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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, They certainly look nice. Fixed a clunk in the front end(must have been fubared rotor or loose caliper)
Brake pedal feels smoother and fuller if that makes sense, but it feels like i need more brake pressure to get the bite on the rotor.
not sure if i still have air in the system, but has anyone installed this kit and noticed better grab as you put on initial break in miles?

i did about (5) 75-0 hard brakes, looked like i had some pad transfer to the rotor. sure smelled like it.
My reason for posting is that i dont feel 100% like i have as much performance over fubar stock setup as i thought i would.


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those pads will eventually bed in and you wont need more pressure on the pedal.
With a truck this big, you wont have more performance over stock because all your really changed was the material of the pad. The whole system is still the same.
 

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Same kit and lines on my 6.4. I think whats happening is the pads need to be heated up more since the compound is designed to work at a higher temp. I definitely feel them working better at the bottom of grades or aggressive stop-and-go traffic.
 

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Powerstop pads I feel are a HUGE improvement over stock. Their rotors and calipers I didn't find anything special about but they hold up well. Not be be picky too but you didn't follow their brake pad break in procedure anyways so it may take them longer to "set" in. When I changed to their performance rotor/pad combo it was a night and day difference and nearly 30k later still is with almost zero brake dust.

For reference here is what Powerstop says to do and although I didn't follow it 100% on another car I did for the truck and felt a big difference positively.

Break in your PowerStop Brakes as follows:

5 moderate to aggressive stops from 40 mph down to 10 mph in rapid succession without letting the brakes cool and do not come to a complete stop. If you鈥檙e forced to stop, either shift into neutral or give room in front so you can allow the vehicle to roll slightly while waiting for the light. The rotors will be very hot and holding down the brake pedal will allow the pad to create an imprint on the rotor. This is where the judder can originate from.

Then do 5 moderate stops from 35 mph to 5 mph in rapid succession without letting the brakes cool. You should expect to smell some resin as the brakes get hot.

After this is complete, drive around for as long as possible without excessively heating the brakes and without coming to a complete stop (Try for about 5 minutes at moderate speed). This is the cooling stage. It allows the heated resin in the brake pads to cool and cure.

After the brakes have cooled to standard operating temperature, you may use the brakes normally.
 

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That sounds like it could be good for any and all brakes for a good break-in.


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now that you say that, i do recall a thread about these pads needing some heat....it was disputed, but it could certainly be factual
Its common knowledge that performance pads require higher temps to work better (friction and wear coefficients). The question here i guess would be how much and you would need to know the makeup of the compound which i doubt is available. The link below is an example of temp ranges.
 

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The brakes are over-leveraged with those tires鈥擱otor Scrub Radius vs. Tire Rolling Radius. OE friction material and some high-end pads do not need a break-in; they have been kept in an oven for a post-bake cycle to better cure the material to achieve friction right off the parking lot for the consumer's test drive. With the cheaper aftermarket linings, you become the oven. In 30 years of working in the brake industry, I know no aftermarket friction materials that get the extensive OE oven cure.

Running larger tires increases the leverage of the tires (cheater bar) and slows the rotation of the rotors for a given stopping distance, increasing the thermal input for a given pie slice. An aftermarket "break-in" should be done at a lower speed than stated not to fade the material during the work. And no more stops or snubs than told to do.

There's no common situation where the temperature range is a specified amount; every friction material compound will have its bell curve. The typical drive of a non-commercial truck is in the 150-200潞F rotor range. You pick higher metallic compounds if you want to run heavy or hard. And large tires are a hard run.

I've shown this data before; 2005 F350 SRW weighed to full GVW.

Day 5; Inner City traffic with tight stop and go sections, slow speeds, and little cooling air drive the temps up; highway runs are cooler. 86.7 brake applications per hour in an 8-hour shift for approximately 200 miles; cool down at lunch and 9:00 am/1:30 15 min breaks.

City-type driving can be higher in brake temperature than some canyon work. City cabs typically burn up brakes. Those peaks at 8 am and 11:30 are running 10 to 20 mph, stop and go. No high energy.

Rectangle Font Line Slope Parallel


Day 10 Town/Surburban traffic at GVW; starts off in-town, running Jersey Shore to Elizabeth and back, not exactly light-duty; speeds, brake applications total and per hour similar. However, 1:30p to 2:30p are light town traffic with stops lights, just wider apart at 40mph, and the temperature range is more like most people do. One 15 minute break in the morning and later lunch, cool-down curves apparent.

Rectangle Font Line Parallel Slope



The point is, if you want to know what your driving characteristics are brake temp-wise, it's an easy tell with an infrared gun. Trying to find out the bell curve of particular friction material, that's another story! And why some people say a specific product is excellent, while others say it sucks鈥攖he OE-developed lining target a wide range and characteristics, which is why they are more expensive. But when you modify the truck with larger tires, you become part of the R&D community.
 

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I always appreciate your seasoned input on brakes.


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