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I watched this video. I was surprised to see that no one (Jeep or Ford) was using tire chains. They spent a lot of time slipping and sliding around when (to my way of thinking anyway) some good old fashioned tire chains would have helped a lot.

Any reason for NOT putting chains on the rear of my 2016 F-350 long bed? Four wheel drive is great, but I don't run big-lug tires. After 30 years of truckin' and chaining up on mountain passes, I've seen my share of 'big' pickups in the ditch.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I have no experience that counts for anything when it comes to driving in those kinds of conditions we don't get much snow and when I'm in the mud it is usually for fun and when it's not the only recovery gear I have used are winches, shovels, tubafos, ect. In fact these guys have never used chains in the videos that I have watched. I was really surprised that the heavy diesel didn't get stuck to be honest.
 

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That little camper sure squatted down the back end of that truck a lot. Do the newer f250s have a softer rear suspension? I can haul a 3/4 ton truck on my 20 ft trailer with most of the weight in front of the axles and my F250 with factory leaf springs doesnt squat much at all.
 

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That little camper sure squatted down the back end of that truck a lot. Do the newer f250s have a softer rear suspension?
I think issue with that 'squat' had more to do with his low-slung hitch than soft suspension. He was dragging the front of the trailer because the hitch was too low. I was really surprised to see that. In my opinion, the guy in the Ford was totally unprepared for the job at hand. At the very least he should have had one of those multi-height fancy schmancy aluminum hitches you see in custom truck shops that you can adjust to fit whatever height trailer you plan to tow. Especially in THIS case.

And, as I mentioned above, no one having any chains really surprised me! :surprise:
 

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I think issue with that 'squat' had more to do with his low-slung hitch than soft suspension. He was dragging the front of the trailer because the hitch was too low. I was really surprised to see that. In my opinion, the guy in the Ford was totally unprepared for the job at hand. At the very least he should have had one of those multi-height fancy schmancy aluminum hitches you see in custom truck shops that you can adjust to fit whatever height trailer you plan to tow. Especially in THIS case.

And, as I mentioned above, no one having any chains really surprised me! :surprise:
You can see how much the rear tire is pushed up into the wheel well and it's sitting nose high, a taller hitch would have brought the trailer up more but it wouldn't help with the squat. I also noticed he has a 5th wheel hitch in the back, I wonder how it does when he tows it, any decent size 5th wheel will have double or triple the hitch weight of that travel trailer.
 

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You can see how much the rear tire is pushed up into the wheel well and it's sitting nose high
I went back and re-watched the video. You're right about that. I was so busy looking at that wrong sized hitch that I didn't notice the 'squat'. I don't think I'd call these guys to tow me after watching this.

Although I watched another of their 'recovery' vids and they seem to do alright most of the time.
 

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I went back and re-watched the video. You're right about that. I was so busy looking at that wrong sized hitch that I didn't notice the 'squat'. I don't think I'd call these guys to tow me after watching this.

Although I watched another of their 'recovery' vids and they seem to do alright most of the time.
I am not bashing Winder towing at all, I have watched most of their video's and they have always done a good job. I was just surprised at how soft of a suspension the rear of that f250 is. I recently looked at a 6.7 f250 and it only had 2 leaves in the rear pack not including the bottom short one. My 2000 f250 has the standard leaf springs in the rear and it has 4 leaves. I find it odd that the newer trucks are rated to tow and haul more yet they have a softer suspension. Maybe they expect that anyone who tows a lot will add airbags later.
 

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They got it done, but something a little more aggressive on that Ford other than an AT tire and some chains would have made a huge difference - not to mention the squat too! Geez...

-jokester
 

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It was surprising to see how much that F250 squatted with the camper. Something can't be right with that.
I've never watched any of their videos but I didn't notice a company logo on the F250 so maybe part of why it didn't seem set up for "off road recovery" with an adjustable hitch and more aggressive tires. Wet heavy snow like that packs quickly and slicks over like ice and those standard ATs were not up for the challenge. And in the mountains like they are and not having tire chains seems very weird.

I will definitely have to watch some more of their videos.
 

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Some of yall have never been stuck off road and it shows :rofl:

Plus what is all that crap on the tongue of that trailer? that delivery van had a basket and an extended hitch, how he made it out there in the first place is a miracle.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I am curious how that van got out there. He couldn't have done so in those conditions so he must have been there before the snow fell.
I started watching these videos after visiting the area and realizing that my current set up wasn't up to the potential challenges presented by some of the remote campsites. When it rains some of that sand is so fine that it makes some of the slickest mud I've ever seen. And when dry, it can be easy to spin yourself into a hole with the wrong tires and I didn't trust my factory tires to be up to the task even if I lowered the pressure.
@Heavy_GD you're right. I don't have any experience with my truck off road. To be honest the extra weight makes me nervous:eek:hnoes: and has kept me on the pavement. I am going to upgrade my tires but don't want to go much taller. Not sure what else after that... Selectable locker? Winch?
 

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So, "all that crap" on the tongue is where the trailer's batteries and propane tanks are located, but I have to admit, I've never seen a conglomeration like that before either. Looking at the dirt under the trailer, I think it's pretty obvious he set up camp before it snowed. And as "Heavy" mentioned, with that extension and the basket on rear of the van, I don't see how he could have towed the trailer at all. Something's not right here. I think there's more to this story, but it doesn't really matter.

