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Just a Husband and Dad
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97 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
All. I performed a very unscientific test of plugging in the engine block heater and not plugging it in for two nights in a row. The overnight temps were in the low twenties and almost identical. Just wanted to throw some fuel and perspective on the debate. :|

 

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Coming out of the older motors I'd say a block heater helps much more with cold starts. After the last few years with my 6.7L it seems to not "need" the block heater use to help with early morning starts. My experiences say we need a transmission pan heater over a engine block heater. Maybe 2020?? LOL
 

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I've found that the block heater isn't necessary down to at least zero. Both of my 6.7s have started very well in cold weather. They naturally turn a bit slow when its in the single digits.
Now, my 7.3... Where did my wife hide that extension cord?
 

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How long was it plugged in? i have my 7.3 on a timer for 1.5 hours and it starts like a summer day down to 20 degrees. below that takes a little more effort from the starter.
 

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FYI, you can add the digital temp above coolant gauge with a few keystrokes in Forscan. Similar to the DTE line above the fuel gauge.
 
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honestly to me this is one of the better tests showing plugged in vs not. Sure people wil argue temp, driving habit, blah blah blah. but in reality it showed that with the engine plugged in that it wasnt working as hard to maintain the speeds that you were traveling.

honestly this would be cool to test with the older trucks as well. i may have to do this with my 6.0L if texas ever decides to get cold and stay cold longer than 5 hours
 

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Just a Husband and Dad
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97 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
honestly to me this is one of the better tests showing plugged in vs not. Sure people wil argue temp, driving habit, blah blah blah. but in reality it showed that with the engine plugged in that it wasnt working as hard to maintain the speeds that you were traveling.

honestly this would be cool to test with the older trucks as well. i may have to do this with my 6.0L if texas ever decides to get cold and stay cold longer than 5 hours
Thank you very much! Yes, I wanted to show if the engine was more efficient/working harder if being plugged in. I plugged it in the night before so 6+ hours plugged in on 22-23 degree nights.

FYI, you can add the digital temp above coolant gauge with a few keystrokes in Forscan. Similar to the DTE line above the fuel gauge.
Thank you. I have been meaning to set it up that way, I honestly have just been procrastinating. :nerd:
 

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I've heard/read on several occasions over the years where engine manufacturers n motor oil producers had determined that sumthin like 70-80% of engine wear comes from cold starts. I'm not a scientist n I haven't dun any of the studies, so I can't tell u that it's 100% true. But when the temps get down in the single digits n my pickups are plugged in, the 7.3 reads 68° oil temp n the 6.7 reads 39° oil temp, I kno things are nice n toasty under the hood. N I am fully aware that the oil in the pan is not that warm, but the oil on most of the bearings is probably close. Maybe I'm just OCD, but if its below freezin I'm plugged in
 

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SUCK SQUEEZE BANG BOOM
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Just cuz the engine starts don't mean it's happy starting when not plugged in. How long does it take to get oil to the turbo. Check out your fuel pulse width and timing. Over fueling causes more oil dilution. In Canada the 6.7's have a habit of spinning the main bearings and grenading turbos when started cold. Save fuel and protect your engine. PLUG THE GODDAMN THING IN!!
 
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