Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am really happy with my 2018 6.7 F350, but wondering if it is really a truck to keep for the long haul. At under 41K miles its on its 3rd DPF. First two replaced under bumper-to-bumper, last one just went in at 39K out of B-to-B warranty but luckily replaced at no cost due to Oil Separator failure and power train coverage. Problem was too much oil getting into the exhaust from a bad separator resulting in a cracked DPK. 2nd DPF was installed for less than a year before the Oil Separator failed and cracked it. Not sure if the same problem killed the first DPF - dealer said it was not, but it took them 2 weeks of calls and data submissions/reviews/tests to the Ford hotline to determine the problem this time. Truck was only showing a P2002 code which most sites posters say to ignore and clear as it means that the DPF is operating at an increased level of efficiency, and the thresholds were not updated after DPF replacement. P2002 can mean its running at increased efficiency - air flow - because the DPF is cracked.

Separator is suppose to last longer with other symptoms before DPF impacts, but it looks like it's a 24k or less maintenance requirement to stay on the safe side. 2018 model eliminated access to replace just the oil filter so you have to replace the entire unit - I've read that some folks replace with the older model to have access to replace just the filter, or add in the catch cans and drippers. I may try one or the other, however, if I did previously it would have voided related elements of my power train warranty for this last go round - DPF is about a $6K/$7K job at the dealer with replacement DPF cost at about $4K.

So be warned that a bad Oil Separator and resulting impacts can be almost as costly as the dreaded CP4 failure. I haven't t seen much around disaster proofing the DPF, other than deleting which is of no interest to me.

I'm pretty happy with Ford as they have kept to their warranty. But 3 DPF's in under 40K miles pretty much tells me I am more than likely to have some serious and (what should be) unnecessary repair costs coming a regular clip. Right now, you can get a good dollar for low mileage super duties making me think long and hard about dumping it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Interesting how a bad oil separator on the intake sidecan result in impact to the DPF. My 17 had the nonservicable CCV, which unsure how it could fail with no media and open chamber design. I still rerouted due to amount of oil residue within cold side pipe and mixture of egr gases in upper intake. That is some bad luck with 3x DPF units under 50k miles.

Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
 

·
Master Tech
Joined
·
505 Posts
With the 2017+ 6.7L the CCV filter issue is a common one however it mostly affects engines with high idle hours. The filter may become clogged causing elevated crankcase pressure and high oil carry over with the crankcase vapors resulting in engine oil use. That engine oil carryover if excessive is considered unmetered fuel and can cause elevated exhaust temperatures especially in the exhaust filter.

The CCV assembly has a serviceable filter which you could change, and I personally recommend doing so long before the published service interval of 100,000 miles or 4000 engine hours. The problems I see related to the CCV filter clogging are mostly on DOT, Municipal and Public Utilities vehicles that in many instances idle for entire shifts 5 days a week or more. Improper maintenance coupled with this use compounds the issue because apparently some large fleet managements do not understand the concept of servicing these vehicles on the basis of operating time and their severe duty operation frequently leading to low engine oil levels, failed turbochargers and catastrophic engine failures. The horrors I have seen! Most personal vehicle owners shouldn't see any issues.

It is difficult to recommend a preventative/early maintenance interval. Pick something that seems reasonable like 5 years, 50,000 miles or 2000 engine hours. Whatever makes you feel warm and fuzzy.

And for those operating vehicles in severe duty conditions and high idling time - you can replace the CCV assembly without the serviceable filter as per TSB 19-2142 (application dependent).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
I know you have no interest in deleting the DPF, but this is the most cost effective route. Unless you live in a state that runs yearly emissions test, then this is the safest route. If you have a warranty, then keep going and let them replace the DPF on their dime. Towing a camper across the country and getting stranded because of the DPF going awry sucks. Been there, got the t shirt to prove it. Three under 50 hurts. Mine died at 66.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
@forddowould you recommend the same interval for 11-16s?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
359 Posts
Not all 17-19 Super Duty pickups have the serviceable CCV filter. As far as I know all the cab n chassis do, and they are the ones more often seeing issues with filter clogging, because they have a filter. My 2019, like the OP and SDER1, has a non-serviceable CCV that does not contain a filter. I'm not sure why the OP kept having reoccurring issues with the non-serviceable CCV, what is there to clog, and why was it happening with such few miles?

DPF and other emissions related parts and systems should be covered under the emissions warranty. GVWR 8500-19500 is 5yr/50k miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,121 Posts
How do I know if mine has the serviceable filter or not?
 

·
Master Tech
Joined
·
505 Posts
ALL '17 and newer 6.7L engines have a filter in the CCV... unless it was replaced with the non-filter cyclonic type. If there are "screws" on the top of the CCV assembly, it has a serviceable filter. That is how you know. You could simply replace the filter... The problematic vehicles listed in the service bulletin "target" the types of chassis regularly used in vocational applications. Regardless, the CCV can malfunction and checking it is part of the diagnostic routine. Two additional notes, the assembly may differ in appearance with model years... and application... AND the bypass valve (which can malfunction) is part of the filter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
359 Posts
ALL '17 and newer 6.7L engines have a filter in the CCV... unless it was replaced with the non-filter cyclonic type. If there are "screws" on the top of the CCV assembly, it has a serviceable filter. That is how you know. You could simply replace the filter... The problematic vehicles listed in the service bulletin "target" the types of chassis regularly used in vocational applications. Regardless, the CCV can malfunction and checking it is part of the diagnostic routine. Two additional notes, the assembly may differ in appearance with model years... and application... AND the bypass valve (which can malfunction) is part of the filter.
Not necessarily true. There are plenty of 17-19 pickups that have(came with) the non serviceable variety. My 2019 is one. Owned since new, never been replaced and is the non serviceable type. Post #2 says his 2017 had the non serviceable type too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
This is what I thought I had on my 17, however there were no access nuts on top or a lid to remove ..and my truck only had 17k miles when I purchased it and CCV unit appeared to be original...


Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
 

·
Master Tech
Joined
·
505 Posts
Could be... I am still trying to find a definitive answer as to whether ALL 2017+ trucks have the serviceable filter and or which do not - this discussion is changing my mind. All of the WSM documentation and the Owner's Manual is ambiguous - showing the assembly as having it but NO mention of the serviceable filter in the description and operation section of the PCED. No delineation whatsoever but it does make sense that the GVW of the vehicle would be the key factor.

Pics of the CCV assembly on the truck would definitely confirm what it has AND if it has been replaced. The factory assembly will have a certification label and a label with the injector IQA numbers on it. Those would be missing if the CCV was replaced. (I have never been able to successfully remove them without destroying them)

One last thing - I do actually have one more resource to get an accurate answer. If I get an accurate and official answer, I will post it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
I meant to add...my CCV assembly did have my injector values label affixed.

Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
 
  • Like
Reactions: FordDoctor

·
Registered
Joined
·
359 Posts
I've seen some say that all 17-19 SRW have the non-serviceable type, with all DRW and cab n chassis having the filtered box. I have not been able to verify that. I have watched several YouTube videos showing CCV reroute installation on the 17-19, including removal of the CCV box, and they all had the sealed box...but there may be something to the GVWR factor, as they were all F-250, like mine.

This one isn't great but does include a quick peek of the inside of the CCV box (2019 F-250). At 7:00 the box is out and easily identified, at 9:40 it's cut open and briefly shows the inside.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top