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If you're watch ECT while you're driving on the highway as it's warming up, once you hit ~194, you should see it stick there for 10 seconds or so, then drop back down to 190-192. That shows your thermostat has opened and is now circulating through the radiator.

I can see mine do it every time.

Yeah, i'd be suspect of the oil cooler as well if I couldn't find documentation.

-jokester
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
If you're watch ECT while you're driving on the highway as it's warming up, once you hit ~194, you should see it stick there for 10 seconds or so, then drop back down to 190-192. That shows your thermostat has opened and is now circulating through the radiator.

I can see mine do it every time.

Yeah, i'd be suspect of the oil cooler as well if I couldn't find documentation.

-jokester
Mine rarely goes above 189 while driving normally, only really goes over when under a decent amount of load.
 

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2005 F250 FX4 Lariat CCSB - ARP studs, EGR deleted, IPR coolant filter
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What were the temps like before the steep uphill section?
 

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There's a good chance your SCT scanner isn't capable of scanning the PCM. I had the same issue with mine. My truck was broken down with a failed HPOP (amongst other things) and according to my SCT no codes were present which drove me nuts. I then invested in a better platform for diagnostics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
What were the temps like before the steep uphill section?
Coolant wasn’t much different maybe 185, but the oil was around 207 before the hill. Normally when driving that route back home, I don’t go over 195 oil temp before the hill and no more than 204 ish once I get to the top.

There's a good chance your SCT scanner isn't capable of scanning the PCM. I had the same issue with mine. My truck was broken down with a failed HPOP (amongst other things) and according to my SCT no codes were present which drove me nuts. I then invested in a better platform for diagnostics.
I’ve read codes with it many times before it actually seems pretty decent, but I also have the torq pro app with the wireless obd2 transmitter maybe I’ll try that this weekend
 

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If it were me, I'd throw a t-stat in there just because. It's not gonna solve your issue, but it'll bring your temps up a bit.

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2005 F250 FX4 Lariat CCSB - ARP studs, EGR deleted, IPR coolant filter
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185 to 207 is a 22 degree delta. That is pretty steep for easy running.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
185 to 207 is a 22 degree delta. That is pretty steep for easy running.
I’m aware, and again this essentially started happening out of nowhere, the day before this started my temps were great no problems then the next day i drive with my plow on once and now every time I’ve driven the truck since the oil gets hot. I’m no expert but I would Atleast assume I’d see the temps get worse over a period of time if the cooler was clogged or becoming clogged no?
 

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Eited

Just reread your 1st post. I missed the fact that it's doing it without the plow on as well.

Is there a bracket for the plow that stays on the truck? If so, have you removed it as well to see if it changes things?

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
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Just reread your 1st post. I missed the fact that it's doing it without the plow on as well.

Is there a bracket for the plow that stays on the truck? If so, have you removed it as well to see if it changes things?

-jokester
Only thing that stays on the truck are the mounts that are bolted to the frame, once I take the plow off there’s nothing infront of the truck just the 2 square tube mounts under the front bumper which don’t block any air flow to the rad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 · (Edited)
So a quick update to my situation, I spent the day doing a back flush on the oil cooler along with fresh coolant. I also installed a new mishimoto coolant filter kit as my old one was leaking and I had to delete it. When I backflushed it a **** ton of this flakey looking stuff which I believe was casting sand came out and now I’m seeing 5-10 degree deltas and my oil didn’t even go over 197 after a hill climb. Hopefully this lasts long enough for me to get a nice new cooler. Thank you everyone for your help!
 

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So a quick update to my situation, I spent the day doing a back flush on the oil cooler along with fresh coolant. I also installed a new mishimoto coolant filter kit as my old one was leaking and I had to delete it. When I backflushed it a **** ton of this flakey looking stuff which I believe was casting sand came out and now I’m seeing 5-10 degree deltas and my oil didn’t even go over 197 after a hill climb. Hopefully this lasts long enough for me to get a nice new cooler. Thank you everyone for your help!
Just curious. You say it looked like casting sand. What did it feel like?

When I backflushed mine, I got a lot of stuff that looked a bit like sand, but was a lot softer - easily crushed between my fingers.
 

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Casting sand is well, ...sand
I'm sure you have been to the beach
there are additives that make the sand stick together for making castings
and sometimes some burned sand is left in the casting corners and nooks
 

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When our engines were cast, they probably used phenol-formaldehyde as the binding resin for the sand. It might be flaky.

An opportunity to show the facility I worked the first five years at Abex when developing new automotive friction materials, Friction Material Research building. But the reason for showing it, the excellent Superfund site of old casting sand from the two foundries.

Property Plant Ecoregion Tree Land lot


Back to the main point. After my engine was on the engine stand for too long, I wanted to see how much rust was developing in the open water jacket areas with my borescope. While moving through, I came across several areas that still had sand attached to the casting; this was the most photogenic.


From my understanding, it's called a bridge, a space where the sand molds do not fit perfectly, so the casting metal bridges that area, in this case, between two cylinder walls. This is remarkable to me, as it stayed after the original block cleaning process, life in one truck, gone through the cleaning process at the rebuilder's facility (not that good, BTW), and through 75k miles of my use.


Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18 Show Content
Water Automotive tire Grey Tints and shades Metal


Edit - I'm guessing the forum is labeling this sensitive because of the shock of casting sand in the block to new owners.

