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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Gentlemen,
I would like to build a device to test second/late generation HPOPs.
To see how they work I have started to disassemble a pump.











Can anyone tell me how these inserts are fixed in the housing? I can't hammer them in, nor can I pull them out with an impact hammer.




 

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06 6.0 drw 635 rwhp (retired) 08 KR build in progress
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Are the holes in the last picture threaded? If so a socket or spacer larger than the od and bolt through middle as a puller should suffice
 

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I sure can't help. but am interested for sure!

Maybe @Hydro ?
Yes, definitely interested
I have been looking for a pump for a while to disassemble -- thank you @Hartwig for doing this
A little while back we had a poster that had one of these plugs pop out -- will do a search and see if I can find the post -- he had pictures

Those plugs look like the shaft drill port plugs used in some of the transmissions that I work with -- Basically just a large pop rivet
the center part is tapered with small annular grooves that act like a zip tie locking device -- also tapered to cause the outer ring part to swell in the bore

I do not have a picture of one of these port plugs to add to the knowledge -- but somewhere in my toolbox I have an unused plug, ...lost in the mess (will look tho)

I am thinking drive down on the center part to release the outer ring -- you would have to overcome the "lock rings" on the taper part of the plug
This thought is theoretical since I do not have first hand knowledge of this particular plug in your pictures

A "junk" pump would be good so it could cut apart at the plug, and dissected to see if the plug acts as I think
a "cut-a-way" pump would be good as a demonstration tool , but useless for testing -- maybe one day we can have both
 
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Not the actual plug I was referring to, but this type may also be the one you have

 
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This one is very similar

 

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Maybe Corey from C&C Fab (@[email protected]) is knowledgeable on this. He is a bit of a genius.


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Pretty sure they are a version of expanding plug like the links I posted -- basically wedges in the hole and the pull shank snaps off when it gets tight
But def cutting one in half at the plug would show how it works -- really need a total junk pump for that part
A band saw may work fine or clamp the pump in the ole Bridgeport and let the carbide chew the side off
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The HPOP is in fact very simple in design. The 4 valves are "force-operated" (I'm sure my translator will fail me again on this word :) ) similar to the valves in the cylinder head of any workshop compressor with a piston unit.
Of course, these valve inserts are hardened, which has cost some teeth of my saw band.
The valve inserts themselves are only pressed in high strength, I could not discover any form-fitting connection. You can hit the valve inserts with a large hammer and raw force inside and remove them.





















Next week I will change the saw band and split the housing.
 

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Hartwig if you keep having to cut things apart your going to need to build a water-jet machine.

As for a test bed I was thinking that you could use the bolt points then make a mounting pad
for the bump to bolt to. Then a hydraulic hose from some sort of oil reservoir and then a pressure
gauge with an over pressure relief valve. Then you just need to make an adaptor to drive the pump.
I would bet that your not going to need a large motor to drive the pump with the correct ratio of gearing.
I think some sort of filtering in the reservoir might be a good idea. And for controling the IPR you could
use a 12 volt PWM driver like the test tool that OTC makes. >> Ford 6.0L Diesel IPR Controller | Diesel Ford | OTC Tools
For overkill you could have a variable control for the IPR and a trace recorder for the pressure output.
 

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Hartwig if you keep having to cut things apart your going to need to build a water-jet machine.

... And for controling the IPR you could
use a 12 volt PWM driver like the test tool that OTC makes. >> Ford 6.0L Diesel IPR Controller | Diesel Ford | OTC Tools
For overkill you could have a variable control for the IPR and a trace recorder for the pressure output.
Good to see you over here on the .org ;)

Take a look near the end of this thread, @TooManyToys was kind enough to pop the cover on that control box and take a some good pictures of the insides -- The 6764 is nothing more than a simple 5.0 volt power supply, using a voltage regulator -- no pulse width involved

I was disappointed that there was not more "fancy" electronics inside to mimic the PCM control -- at least a 555 timer circuit would mimic the pulse width
 

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I pop in every now and then.
I see where a voltage regulator would be less parts than a PWM device.
You get close to the same results with both. For what they are charging for it
The PWM makes nore sense. But it looks like the account department got involved.

I did not see the Post from Jack. Do you have a direct link?
 

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A six volt battery would do just fine if you have the connector.

Product Liquid Font Fluid Material property
 

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I pop in every now and then.
I see where a voltage regulator would be less parts than a PWM device.
You get close to the same results with both. For what they are charging for it
The PWM makes nore sense. But it looks like the account department got involved.

I did not see the Post from Jack. Do you have a direct link?
Yes, sorry thought I put the link in -- Yeah pop in myself at times over on FTE

 

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A six volt battery would do just fine if you have the connector.
Regular 9 volt "transistor radio" battery works well and is easy to find -- for the new generation kids, that is a smoke alarm battery
 
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