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Discussion Starter #1
I have an 04 ccsb 4x4 with egr delete 4 inch exhaust with 113k

Just got the trick this year and noticed that with the heat on at idle there is little to no heat coming out but as soon as I give it a little throttle 1.2k I get good heat and at 1.5k I get great heat.

I don't know the condition of the coolant or what it has in it (it looks greenish). I plan on doing a coolant flush this week and mix in a little simple green to get any slug out.

Does anyone know what this is?

I have searched the post and there are many theories, but nothing conclusive.

Thanks in advance for any help!!
 

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when mine did this i came to find out my head gaskets were bad good luck
 

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Whats your Coolant temperature at idle? If your thermostat is stuck open, your coolant temperature will be too low to give you any good kind of heat. Do you have any sort of data monitor, CTS, or Scanguage? If not, that needs to be your first step, stat.

Secondly, if your coolant is green, chances are its the WRONG kind of coolant for this engine. Not 100% guaranteed, but pretty likely. The Stock ford coolant is Gold, and most replacement ELC's that work are Red. I'd get that taken care of ASAP, as the wrong coolant in these engines can be almost a death sentence. I highly recommend following this coolant flush procedure: http://home.comcast.net/~lyon.family1/truck/Powerstroke Cooling System Flush v1-0.pdf , but seriously, first step is monitoring your temperatures. Both for Heat/Thermostat problems, and proper Delta. I would hold off on the flush until you get an accurate temperature delta reading, as I would hate to have you do a basic flush, only to find out that you need to do a more through flush again later if you need to change your oil cooler.

Unloaded at idle, your truck should not drop below 190 degrees coolant temperature. If it does, your thermostat is most likely bad. If your thermostat is bad, then your temperature delta reading is not accurate, and you need to fix the thermostat first before checking your delta. Once you fix the thermostat, if the delta is above 15 degrees while cruising at 65mph unloaded on flat ground after 5-10 minutes, general consensus is your oil cooler is pretty much done for and needs replacing.

Sorry to hit you with all of this, but the 6.0's are temperamental beasts, and require proper maintenance and care to keep running 100%. Most people do not know this, and small problems develop that could easily be prevented, but over time, get much larger and need more work to fix.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I don't have a monitoring device and that is the first priority on my list.

How can this be related to a HG issue if I never lose coolant and don't have any white smoke or coolant in my oil?

I did have some minor puking but I was on the road for over 900 miles straight. Is there another reason it would puke? I will get the cts as soon as I can, but in the mean time is there a conclusive test for HG issues?

Mainly can I still drive it safely without any issues?

It runs great I just averaged 20.6 mpg hand calculated on this roadtrip.
 

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The fact that it's puking coolant, even a little, changes things somewhat.

There's a lot of causes of puking, of which headgaskets are just one.

Another is a clogged oil cooler leading to low coolant flow and flash boiling in the EGR Cooler, which usually happens _before_ the headgaskets go, and is probably more likely in your case. The sequence of failure usually goes as follows:

-A Clogged Oil Cooler leads to a reduction of coolant flow to EGR Cooler (What causes the oil cooler to clog is still open for debate, but it does, and it seems to do it more on factory Ford Gold Coolant than any other. Whether this is because people who change their coolant take better care of their trucks after or not is unknown, needless to say, the coolers clog, its very common)
-EGR Cooler, with reduced coolant flow, flash boils, causing increased pressure in Cooler and degas bottle puking <-- My Best Guess puts you here, based on the small amount of puking you saw. I could be wrong however.
-EGR Cooler eventually pops welds from too much pressure inside, leaking coolant into your intake path
-Coolant in your intake gradually increases in volume, and enters cylinders
-Uncompressable coolant in cylinders causes higher cylinder pressure, leading to headgasket failure, and eventually, engine hydrolocking.

You really need a monitoring device before you can determine about anything else. If you don't have one on order yet, you can get a Scanguage II from BPD for $170 pre-programmed for everything you absolutely _need_:
ScanGauge II Digital Data Monitor

I can't comment on drivability at this time, because I don't know your situation. If you don't HAVE to drive it, I would recommend not doing so until you get a chance to monitor the vitals, but if you need to, then obviously you need to.

If I were in your shoes right now, knowing what I know, I'd order the appropriate chemical flushes and replacement coolant, a coolant filter kit, and a new thermostat right now, along with the Scanguage.

Either way, whether your oil cooler is clogged or not, you're going to want to do a coolant flush and fill, and install the filter kit. Might as well clean it out properly with Restore/Restore+/VC-9 whatever method you choose when you change the thermostat and coolant from whatever junk is in there now. These forums have many stories of people just doing a distilled flush and fill, only to have to re-do it later because it didn't remove anything, really. Do it right, and do it once.

