Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,483 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, I am going to get some new tires. Thinking of some 35x12.5x20". Also, I need a new rear diff. Now and then she is a 1 wheel drive, that dont work with the amount of dirt and snow driving I do. But I also do about 20k each year on the street. So a ture locker wont work.

Has anyone used an air or electric locker? Pros and cons?

Give me your feedback if you have one!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,344 Posts
i don't have any experience on the super duty, but my buddy has an air locker on his jeep wrangler. He says its really nice but the real Mcoy is the electronic locker. Might be more money but he says if he could do it all over again, for sure electronic.

Only thing I was thinking, if you went air then you could have an on board compressor as a bonus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,483 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
i don't have any experience on the super duty, but my buddy has an air locker on his jeep wrangler. He says its really nice but the real Mcoy is the electronic locker. Might be more money but he says if he could do it all over again, for sure electronic.

Only thing I was thinking, if you went air then you could have an on board compressor as a bonus.
Thanks for the imput.

Yea I am looking at all options and really only have another few weeks that I can do the job. The truck is too big to work on in the garage and I need to get this done before we get hammered with the white stuff. :thumb:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,700 Posts
so a truetrac is out of the question? while a locker may be a little more failsafe a trutrac is going to give you extra grip all the times when you think you don't need it.

I only just installed mine but I can already tell it makes a world of difference when you get on a little gravel or when the roads are wet
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,344 Posts
Already snow on the ground where I am, north slope of alaska
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
404 Posts
Air locker is best in my opinion. I have ran them in 2 Toyota rigs I have built ( V6 Four linked on all corners Dana 60 rock crusher axles, and to many mods to list on the T-Case and stuff) We Had major issues with the electric on a build we did.. ARB all the way.

I live right out side of where the world famous Rubicon is. I ditched high school to go four wheel up there @ 16 when all we could afford was the Lincoln locker lol (Spider gears welded together). Once I grew up and actually had funds to build a rig we tried them all you name it and nothing held a candle to the ARB air locker.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,434 Posts
I have full time detroit, had in in AK for years(snow/ice), now Vegas, towed a huge trailer down the ALCAN in dead of winter. Very street-able, don't even know its back there.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,814 Posts
I would think that the dirt/snow/gravel that you run on, something a little more on the automatic side would be better. Maybe a Detriot or something similar. I think the ARB is great but it looks to me like you need something that will help keep you out of trouble as much as get you out of trouble. Let us know what you decide and how your install goes.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,700 Posts
Personally I would only want an electric locker for the front
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
404 Posts
I do not think anyone makes a electric for our trucks.... That is why everyone does the ARB air locker. I agree with Jetjock, a Detroit is fine, if you are not driving country roads that are windy or Canyon roads. If you are the Detroit is full engaged all the time meaning both tires are forced to spin at the same RPM all the time. So going around a turn when the inner slows and the outer speeds up is not possible. You end up getting a squealing sound and some tire hop.... ARB might be allot of money but well worth it. It strength testing they test right at the top, and you can have it on or off when ever. Not only that you will have on board air now if you ever need it.... it comes in handy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
A detroit locker is NOT locked all the time. It is an automatic locking differential, it locks when power is applied to it. It still allows you to make turns without chirping tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
404 Posts
I don't know what roads you drive but on country road and canyon roads out where I live you don't take your foot off the throttle, so it is locked all the time. I have them in all 5 of my toyotas and any little bit of gas and it stays engaged, if your idle is set to high it triggers engagment... My bad on the eaton when did they come out with that?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
The NoSPIN differential powers both wheels. Yet
freely permits wheel speed differentiation when
required.
Prime functions
1. Assures 100% of the available torque and
increases drawbar pull.
2. Prevents wheel spin and power loss when one
wheel loses traction.
3. Compensates for differences in wheel travel
when turning or operating on uneven
surfaces.
The drive axle illustrated below (Fig. 1) is equipped
with a NoSPIN differential. Note that there are no
spider gears, but rather two drive members, called
driven clutch assemblies. They mate with a spider
assembly which is driven by the ring gear through
the differential support case.
As long as the vehicle is operated in a straight
forward or reverse direction over a smooth surface,
the driven clutch assemblies remain locked to the
spider assembly.
The NoSPIN differential allows the vehicle to perform
as if the axle half-shafts had been welded - the axle is
completely locked. This means both wheels turn at the
same speed. If one wheel loses traction or leaves the
ground, the opposite wheel, which still has traction,
continues to drive the vehicle until traction is regained
by both wheels. There can be no one wheel spinout.
(Fig. 2)
When the vehicle turns a corner, or when one wheel
passes over an obstruction, the outside wheel, or the
wheel passing over the obstruction, must travel a
greater distance and therefore faster than the other
wheel. When this occurs, the NoSPIN differential
automatically allows for the necessary difference in
wheel speed.
During a turn (Fig. 1), the inside driven clutch remains
completely engaged with the spider and continues to
drive the vehicle. The outside driven clutch
automatically disengages from the spider, allowing
the outer wheel to turn freely in the turn. When the
vehicle completes the turn, the outside driven clutch
automatically reengages the spider, as both wheels
again travel at the same speed.

^^^ That is out of the Detroit locker manual. I know mine in my ranger is barely noticeable even in the tightest turns. You have to really get on the throttle to make it chirp the tires. It has never let me down off the road which is mostly where that truck gets used.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
A detroit locker is always locked under power, its teeth are always engaged. As soon you are turning (one side going faster than the other) and the outside wheel has traction (in order for the gears to "pop" out via a cam-like mechanism) it will have usable power to the inside wheel only. As soon as you are back to equal wheel speed does the cam disengage the freewheel on the outside gear and lock the gears all together. Semi truck drivers (loggers) want the detroit lockers removed in the winter because their trucks tend to want to go straight when turning in a slippery environment.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top