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Discussion Starter #1
Seems like it would be an easy to install product, would guarantee that no ERG gases are getting routed through the intake.
[url=http://iprresearch.com/product.php?productid=39]IPR EGR Valve Bypass Test Plug Ford 6.0 Powerstroke F250 said:
IPR EGR valve bypass plug allows the EGR valve to be bypassed. This bypass plug allows the use of IPR's Extreme Duty EGR cooler or the OEM EGR Cooler in your 6.0 and blocking or bypassing the exhaust gas from entering the intake manifold which performs like a EGR delete while keeping all emission devices intact such as a EGR cooler. This is a solution for the weekend racer or sled puller to take advantage of a EGR delete while still ensuring that their vehicle is smog compliant.

The EGR valve can be easily swapped in and out by removing the 2 mounting bolts.

IPR EGR bypass plug is also a great diagnostic tool to test if your EGR valve may be defective by simply installing this bypass plug.

 

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I use one made buy a guy that has sold them on eBay for years. $75 if I recall. I drilled and tapped mine for my boost gauge sender.


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seems like a good idea but id be worried about the trapped gases in the egr cooler. seems to me that it would make the coolant pretty darn hot while its going through the egr cooler. i only say this cause usually the exhaust gases are moving through the cooler and heat transfer is pretty quick, but if its not moving id imagine it would heat soak...
someone PLEASE correct me if i am wrong!
 

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seems like a good idea but id be worried about the trapped gases in the egr cooler. seems to me that it would make the coolant pretty darn hot while its going through the egr cooler. i only say this cause usually the exhaust gases are moving through the cooler and heat transfer is pretty quick, but if its not moving id imagine it would heat soak...

someone PLEASE correct me if i am wrong!

With the plug, your dead heading the exhaust gas flow. Take a straw, hold your finger over one end, now try blowing thru the straw.


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With the plug, your dead heading the exhaust gas flow. Take a straw, hold your finger over one end, now try blowing thru the straw.


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Well I understand that, but wouldn't it heat up the coolant even more since it's moving and exhaust flow is just dead headed? Coolant is still passing through the cooler...
 

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Well I understand that, but wouldn't it heat up the coolant even more since it's moving and exhaust flow is just dead headed? Coolant is still passing through the cooler...
I'm no expert, but I'd guess it'd actually heat the water up less. Like you said, the water is moving, the exhaust isn't. Meaning it's not bringing "new" heat in at a constant rate. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.
 

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I'm no expert, but I'd guess it'd actually heat the water up less. Like you said, the water is moving, the exhaust isn't. Meaning it's not bringing "new" heat in at a constant rate. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.
Interesting...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
think of it like a 3 sided building and a cold windy day. Walk inside and instantly there is less wind (and windchill). Now open a door on one of the closed walls and it instantly becomes colder.

Basically the exhaust air in the EGR is trapped and stagnant, it will get hot via induction (being connected to the hot up pipe) but the hot air will no longer travel through the EGR.
 

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Question as I read this thread.

The EGR cooler still has coolant flowing through it...well as long as it is not clogged. Correct. So you still have the coolant pulling heat out of the EGR cooler...but it is dead ended?

Two...it cant have more heat coming into it dead ended as the hot gasses passing through do not in and of themselves cool anything..they are supplying the heat. I understand it is a dead end and so if no external cooling jacket was there then you would have a serious issue with dead end heat build up...but again the coolant still passes through....right?

Also the comparison above is comparing cold air moving into a dead ended room with no external cooling. Rather the comparison would be hot air passing into a room with an external cooling jacket and so...does it do a better job keeping the exiting hot air cool as it exits...or does it overheat the room as once it is a dead end. There is two different applications in this comparison since the primary purpose of the coolant jacket is to cool the gasses as they exit correct...but they have been blocked. So...the coolant is now only really cooling the physical cooler itself...basically...am I correct?

