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If you are changing the fan clutch get the OEM one, I got mine from Riffraff Diesel. The tip I will give you for getting the fan clutch off is spray it with some PB blaster and let it soak in, I use a chain wrench with a piece of old belt wrapped around the water pump pulley, then a large pipe wrench with a pipe over the handle for more leverage, comes right off.
 

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Air chisel is the easiest way to get the fan clutch off.
 

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Discussion Starter #23

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Discussion Starter #24
I'm a DIY guy 100%....but I'm thinking I will pay a shop to do this one for me. Still need to watch a couple videos, but I'm not sure it's worth the effort on a truck with tons of salt and miles. Probably really stuck on there...
 

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Really u took off the s&b because u wouldn't add a turbo wheel to cure the surge to have a better running truck that would run cooler . Makes no since there on that one .
 

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Here's a few thoughts:
*]The piston tops are oil cooled by squirters. Under heavy load lots of heat is directly rejected to the oil from the pistons.
*The tune (specifically SOI) can influence combustion temperatures, which increases heat rejection to the oil.
*The oil cooler transfers heat in the oil to the coolant.
*The fan clutch will only come on when coolant temp reaches the engagement point. *There has to be heat in the airflow to engage the clutch. A restricted radiator, or airflow through it can affect fan-clutch operation.
*If coolant temp is not out of range, or is not climbing above where it has historically run under similar conditions, the fan clutch is probably still ok.
*If coolant temp rises, but the clutch does not engage, it could be a radiator that is not transferring heat to the airflow.

If your coolant temp is stable and doesn't rise, I doubt it is the radiator or fan clutch. If the oil temp is slow to come down after the load is off, I would clean (muriatic acid soak) the oil cooler bundle. It doesn't take much scale build up on the cooler to reduce its Delta-T from the oil to the coolant.

A WAG from my experience with the cars and big marine engines I work with that have oil to coolant oil-coolers, and instrumentation for monitoring both temps, is that under normal conditions the oil temp runs about 25-40 deg F higher than coolant temp, depending on percentage of load.

And my final thought: 240F oil under load is not really "hot". If you regularly see 260F+, yeah, I'd try to get it down. But 240F for intermittent high load conditions is nothing to worry about when using suitable oil. If you want to know whether you really need to worry about the temps is run a few trips, watch the temps, and run a Blackstone. The viscosity numbers vs time/mileage in service on the oil will tell you what you need to know. If the viscosity numbers are too close to being out of spec, reduce your change interval. Easier and cheaper than messing with other things that probably aren't broken.

I don't think you have a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Here's a few thoughts:
*]The piston tops are oil cooled by squirters. Under heavy load lots of heat is directly rejected to the oil from the pistons.
*The tune (specifically SOI) can influence combustion temperatures, which increases heat rejection to the oil.
*The oil cooler transfers heat in the oil to the coolant.
*The fan clutch will only come on when coolant temp reaches the engagement point. *There has to be heat in the airflow to engage the clutch. A restricted radiator, or airflow through it can affect fan-clutch operation.
*If coolant temp is not out of range, or is not climbing above where it has historically run under similar conditions, the fan clutch is probably still ok.
*If coolant temp rises, but the clutch does not engage, it could be a radiator that is not transferring heat to the airflow.

If your coolant temp is stable and doesn't rise, I doubt it is the radiator or fan clutch. If the oil temp is slow to come down after the load is off, I would clean (muriatic acid soak) the oil cooler bundle. It doesn't take much scale build up on the cooler to reduce its Delta-T from the oil to the coolant.

A WAG from my experience with the cars and big marine engines I work with that have oil to coolant oil-coolers, and instrumentation for monitoring both temps, is that under normal conditions the oil temp runs about 25-40 deg F higher than coolant temp, depending on percentage of load.

And my final thought: 240F oil under load is not really "hot". If you regularly see 260F+, yeah, I'd try to get it down. But 240F for intermittent high load conditions is nothing to worry about when using suitable oil. If you want to know whether you really need to worry about the temps is run a few trips, watch the temps, and run a Blackstone. The viscosity numbers vs time/mileage in service on the oil will tell you what you need to know. If the viscosity numbers are too close to being out of spec, reduce your change interval. Easier and cheaper than messing with other things that probably aren't broken.

I don't think you have a problem.
Thank you Dave. A lot of good info. We are gearing up for the longest road trip ever. (~2000 miles)

I will take your advice. I also may change the oil before the trip rather than the fan clutch. It just has sporadic behavior as to when it decides to run and I thought at 240 I was going to be doing damage. Either way I am gong to spend this week doing a bunch of maintenance and hopefully a good short pull to see how it's running before we set off.

Still love my 7.3. How many vehicles would you take on a 2000 mile road trip with over 200k on the odometer. :) Have my eye on a 6.7 someday, but the 7.3 has been too good to me to say goodbye just yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Really u took off the s&b because u wouldn't add a turbo wheel to cure the surge to have a better running truck that would run cooler . Makes no since there on that one .
Yup - was fairly annoying to listen to as well. The older I get the less cool I get I suppose. :) Works a ton better with stock air box in my situation. Can't say how it would have ran with an aftermarket turbo wheel.
 

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How many vehicles would you take on a 2000 mile road trip with over 200k on the odometer
If I've owned it long enough to have sorted it out, addressed any previous owner-caused deficiencies, and built confidence in its reliability, I'll take any any vehicle I own on any trip regardless of mileage. My 99 now at 210k has been coast to coast 4 times towing my enclosed trailer with the car in it, the longest trip was a 3-1/2 week deal of 8,200 miles that hit Reno 3 times, Long Island, Seattle, and back to Los Angeles. I only opened the hood to check the oil every other day. Zero anxiety. It just goes. The way it should be.

