as long as its clean:thumb:



The turbine shaft is cleaned/lubed, so the new bearings go on. The kit I got did not come with a new spacer, but some of them do



Moving back to the housing, don't forget to replace this O-ring before assembly



Once you have everything ready, slide the turbine shaft in from the exhaust side. Try as best you can to point the gap of the seal "up" so that upon first startup, smoke is minimal. As it slides in, put some pressure on it and give it a good bump with your hand. You will hear a "click" or a small snap....that is your new oil seal snapping into it's seat:thumb:

 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
New thrust bearing and outer seal/oil slinger:D Also shown is the outer oil seal for the compressor housing side. It snaps into it's place on the neck of the slinger that slips through the compressor plate.



Make sure again that you get it pre-lubed....try to fill all the little holes





Installed in the housing and ready for the compressor plate:thumb:



Re-install the compressor plate in the same orientation it was before (remember I told you to look at the arrow). When you have the orientation correct, the bolts go in and get torqued to 12 ft-lbs. Then comes your compressor wheel, which gets spun on and then torqued to 10 ft-lbs. Now....for balance control you can make a line-up mark on the wheel and the shaft before disassembly. That would ensure you get it back in the correct place. However, the way our compressor wheels are externally balanced (meaning they are balanced/shaved before the get installed onto the rotating assembly) it's never something I have personally worried about. Now before everyone gets in a big flaming fit, I'm not saying this is the correct 100% Ford stamped approved method, but it has worked fine for me over the years fiddling with turbos.



HAHAHAHA^^^ just noticed that when I took that picture I had the torque setting on 25.....THIS IS NOT CORRECT! Torque the wheel onto the shaft at 10 FT-LBS.

Ok, now we're back to usually where everyone else leaves off....and you didn't think I was going to do all this work and then NOT clean/lube the vanes did you? :doh: Unison ring looks good



All cleaned, lubed, and ready:thumb:



Putting the pieces back together, making sure they're lined up perfectly



Then bolt the compressor housing back on and there you have it! Your $600+ problem was just solved with a $100 rebuild kit and a couple hours of your time



I'll be happy to answer questions/thoughts. Hopefully this sheds some light on exactly what happens when a turbo usually goes "bad". I did not dive into the VGT part of the turbo for a couple reasons. One, it was not the primary cause of concern on this turbo; and two; other than the solenoid controlling the actuator arm, I haven't played with them a lot and wouldn't want to come off trying to sound like an expert on the subject :lol: We're all human and we all make mistakes, so if you see any I have made here, feel free to point them out! Hopefully it was at least a good read and will show some people how to DIY a blown seal problem:D
 

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Where's the shiny compressor housing?!
 

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Great write-up. I know it's not easy to document everything as you go and you did a great job. I was going to pull my turbo and clean the unison ring and vanes soon, but I might just do this now instead!
 

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I'm glad someone finally did a write-up on this. Great write-up and pix. I could have used this 4 months ago. I couldn't find a good write-up anywhere, and definitely not one that was specific to a 6.0. This confirms that my turbo may live a while. Good job!:)
 

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FYI there is a 360* thrust bearing kit as well. I'm certain your pics show a 270* kit. I believe the 360* is supposed to give more support.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Where's the shiny compressor housing?!
LOL.....it will be polished now that I know it works well :D:D:D

I'm glad someone finally did a write-up on this. Great write-up and pix. I could have used this 4 months ago. I couldn't find a good write-up anywhere, and definitely not one that was specific to a 6.0. This confirms that my turbo may live a while. Good job!:)
Thanks guys for all your support on this. I hadn't seen any thread like this either...there's a few out there around the net, but none that are pic heavy and show the whole picture, which is what I tried to do here:thumb:

FYI there is a 360* thrust bearing kit as well. I'm certain your pics show a 270* kit. I believe the 360* is supposed to give more support.
Yes you're correct, it was just the standard 270* kit...I've heard that the 360 kits are out there, but just going as a direct replacement I went this route!:icon_ford:
 

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FWIW, you may give Gary and Nate a shout and ask them about their bronze thrust washers. Theirs were eaten up and destroyed with less than 500 miles on them. My guess is the material composition had something to do with it. Nate called me right after I did this with mine and fortunately I still had my steel thrust washer so that's what go re-installed. I would HIGHLY suggest using the steel thrust washer and even more so going with the 360 degree washer.
 

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Great job Nick you explained this very well.
 

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FWIW, you may give Gary and Nate a shout and ask them about their bronze thrust washers. Theirs were eaten up and destroyed with less than 500 miles on them. My guess is the material composition had something to do with it. Nate called me right after I did this with mine and fortunately I still had my steel thrust washer so that's what go re-installed. I would HIGHLY suggest using the steel thrust washer and even more so going with the 360 degree washer.
Do know where to get the 360* washer Shack ?
Also do they make one for the powermax ?

Thanks.
 
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