It is like trying to take a hair dryer and blowing hot air into a soda bottle. Once the internal pressure of the bottle builds to a specific point the incoming air does not make it to the dead end it actually enters just a tad and is blown back out by the back pressure. Better yet..take an empty soda bottle and take a drag of a cigarette ( or a blunt if you like) and try and blow smoke in the bottle and see what happens..verses if you cut a hole at the other equal the size of the bottle mouth.

I am not trying to argue...rather just trying to get an accurate idea of what is going on with the EGR cooler dead ended.

So the only possible gain is by preventing hot gasses from EXITING the EGR cooler and going to...what...I forgot...thought it was the Turbo but I have not torn into mine and my 7.3 did not have the [email protected] attached.

The cooler still has to pull inductive heat from the cooler so there would be no gain from a coolant side...but probably not an issue to begin with.

I would have thought that if a $75.00 plug would do the same as a complete delete then most people would have gone that route?

I suppose the answer is from someone who runs a plug and what have they seen.
 

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I don't think inductive heating would be a big problem, but again, I'm no expert. The EGR gasses go directly into the intake manifold, not the turbo.

Also remember that even with the OEM valve in place, it's not open all the time a flowing freely. The valve opens and closes with temp, load, etc. So at times there are trapped gasses in the cooler. Granted, it may not be continuous, but it happens. The other plus of using the plug is that if the cooler does rupture, no coolant goes into the intake. Only thru the hot side of the turbo and out the exhaust.

I would love to see some responses from people who have used them and it'd be great if someone with one of those "point & shoot" thermometers could test the temps of the EGR cooler with both the plug and then with the valve in place, on a identical drive cycle.

I've never used one and I'm not endorsing the plug. They are just as illegal for full time on-road use as a delete is, but I can see where they would be useful for weekend play and troubleshooting use.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
They are just as illegal however for those that don't want EGR gasses entering the intake, but are required to have EGR installed for yearly emissions testing. This would also allow you to leave your EGR valve plugged in, but not installed. You may still get an DTC that you have low EGR flow.
Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words

The EGR plug will effectively block the "Exhaust out returning to Intake Manifold" And the EGR housing itself will continue to be cooled by antifreeze, while acting like a plumbing 'Hammer Arrester' (sort of)

I also would love to hear from more people who have used these, I personally would not concern myself with the amount of air in he EGR, nor the inductive heating. As was stated. Once the passage for exhaust gasses flowing into the intake manifold is blocked, even if the EGR ruptured; coolant could not pass into the intake manifold. I am thinking about making one at work just to try it out.
 

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They are just as illegal however for those that don't want EGR gasses entering the intake, but are required to have EGR installed for yearly emissions testing. This would also allow you to leave your EGR valve plugged in, but not installed. You may still get an DTC that you have low EGR flow.

Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words



The EGR plug will effectively block the "Exhaust out returning to Intake Manifold" And the EGR housing itself will continue to be cooled by antifreeze, while acting like a plumbing 'Hammer Arrester' (sort of)



I also would love to hear from more people who have used these, I personally would not concern myself with the amount of air in he EGR, nor the inductive heating. As was stated. Once the passage for exhaust gasses flowing into the intake manifold is blocked, even if the EGR ruptured; coolant could not pass into the intake manifold. I am thinking about making one at work just to try it out.

BINGO!! Stops exhaust gases from entering intake, and will stop coolant from a failed EGR cooler from entering the intake and causing stretched head bolts or hydro locking the motor.

I made two plugs several years ago, one for myself and another member. I ran this plug for 3yrs without issue.






