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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Changed the filters on my F-350 today. Both the frame rail one and the engine mounted one. Used Motorcraft OEM filter(s) purchased from O'Reilly's auto-parts store.

When I drained the rail-mounted filter before replacing the fuel looked good & clear. Filter was dirty (see attached pic). Truck has 32,500 on the clock.

Other pictures show the connections to the engine mounted filter. Since that one is a sealed unit, without cutting it up I can't inspect. Anyway, I noticed that the yellow connector has a "T" in it, that I didn't notice when reviewing the "how-to".

Anyway, that may or (more likely not) be related to the issue at hand.

After reconnecting all fuel lines (and triple checking they were all secure and tabs were locked down). Reconnected the WIF connector on the frame-mounted filter.

Primed ignition half-a-dozen times or more (turn key on, wait 30s, turn key off). After 6+ times, cranked engine. Engine cranks but no start.
Primed another 10+ times. Engine cranks, but no start.

Re-checked all fuel and electrical connections.
Dropped frame filter and made sure it was filling with fuel. Added more fuel into the filter "cup" and re-screwed it on.

Primed ignition a few times.
Cranked engine - almost starts. Then dies. This only happened once.

Repeatedly primed pump. Crank engine. No start.
Repeat until batteries almost die.

As it stands now, I have the batteries hooked up to a charger and I am going to leave it over night.

What did I do wrong? I've reviewed my steps and I can't find fault.

I am getting a fault code indicating insufficient fuel pressure, but no check engine light (CEL).
 

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Changed the filters on my F-350 today. Both the frame rail one and the engine mounted one. Used Motorcraft OEM filter(s) purchased from O'Reilly's auto-parts store.

When I drained the rail-mounted filter before replacing the fuel looked good & clear. Filter was dirty (see attached pic). Truck has 32,500 on the clock.

Other pictures show the connections to the engine mounted filter. Since that one is a sealed unit, without cutting it up I can't inspect. Anyway, I noticed that the yellow connector has a "T" in it, that I didn't notice when reviewing the "how-to".

Anyway, that may or (more likely not) be related to the issue at hand.

After reconnecting all fuel lines (and triple checking they were all secure and tabs were locked down). Reconnected the WIF connector on the frame-mounted filter.

Primed ignition half-a-dozen times or more (turn key on, wait 30s, turn key off). After 6+ times, cranked engine. Engine cranks but no start.
Primed another 10+ times. Engine cranks, but no start.

Re-checked all fuel and electrical connections.
Dropped frame filter and made sure it was filling with fuel. Added more fuel into the filter "cup" and re-screwed it on.

Primed ignition a few times.
Cranked engine - almost starts. Then dies. This only happened once.

Repeatedly primed pump. Crank engine. No start.
Repeat until batteries almost die.

As it stands no, I have the batteries hooked up to a charger and I am going to leave it over night.

What did I do wrong? I've reviewed my steps and I can't find fault.

I am getting a fault code indicating insufficient fuel pressure, but no check engine light (CEL).
if the frame filter housing is not all the way tightened the truck will not run. u can crank it over till the cows come home. I did this on my truck when I changed the rail filter.
 

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^^ Exactly what he said. I made the same mistake of not getting my filter housing tight enough. At least you are in your driveway. Mine started and allowed me to drive about 40 miles from home before Low Pressure warning, and I was on the side of the road.

I recommend putting a very light film of grease on the o-ring and threads. Tighten the bowl on there until it physically cannot be turned any more- it can be turned further than you think, hence the grease to reduce friction. If the bowl is not fully tightened, the pump will suck air and the fuel system will not be able to maintain prime.
 

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turn till it hits the stop. Also make sure you lube the new o-ring with diesel and the threads. Last, Make sure you arnt double or tipple o-ringing the thing. seen in happen.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
if the frame filter housing is not all the way tightened the truck will not run. u can crank it over till the cows come home. I did this on my truck when I changed the rail filter.
^^ Exactly what he said. I made the same mistake of not getting my filter housing tight enough.
...
I recommend putting a very light film of grease on the o-ring and threads. Tighten the bowl on there until it physically cannot be turned any more- it can be turned further than you think, hence the grease to reduce friction. If the bowl is not fully tightened, the pump will suck air and the fuel system will not be able to maintain prime.
turn till it hits the stop. Also make sure you lube the new o-ring with diesel and the threads. Last, Make sure you arnt double or tipple o-ringing the thing. seen in happen.
All good advice (I think!). Thanks.