Should have watched the weather reports before he headed up there.

Back in the 80's I had a 2wd F-250 and managed to get stuck in the playa of the Black Rock Desert (long before Burning Man started going out there). Luckily my buddy was behind me in his aging Chevy Blazer and yanked me out with a "Snatch-em Strap". That was when I learned about "poor man's 4wd", a set of tire chains. I would upload the video of that adventure but it's on a Beta tape. Sigh. I also got stuck in sand along side the road when I pulled off to make a U-Turn. Another guy in a pickup came along and pulled me out. After several of these stupid episodes of getting stuck, I've gotten a lot smarter (I hope . . .) about where I go, where I stop, and how far into the out-back I haul our trailer.

The attached picture was taken in Montana near someplace called Porcupine Creek. I had to back into this spot about a quarter mile. We walked in first to determine if I could pull a U-turn. That would have put too much stress on the trailer's tires and axles so backing in was the only way. Wifey walked behind me with a walkie-talkie and directed me away from low hanging branches. We still broke off a rain gutter thingie but it was worth it for the campsite. Ended up staying there for six days! That's my old, much loved truck. Gone now . . . Sniff sniff.
 

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Exactly @MrTommy I bet it had water tanks up front too.
I have a pic somewhere of a billet hitch bent where a kinetic strap was turned loose on it.
Snatching is old school, but gets things done.

@Work Truck Fanatic the tires make a huge difference, someone like MrTommy understands for sure.
After that a locker is a great investment.
From there self recovery is a slippery slope, I have a ton of gear that I carry hoping I never have to use it.
Check out Factor55 on line, those guys make great products.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The attached picture was taken in Montana near someplace called Porcupine Creek. I had to back into this spot about a quarter mile. We walked in first to determine if I could pull a U-turn. That would have put too much stress on the trailer's tires and axles so backing in was the only way. Wifey walked behind me with a walkie-talkie and directed me away from low hanging branches. We still broke off a rain gutter thingie but it was worth it for the campsite. Ended up staying there for six days! That's my old, much loved truck. Gone now . . . Sniff sniff.
That's a cool story.
 

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I am curious how that van got out there. He couldn't have done so in those conditions so he must have been there before the snow fell.
I started watching these videos after visiting the area and realizing that my current set up wasn't up to the potential challenges presented by some of the remote campsites. When it rains some of that sand is so fine that it makes some of the slickest mud I've ever seen. And when dry, it can be easy to spin yourself into a hole with the wrong tires and I didn't trust my factory tires to be up to the task even if I lowered the pressure.
@Heavy_GD you're right. I don't have any experience with my truck off road. To be honest the extra weight makes me nervous:eek:hnoes: and has kept me on the pavement. I am going to upgrade my tires but don't want to go much taller. Not sure what else after that... Selectable locker? Winch?


Tires are a great upgrade but you need to be sure. Generally speaking these are principles that have done me well:

MT tires: great off road traction and OK road manners and meh in snow/ice/ shorter treadlife
AT tires great road and OK off road manners and better in snow/ice/ longer treadlife
I haven't run a highway tires in 10+yrs.

If you need a winch to pull yourself out and you aren't planning on offroading you shouldn't be there plain and simple. A rear locker alone makes the truck a totally different animal. Depending on the differential set up 90% of trucks are only a 1wheel drive when in 2wd and a 2wd when in 4 wheel drive. One tire up front and one in rear. adding a locker will even make a 2wd truck go places you'd be amazed at.

Airing down tires a bit (harder with heavier trucks combined with trailers) will be another big improver esp if you have something like a viaair compressor figure about 30 minutes to air all 4 back up though with breaks. I wanted a winch on my current f250 but realized it was more of a want. I have an 84 4runner with a winch, gears, mt tires, manual transmission, that will go darn near anywhere when I really want to get away.

For a heavy diesel and trailer MT tires like Toyo, Nitto, and BFG with a locker will be about as practical/cost effective as your going to get without throwing big money on a bumper, proper bracing, winch, snatch block, some recovery straps and maybe one those fancy kinetic energy ropes (very dangerous if you don't use them correctly but man do they yank things out).

I used to play in an 81 Toyota pickup with some 31x15x15 ditch witch directional tractor tires and we just coiled up kinetic energy rope on the hood and in the truck bed for when you needed it.
 

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We nicknamed my brothers 250 the super droopy. It squats bad with a cap and 100 gallons of diesel in the bed. Hook a small enclosed trailer up and I swear it's going to drag the hitch.

Not much payload capacity.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #20
When I bought the truck I had no intentions of going anywhere that required much off roading. I have only ever used ATVs in off road situations and with those getting out was easy. If not on a ATV I just hiked to where I wanted to go when in the woods. But going into Arizona and Utah made me realize on how many of the good spots my family and I missed out on, especially the BLM sites. So thanks for the advice.
If my kid aces his ACTs this weekend and can get a free ride to the undergrad money pit of his choice I can divert his college fund to a Can-Am Maverick X3 Turbo and figure out how to fit it in my 6.5 ft bed so I can haul the TT!
 
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