Then, once you flush it out good, if your deltas are high due to a clogged oil cooler, your coolant system is already clean and prepared for a new cooler to be dropped in. If your deltas are good, then you're done. If you end up changing your oil cooler, it's also best to change/upgrade the EGR Cooler, or do a EGR Delete, at the same time, as the old one, if not leaking already, has had the additional stress placed on it from the boiling, and is no longer servicable. Which you do depends on you, and if you want your EGR system still functional for emissions testing.

You do NOT want to do a flush on a new oil cooler later if it ends up that it's clogged, as it is well documented that doing a flush on a new replacement cooler can gunk it right back up. You want to flush before changing the oil cooler, and run the system a bit on the old cooler if possible with the filter kit, to clean out your system as much as possible before installing the new oil cooler.
 

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Oh, and welcome to the 6.0 Family! :icon_ford::doh:
:hehe:

It really is a good engine once you fix all of Ford's mistakes, and catch up on the maintenance that the previous owners neglected to do.
I got my truck, drove it from the Shady Dealer to the shop immediately, and had a $7000 bill right out of the gate!
Granted, I was expecting it, as the Truck was for sale FAR below value price, because the dealer knew it was broken in oh so many ways.

One Coolant Flush and Fill, EGR Delete, Oil Cooler replacement, AC Compressor replacement, All Fluids replacement, Brakes, calipers, Coolant filter, Radiator, serpentine belt, Pittman Arm, Tire set later... I'm good to go! :lol:
(I'm sure there's some other stuff in there that I missed as well...)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I get your point I will do a flush and order the cts (I like all the options)

Now, do I need the bulletproof oil cooler? My egr is already deleted. Once I do the flush and put a filter on it can I just by a stock oil cooler and be safe. I would love to do that since it's $1500 dollars cheaper. What do recommend?
 

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If your EGR is already deleted (sorry, missed that part in the original post!) then I'd say yes, you can run the stock oil cooler. I am still running a stock cooler, and it works just fine, as long as you keep it from gunking up. Without an EGR in the line to fail, your only concern at this point is the oil cooler not cooling your oil enough, or possibly the oil cooler itself rupturing from heat, but that shouldn't happen unless your oil temperatures get REALLY REALLY high. The engine begins to defuel if your oil hits around 250 degrees.

The BPD cooler is great in that you never have to worry about failure, or gunking up of it again, but if you take care of your truck, the stock cooler should work just fine. Right now, just worry about the flush and thermostat, and once that's good, then you can check the deltas.

If your deltas are good after the flush, you don't need to change the cooler. There's a chance that the junk coolant that's in there now is the cause of the puking itself, and it's not clogged up much, if at all.

Good luck! :thumb:

Oh, quick question, HOW is your EGR deleted? There's multiple methods of doing it, and some of the methods are better than others, in regards to preventing problems down the line.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Don't know how it is deleted. I took it to the best diesel shop in town before I bought it and they said that I had one of the better egr deletes. They also told me not to buy the 6.0 and get a 7.3 but I took a chance and so far only had the FICM go and I fixed that myself. Let's hope that puppy holds up:)

Where can I get the restore? Local parts house? Orillies.... Advanced auto parts didn't have it. I just called.

Thanks for all the info, this has really helped!!
 

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Okay, thats fine. Plate cover and a coolant routing tube then. That will cause absolutely no problems in the future. Some deletes just weld the up pipe, or block off the ends of an existing cooler, which could still cause problems if the cooler was leaking internally. But if you have nothing there anymore, you have nothing to worry about. Just keeping your oil below defuel level really is your only concern. Obviously a high delta is still bad, but it's nowhere near as 'fatal' to your engine as it would be if you still had an EGR Cooler. I'd still recommend replacing the oil cooler if needed to keep the delta within the 15 degree 'safe zone' but there's no immediate threat to your engine if it's outside that.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
What do you mean "keep your oil below refuel level"?

Thanks again for all your help, I am trying to learn as much as possible.
 

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defuel, not refuel :)

When your engine oil temperature reaches the 250's, the PCM (engine computer) will actually start cutting fuel and killing power to attempt to lower the temperature itself. It is a safeguard built into our trucks in an attempt to keep them from damaging themselves too much in case of oil system failure.

Personally, I'd be concerned if my Engine Oil Temperature ever broke 240 for more than a few seconds. I hit it the other week hauling a huge load up a steep bridge in 100+ degree weather, but it immediately dropped back down to the 220's-230 area once I crested it.
 
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