I *did* tighten it until I *thought* it couldn't turn any more, but didn't add grease. I will retry after adding a smear of grease.

I was afraid of breaking it...
 

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the filter maybe leaning when you screwing the housing back on giving a false indication of the housing being all the way tightened. That is what happened to me because I was changing it in my driveway on a incline.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Quick follow up. Everything is back in working order now.

I took the earlier advice and after taking the frame filter housing apart, I applied a little grease to both the O-ring and the threads. Things when waaaaay smoother. This time after the assembly got "snug" I was able to tighten it (using a 32mm socket, btw) almost a complete turn.

Also, there was a noticeable "click" when it was facing the right direction to connect the WIF sensor.
 

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Changed the filters on my F-350 today. Both the frame rail one and the engine mounted one. Used Motorcraft OEM filter(s) purchased from O'Reilly's auto-parts store.

When I drained the rail-mounted filter before replacing the fuel looked good & clear. Filter was dirty (see attached pic). Truck has 32,500 on the clock.

Other pictures show the connections to the engine mounted filter. Since that one is a sealed unit, without cutting it up I can't inspect. Anyway, I noticed that the yellow connector has a "T" in it, that I didn't notice when reviewing the "how-to".

Anyway, that may or (more likely not) be related to the issue at hand.

After reconnecting all fuel lines (and triple checking they were all secure and tabs were locked down). Reconnected the WIF connector on the frame-mounted filter.

Primed ignition half-a-dozen times or more (turn key on, wait 30s, turn key off). After 6+ times, cranked engine. Engine cranks but no start.
Primed another 10+ times. Engine cranks, but no start.

Re-checked all fuel and electrical connections.
Dropped frame filter and made sure it was filling with fuel. Added more fuel into the filter "cup" and re-screwed it on.

Primed ignition a few times.
Cranked engine - almost starts. Then dies. This only happened once.

Repeatedly primed pump. Crank engine. No start.
Repeat until batteries almost die.

As it stands now, I have the batteries hooked up to a charger and I am going to leave it over night.

What did I do wrong? I've reviewed my steps and I can't find fault.

I am getting a fault code indicating insufficient fuel pressure, but no check engine light (CEL).
Hi, happy holidays.

My 2012 Super duty had a "transfer flow" 50 gallon tank installer and asked that the filters be replaced along with the other work. They were having problem getting air in the fuel lines. To make a long story short the frame filter wasn't seating correctly. The filter needs to be seated in a hexagon recess at the bottom of the filter housing and when the housing is screwed back up on the filter head there are plastic fingers in the housing that force the filter (upper open end) on to the clean fuel (center of the filter) outlet tube. One of these "fingers was broken off" during a previous service. So, the filter was being forced onto its outlet connection and didn't seat correctly. A hairline gap was left between the filter can and the filter head --- hence the air entering the fuel system. A little firm persuasion Hitting and tightening got her seated correctly. Need to order a new frame mounted filter can before the next service.

PJ
 

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That was my first thought, frame filter housing not tight. I think it takes 1 1/8" socket, if i remember right. Filter housing maybe feel tight, but when it is tight, it will stop dead. That's the only thing i can think of. And the O ring stayed in place. Good luck.
 

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check you DCFM filter for metal is about the only way to check.
 

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I had no idea these things were so delicate. I only started it, it ran dry and I prime and cranked it maybe 5 or six times before starting. A few times it would run and die. I’ll look at the filter when I can find some info on how to get to it.

Thanks
 

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The DFCM is on the frame. It contains the low pressure fuel pump and the 10 micron fuel filter/water separator.

You can read the 6.7 coffee table books at this link

http://www.forddoctorsdts.com/coffeetablebooks.html

Also, the owner's manual says to prime the system with 6 key turns (not to start, just to on) waiting 30 seconds before switching the key off on each of the key turns. This should fill the cup and prime the fuel system as it is a closed loop fuel system.
 

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The DFCM is on the frame. It contains the low pressure fuel pump and the 10 micron fuel filter/water separator.

You can read the 6.7 coffee table books at this link

http://www.forddoctorsdts.com/coffeetablebooks.html

Also, the owner's manual says to prime the system with 6 key turns (not to start, just to on) waiting 30 seconds before switching the key off on each of the key turns. This should fill the cup and prime the fuel system as it is a closed loop fuel system.
Great thanks,

If I don’t see any shavings, am I likely good? I guess not waiting 30 seconds between key turns is what caused my pump to run dry and the engine die out.
 
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