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This kit looks awesome. The advantage of having a external oil cooler (ie not in the engine valley) while having the efficiency of the stock oil cooler.

This looks like exactly what I'm going to get!
 

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Parts and numbers

Sorry for the delay Nate. Finally back with info.

Original cooler:
1840220c2
307303
USA
322323

New Cooler:
1846635c3
313414

FIIK what it means.

I have the IPR remote mount oil cooler.
It had the supplied in-line coolant filter.
I replaced the supplied in line filter with the high flow coolant filter and observed the following.

I was running 212- 214 oil temps with ECT of 190-192 at 65mph and installed the high flow coolant filter from IPR. The oil temp went to 208 at 65mph with ECT of 190-192. Radiator delta (top to bottom) was 30 degrees F. The delta taken by IR at the IPR filter housing oil hose fittings was 20 degrees.

My take is with higher flow the oil temperature dropped SOOOooooo the oil cooler is not at it's capacity for heat relief. This tells me that more flow or cooler coolant temps are required especially at laminar flow conditions. Turbulent coolant flow may actually occur at the oil cooler which should bring max efficiency ( surface contact/time) but engineering drawings are needed to verify flow characteristics.

I may have a crappy water pump, a half arse flushing (blobs of coagulated coolant) and some other variants. Gonna work with Vince on this one. He has the proof in the pudding.

I'll post when i have the new oil temp sensor installed at the oil cooler outlet.

Any hints and suggestions welcome.
 

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I just wondering how would the coolant filtration unit from IPR work with the oil cooler from Bullet Proof. I want to get a better oil cooler then stock and after watching my oil temp reach 241 pulling a steep grade with a 15,000 lb fifth wheel and water temps reaching 235. still only traveling at 40 mph I know I need to cool this down. Has any one considered this type of set up
 

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A quick note to add to the last one the coolant and oil was fresh with only 300 miles on them prior the trip. both done by the ford dealer and after getting to the top of the hil they droped back down to an average of 218 eot and 210 ect
 

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I just wondering how would the coolant filtration unit from IPR work with the oil cooler from Bullet Proof. I want to get a better oil cooler then stock and after watching my oil temp reach 241 pulling a steep grade with a 15,000 lb fifth wheel and water temps reaching 235. still only traveling at 40 mph I know I need to cool this down. Has any one considered this type of set up
Those deltas look really good, 6* while pulling up a steep grade, you can't ask for better deltas towing. You will not gain anything in terms of deltas running both the bpd oil cooler and IPR coolant filter. The bpd kit is a air cooled oil cooler, no coolant involved. I'm not saying that there will no benefit of running both, because a clean coolant system will work more efficiently than a dirty one.

Personally I think the stock oil cooler is very efficient but it has a fatal flaw, the passages are to small, therefore clogging. The bpd oil cooler is not as efficient you will see much higher deltas while towing, but they are redesigning the exchanger to aid this.

I ordered the IPR external oil cooler and the high flow coolant filter, so I should have the best of both worlds. The efficiency of the stock oil cooler and the all coolant will be filtered before it enters the oil cooler. I also live in a cold climate and the stock oil cooler will act as a heat exchanger helping the engine warm up.
 

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Thanks for the info I live in southern calif and the summer temps are in the high 90's and i want to just keep the engine cool. Looking to get the most bang for the buck when I'm thinking about dropping $4000 or better into the truck
 

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Those deltas look really good, 6* while pulling up a steep grade, you can't ask for better deltas towing. You will not gain anything in terms of deltas running both the bpd oil cooler and IPR coolant filter. The bpd kit is a air cooled oil cooler, no coolant involved. I'm not saying that there will no benefit of running both, because a clean coolant system will work more efficiently than a dirty one.

Personally I think the stock oil cooler is very efficient but it has a fatal flaw, the passages are to small, therefore clogging. The bpd oil cooler is not as efficient you will see much higher deltas while towing, but they are redesigning the exchanger to aid this.

I ordered the IPR external oil cooler and the high flow coolant filter, so I should have the best of both worlds. The efficiency of the stock oil cooler and the all coolant will be filtered before it enters the oil cooler. I also live in a cold climate and the stock oil cooler will act as a heat exchanger helping the engine warm up.

