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Discussion Starter #1
So after doing some research, it appears that most of the time it's the oil cooler.
However, I replaced mine ~20k ago with a factory ford replacement and did a great job flushing coolant. I also put a coolant filter on it too...
At the same time I did a head gasket / stud job.
I got some blackstone lab testing done and they indicated that there is a trace amount of coolant in the oil.
I can confirm the two fluids are joining somewhere.

What is the likelihood the oil is coming from the headgasket? Cracked head? or oil cooler?
How can one test this without tearing it all apart?

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IMO the oil analysis in NO WAY proves there is coolant in the oil. I mean they found no water in the oil sample.

Potassium, and even sodium, can come from other sources.

Have you added any stiction additive to your oil in the last few oil changes?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
IMO the oil analysis in NO WAY proves there is coolant in the oil. I mean they found no water in the oil sample.

Potassium, and even sodium, can come from other sources.

Have you added any stiction additive to your oil in the last few oil changes?
No sticktion additive has been added by me ever in the last 20k miles.
I'm not as worried about the trace amounts of "coolant" they found in the oil.
I am worried about the oil I have found in my degas bottle. It doesn't really smell, it's very slick.
I'm not an expert but to me it really feels like oil and not diesel in the coolant.
Up till I checked it tonight, it's been a real small amount (floating to the side of the degas bottle about 1/8" thick) and it wasn't getting worse (over 1 year period). I was just HOPING the small amount of oil was left over after I did the head gaskets.
This past weekend I took my 9k travel trailer out and I noticed the coolant was abnoramlly high so I took another peak. Instead of it causing only a ring, it now appears to almost cover the coolant.

How would one determine that it is really the oil cooler? I hate to buy another one and go through all the pain of installing it and flushing out my coolant only to find it didn't work. I may actually set the truck afire if this happens. I know some have had great luck with the 6.0 but man, I got the lemon...
 

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Oil in the coolant looks like a chocolate milkshake. What you have makes it sound more like diesel.

Take a look at the cylinder head repair tool for leaking fuel Ford 6.0L Head Fix Made Easy
 

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I understand you are more concerned about what is contaminating the coolant, but just to be 100% clear - IMO you do NOT have sufficient evidence of coolant in the oil. I know what the Blackstone report states, but (again IMO) that "supposition" of coolant in the oil should be ignored unless it goes way up.

Please post a picture (or a link to a picture) of what is in the degas bottle. In fact, a picture looking into the degas bottle would be helpful, and so would a picture of a sample of that "slick" material.

I agree with Chris - it sounds more like fuel in the coolant at this point.

I have seen both the milkshake (oil emulsified with water/coolant into a semi-solid thick goo) that Chris mentioned as well as a thin film of black oil floating on the top of the degas bottle. The thin film of black oil will be seen when the amount of oil contamination is very small and/or when the truck has been sitting and the oil that emulsified in with the water/coolant has had a chance to breakdown back into the oil phase. IMO the milkshake like oil-and-coolant "sludgy" mix is far more common. It is formed from the agitation/mixing from going through the small oil cooler passageways at somewhat high velocities, and from the water pump agitation/mixing.

Diesel is a type of oil. It will be slick to the touch and float on top of the coolant. If the contaminant you see is not black, I would have to suspect it to be diesel. Over time, diesel will soften the degas plastic and cause it to deform. Like oil, it will also cause a lot of the coolant hoses (any rubber it touches) to begin to fail.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
See attached images. The engine in these pictures hasn't ran for approximately 18 hrs.

The sludge layer I saw across the whole top layer has dissipated to what you see below. Also it doesn't have a foul smell like some have said it should.

I know coolant level is a bit too high too.


767855
767856
767857
 

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That looks more like diesel to me. If so, it means a cracked head ....... or in uncommon cases it might be BOTH a cracked injector cup with a bad lower injector o-ring on that very same cylinder (both are required for fuel to get into the coolant from a bad cup, the cup by itself will not do it).



 

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This is for a different engine, but it presents a good pic:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you all. It's my understanding that diesel coming into coolant can be corrected with cups. Is there ever a case where it can't be corrected?
 

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I posted above that it is uncommon for 6.0L cups to crack.

It is also impossible for a cup by itself to cause this problem because of the design of the head and the cup location ON A 6.0L. If a cup cracks or leaks, fuel is prevented from getting to the coolant behind the cup by the lower injector o-ring. BOTH the lower injector o-ring and the cup have to fail. It does not happen often, but it clearly has happened.

Far more common for a cracked head.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So a larger injector cup is unlikely to solve a cracked head? I guess it's hard to say over the internet without investigation but just trying to understand better.
 

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Assuming it is a cracked head, you are correct that one method is to install a longer cup with epoxy that covers the cracked head area. That is the Accurate Diesel repair method. If you go that route, you will have to modify the injector to fit with the aftermarket cup.

BulletProofDiesel makes a repair kit that does not require any injector modifications, but the repair (sleeve the injector bore) has to be done at their shop (the repair discussion starts around 5:00).
 
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