Blackstone Labs now includes pre-paid postage, and the mailer bottle is pre-labeled so it is now super-easy to mail in a sample. The kits are free, order online at Free Test Kits | Blackstone Laboratories I've been running UOA (universal oil analysis) since I bought my truck in 2013. It gives me peace of mind that nothing unseen is occurring that could result in a breakdown on the other side of the country.

Have fun on your trip.
 

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I just want to re-iterate the fan situation too. When the oil temp is 240 and with a properly working thermostat/radiator the fan would still be on. My 1999 has the original radiator, water pump and just a 2yr old motorcraft thermostat, new hoses and coolant and when oil temp hits 210ish it may come on a bit higher (can't remember 100% sorry) the fan kicks on and stays on till it drops. Sometimes sooner, sometimes later depending on what im towing/hills/ambient air, traffic etc.

It just sounds like your fan is not coming on reliably as you mentioned before it seems to be sort of random. I would at least test it. I swore there were some videos on it before. Also like Davep's ghost I would not hesitate to take my 21yr old truck to Alaska or South America tonight. Take care of the truck as best as you can and drive it. These are unusually tough and reliable trucks for what most put them through before issues come up.
 

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Reading these responses, many of which are really unrelated to the towing issue. If I am correct, it is not a cooling system issue (you are not overheating) or a transmission issue. Only oil and it does cool down to above 200. I do alot of towing in the mountains. I tow anywhere from 5,000 - 15,000 pounds with my 2005 6.0 engine up and down the hilly mountains.

Here is (was) my towing issue:
Engine running ~190; engine oil: 195-200. Hit a grade. Temperature starts climing. When water temperature hits ~207, fan starts to engage. By the time the fan gets going, water is up to 215-220 and oil up to 220-230. Things begin to cool down a bit or hold and we head down hill. Engine temp cools down below 207 and fan stops but oil is still cooling and is at about 215-220. Another hill and grade. Oil now climbing 225-230 while engine is just hitting >210. and so on and so on. Oil cannot cool fast enough before a new grade is pushing heat again. My oil temps would commonly reach 230-240 because it never had time to cool before hitting a new grade.

My solution:
I installed a switch on the cooling fan that will ground and start it when I wanted. That way I could keep the fan on even after the the water temp has cooled. I can also see a grade, know it will get hot, and turn the fan on before the sensors do and keep everything in the 200-210 region regardless of the grade or hills. Works well for me.
 

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have u removed the lip on the underside of the air deflector 3c3z-8326-aa? the lip rests on the top of the condenser thereby blocking airflow to the top part of the radiator.

Liland Global | Automotive Aftermarket Leaders has all aluminum radiators. many on ebay they don't always list that name usually about $220. rockauto has them also.
 

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I'll jump in with a few comments since I have had overheating issues and dealt with them without spending a lot of money.
1) If you never hear the viscous drive fan engage then it is probably not working correctly. It sounds like a jet plane and consumes something on the order of 25HP. The new Motorcraft ones are the only way to go.
2) I had a radiator fail and I found a replacement on Amazon for a fair price. It was an OSC 2171 and has been in for a couple of years without a problem.
3) Even with the new radiator and new viscous drive fan I would watch the tranny fluid temp climb while towing on a log incline. I bought one of the aftermarket 6.0 tranny coolers on Ebay (they claimed it was a Dorman) and it 100% solved the problem. The tranny temp no longer rises faster than the water temperature.
 

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Getting the truck ready for towing season.

My only issue with my truck over the last few years is oil temp.

My edge insite will read 230-240 on a hard climb. (Then will drop back down to 200)

Any suggestions? Radiator is stock with over 220k miles. No leaks, but the fins have seen better days. Recently put in new water pump and coolant flush.

I just ordered parts for a transmission service, and fuel filter. Transmission temp has never been an issue at all. Only oil.
Getting the truck ready for towing season.

My only issue with my truck over the last few years is oil temp.

My edge insite will read 230-240 on a hard climb. (Then will drop back down to 200)

Any suggestions? Radiator is stock with over 220k miles. No leaks, but the fins have seen better days. Recently put in new water pump and coolant flush.

I just ordered parts for a transmission service, and fuel filter. Transmission temp has never been an issue at all. Only oil.
I hope you are:

1) running synthetic oil. If not highly recommended. 15W/40 with diesel certification. This will protect your engine from high temp oil breakdown and thinning.
2) adding the required antifreeze booster at suggested intervals.

I realize you said you did a drain and flush adding new antifreeze. Recommended mix 50/50 or pre-mix. Don’t need special stuff just OEM. However, you might try some AMSOIL Coolant Boost. Dropped my running temps after adding and fulfills the every two year/mileage booster requirements.

I would get the fan issue resolved before looking around for other esoteric reasons. Do the above and let me know.

AKWilly
 

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have u removed the lip on the underside of the air deflector 3c3z-8326-aa? the lip rests on the top of the condenser thereby blocking airflow to the top part of the radiator.

Liland Global | Automotive Aftermarket Leaders has all aluminum radiators. many on ebay they don't always list that name usually about $220. rockauto has them also.
Not to hijack, but does anyone have experience with radiators from the link provided? I’m looking for an all aluminum radiator, but can’t fathom paying $700+ for a Mishimoto one

I found the radiator on their site for the 7.3, but don’t see a price listed, maybe because I’m viewing it on a phone


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Not to hijack, but does anyone have experience with radiators from the link provided? I’m looking for an all aluminum radiator, but can’t fathom paying $700+ for a Mishimoto one

I found the radiator on their site for the 7.3, but don’t see a price listed, maybe because I’m viewing it on a phone


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Liland is a major manufacturer. just search for aluminum rad and u can find them for +/- $200. this one has a five yr warranty.
 
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