Water Liquid Fluid Atmospheric phenomenon Freezing



I was able to get rid of it and the other examples, all of which were only in the driver's side water jacket. So probably a bad mix of resin for those molds. I made a plate to seal off the water jacket, filled each side with Evapo-Rust, let it sit for 24 hours, and then set up my garden hose to do a full pressure flush. Which of those two things took care of it, I can't say. The water flow resembles what SRMasterTech shows in a video goosing the throttle to get a high flow when flushing the coolant.

What it looked like afterward.

Purple Azure Violet Petal Water


There's a 6.0L YouTuber who says there can never be casting sand. Yeah, there can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Just curious. You say it looked like casting sand. What did it feel like?

When I backflushed mine, I got a lot of stuff that looked a bit like sand, but was a lot softer - easily crushed between my fingers.
So it wasn’t identical to normal sand grains, it was more flat little flakes roughy 1/16 to 1/32 of an inch in size. A few may have been slightly larger but not by much. It was also definitely not rust flakes, it wasn’t rust colored at all i assumed it was casting sand because of the color and texture but I could be wrong. It definitely felt interesting, some were kind of soft and some were much more gritty feeling. There might still be some left over in my drain pan I can try to get a picture of.
When our engines were cast, they probably used phenol-formaldehyde as the binding resin for the sand. It might be flaky.

An opportunity to show the facility I worked the first five years at Abex when developing new automotive friction materials, Friction Material Research building. But the reason for showing it, the excellent Superfund site of old casting sand from the two foundries.

View attachment 781020

Back to the main point. After my engine was on the engine stand for too long, I wanted to see how much rust was developing in the open water jacket areas with my borescope. While moving through, I came across several areas that still had sand attached to the casting; this was the most photogenic.


From my understanding, it's called a bridge, a space where the sand molds do not fit perfectly, so the casting metal bridges that area, in this case, between two cylinder walls. This is remarkable to me, as it stayed after the original block cleaning process, life in one truck, gone through the cleaning process at the rebuilder's facility (not that good, BTW), and through 75k miles of my use.


View attachment 781021

Edit - I'm guessing the forum is labeling this sensitive because of the shock of casting sand in the block to new owners.

View attachment 781022


I was able to get rid of it and the other examples, all of which were only in the driver's side water jacket. So probably a bad mix of resin for those molds. I made a plate to seal off the water jacket, filled each side with Evapo-Rust, let it sit for 24 hours, and then set up my garden hose to do a full pressure flush. Which of those two things took care of it, I can't say. The water flow resembles what SRMasterTech shows in a video goosing the throttle to get a high flow when flushing the coolant.

What it looked like afterward.

View attachment 781023

There's a 6.0L YouTuber who says there can never be casting sand. Yeah, there can.
It’s definitely very interesting to me how a little chunk of sand like that can stay in a block for so long after driving it and multiple cleaning processes. I’d like to use one of those bore scopes on mine to see how much is still left in the block. Very cool facility by the way! Sounds like a very interesting job
 

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I was at that facility for five years before taking the management position at vehicle testing. One hundred miles away but closer to home.

That was the research center for all of the company's divisions. Railroad trackwork and carriage, the cast products group that made a wide range of products, friction products where we developed brake lining from motorcycles to railroad cars and locomotives, Dennison hydraulics, Abex Aerospace hydraulics, the most extensive collection of brake dyno's in the world under one roof. Signal Stat had been sold off before I got there. However, the equipment was still there and used by the electronics lab, and SK Wellman had just been sold off, which made aircraft brakes, a division from them later became Hawk.

The experimental foundry next door also had contracts to cast nuclear ballistic sub missile hatches and some parts of the Abrams tank. Of course, those areas were off-limits unless you had clearance, but the equipment they had to find casting flaws and measure the surfaces after the experimental machine shop finished their work was impressive.

The neatest thing about being there is you could walk across the parking lot and interface with the most knowledgeable people in those industries. If you had a problem with a rotor or truck brake drum, you could talk to metallurgists with Phds who had patents on alloys and casting processes. You had a machining issue, walk over to the Experimental Machine Shop where the shop supervisor had a BA in mechanical engineering, reporting to a man I later reported to, who had a Master in Engineering from MIT. We also had quarterly reviews, where the groups would talk about challenges and corrections, so you would have so much insight into areas you were not involved in. Similar to when I went to SAE Brake Colloquiums, however, everyone was open instead of holding back essential details (because of competitors). One year there was better than fours years of graduate school; these were the guys who got things done.

After moving to vehicle testing, the company made a wrong move during the recession. It lost enough money that IC Industries sold Abex off to a holding company, which then broke the divisions apart to sell them off. In time, the research center was disbanded, and what happens typically under that situation, not everyone continues employment. You would hear of some of the people I held in the highest regard leaving the new company and staying where they lived, taking a position that did not fully utilize their capabilities.

That was my first experience of a company being dismembered by a holding company, and I saw what a technological loss it was. But, unfortunately, it was not my last experience. I know Romney, during his campaign, said of the process it was saving companies, but at a considerable cost in my view.
 

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I found this when I cut apart the oil cooler from the reman block of 75k. I never figured out what it was, but not sand. Over the 75k, the differential between the oil and coolant temps spread wider, which you would expect if the intake port of the oil cooler was getting blocked. Cutting open the plate area of the cooler, with the ELC there was no silicate gelling.

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I found my other pictures after I cleared away the aluminum chips from cutting. Flow restriction was all from the intake port being clogged, the main plates clear.


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