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shughey00 said:
The EGR cooler still has coolant flowing through it...well as long as it is not clogged. Correct. So you still have the coolant pulling heat out of the EGR cooler...but it is dead ended?
Yes. The exhaust would not be able to enter the EGR cooler, so the EGR cooler would never see hot gasses passing through it.

shughey00 said:
Two...it cant have more heat coming into it dead ended as the hot gasses passing through do not in and of themselves cool anything..they are supplying the heat. I understand it is a dead end and so if no external cooling jacket was there then you would have a serious issue with dead end heat build up...but again the coolant still passes through....right?
The coolant would still flow through the EGR cooler. If the coolant can remove enough heat to cool the EGR cooler with exhaust gasses running through it, the egr cooler can handle NOT having hit exhaust gasses running through it.

shughey00 said:
So...the coolant is now only really cooling the physical cooler itself...basically...am I correct?
Basically, the EGR cooler then becomes a channel through which the coolant passes to return to the rest of the cooling system.


shughey00 said:
So the only possible gain is by preventing hot gasses from EXITING the EGR cooler and going to...what...I forgot...thought it was the Turbo but I have not torn into mine and my 7.3 did not have the [email protected] attached.
Installing the plug would only prevent the passage of hot, sooty, exhaust gases into your intake manifold and into your engine. By doing so, it would (as long as it was installed) prevent the accumulation of soot within the intake manifold.

shughey00 said:
I would have thought that if a $75.00 plug would do the same as a complete delete then most people would have gone that route?
Because, while it stops a failure from causing more damage in one direction, it does not stop that same failure from causing damage going the other way... Read on...


G8orFord said:
The other plus of using the plug is that if the cooler does rupture, no coolant goes into the intake. Only thru the hot side of the turbo and out the exhaust.
So, what happens when this same engine is shut off? The pressure in the cooling system is still there, and the leak is still leaking...

even if the EGR ruptured; coolant could not pass into the intake manifold.
Correct, however that plug would not stop a failed/leaking EGR cooler from hydrolocking the engine either.
The coolant would leak into the exhaust, down the up-pipe on the passenger side of the engine, into the exhaust manifold, and into whatever cylinder happens to have its exhaust valve open when the engine was shut down.
 

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Correct, however that plug would not stop a failed/leaking EGR cooler from hydrolocking the engine either.

The coolant would leak into the exhaust, down the up-pipe on the passenger side of the engine, into the exhaust manifold, and into whatever cylinder happens to have its exhaust valve open when the engine was shut down.

Yes, but if you put in a "blocker plate" in between the EGR cooler to up-pipe, you will prevent coolant from entering the up-pipe and heads. Or replace factory up-pipe with aftermarket "sneaky pipe" that does not connect to the EGR cooler.





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I recognize that this plug is not a delete, and all it's doing is preventing exhaust gases from entering the intake manifold. My only concern would be if the coolant passing through the egr cooler would get too hot. They scan for low flow egr issues here in Ca so I can't block the egr cooler entirely.
 

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My only concern would be if the coolant passing through the egr cooler would get too hot.
Most likely no, it wouldn't. A healthy EGR cooler would probably last a long time, but I was pointing out that crap can still happen.

Might I suggest that you find the egr up-pipe part number for the late 2004 pipe. It will not have the exhaust scoop in it and will fit the 2005-2007 trucks. I'll look around for that part number and see if I can find it.
 

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...
The other plus of using the plug is that if the cooler does rupture, no coolant goes into the intake. Only thru the hot side of the turbo and out the exhaust.
...
...
So, what happens when this same engine is shut off? The pressure in the cooling system is still there, and the leak is still leaking...
...
...Once the passage for exhaust gasses flowing into the intake manifold is blocked, even if the EGR ruptured; coolant could not pass into the intake manifold.
...
Correct, however that plug would not stop a failed/leaking EGR cooler from hydrolocking the engine either.
The coolant would leak into the exhaust, down the up-pipe on the passenger side of the engine, into the exhaust manifold, and into whatever cylinder happens to have its exhaust valve open when the engine was shut down.
I didn't realize this was even a possibility. I'm still new to these trucks and learning. I would not have thought there was a path back to the exhaust manifold from the up pipe. I would have thought the water would just collect in the exhaust pipes, cats and mufflers. Still not good, but not as bad as a hydrolock.
 
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