Let's clarify a few things. A 6* temp difference while towing IS good, but I understand the concern with the 240* oil temps. I'd want to bring those down also.

Please explain your statement about the BPD oil cooler not being as efficient as the OEM oil cooler. Under most driving conditions its MORE efficient and your EOT < ECT. I don't think you understand the term delta, which means difference, because while you may see higher deltas (difference between ECT and EOT) when towing with a BPD oil cooler, its not an issue because oil temp is not dependent on coolant temp with the BPD system. You are correct in that BPD is testing different heat exchangers to accommodate people who either tow heavy (20k lbs or more), have low gears (equivalent of 4.30's or lower with stock tires), tow at altitude, tow at low speeds, or a combination of the preceeding. Maybe 5% of the potential customer base at best. Some of these owners have experienced high EOT's, but keep in mind that you can have a custom SCT program written to turn the fan on at a specific EOT, and this will bring the EOT down. An improved heat exchanger is being tested so a custom tune isn't needed, which will be advantageous for folks who own/maintain a fleet of 6.0's.

In addition to the small passage fatal flaw you mentioned, the OEM cooler will allow oil to get into your cooling system if it ruptures. The BPD kit completely separates your oil and coolant paths and there's no chance of cross contamination. One other advantage the BPD kit offers is the replacement of the OEM oil filter with a canister style filter. That means no more oil filter felt clogging the HPOP screen. Oh, and it'll be nearly impossible to clog the BPD system.

Hope this helped provide some clarification.
 

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Let's clarify a few things. A 6* temp difference while towing IS good, but I understand the concern with the 240* oil temps. I'd want to bring those down also.

Please explain your statement about the BPD oil cooler not being as efficient as the OEM oil cooler. Under most driving conditions its MORE efficient and your EOT < ECT. I don't think you understand the term delta, which means difference, because while you may see higher deltas (difference between ECT and EOT) when towing with a BPD oil cooler, its not an issue because oil temp is not dependent on coolant temp with the BPD system. You are correct in that BPD is testing different heat exchangers to accommodate people who either tow heavy (20k lbs or more), have low gears (equivalent of 4.30's or lower with stock tires), tow at altitude, tow at low speeds, or a combination of the preceeding. Maybe 5% of the potential customer base at best. Some of these owners have experienced high EOT's, but keep in mind that you can have a custom SCT program written to turn the fan on at a specific EOT, and this will bring the EOT down. An improved heat exchanger is being tested so a custom tune isn't needed, which will be advantageous for folks who own/maintain a fleet of 6.0's.

In addition to the small passage fatal flaw you mentioned, the OEM cooler will allow oil to get into your cooling system if it ruptures. The BPD kit completely separates your oil and coolant paths and there's no chance of cross contamination. One other advantage the BPD kit offers is the replacement of the OEM oil filter with a canister style filter. That means no more oil filter felt clogging the HPOP screen. Oh, and it'll be nearly impossible to clog the BPD system.

Hope this helped provide some clarification.
Yes, I understand that with the bpd cooler deltas are not of concern, they are only valid in testing the oem oil cooler. I intended no pun on the bpd kit, I think it is a great product. Once they come out with the new exchanger to help eot stay lower while pulling it will be even better. The only concern I have with controling the fan off eot is that coolant temp drops a lot faster than oil and can cause the coolant temp to drop too far. This will impact trucks in colder climates more. Ect and eot temps need to rise and fall at the same rate and with the redesigned exchanger from bpd that should happen.

As long as you keep the oem oil cooler in good health there is virtually no concern of it rupturing. The chances of that happening are about the same as one of the oil lines bursting on the bpd kit and dumping all your oil on to the ground.

Both kits have their advantages, you will have to weigh the options and see which one will suits your needs better. For my build I decided that the IPR kit is better for my needs.

Sorry for the derail.
 

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The only concern I have with controling the fan off eot is that coolant temp drops a lot faster than oil and can cause the coolant temp to drop too far. This will impact trucks in colder climates more.
The coolant thermostat regulates the engines temperature. If the coolant temperature is dropping to far, your thermostat is defective. It has nothing to do with fan operation and oil temperatures.
 

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I live in Alaska, and work in the arctic circle trucks have a hard enough time staying warm with the heater on. If you have been in severe cold you would know what I am talking about. There is a reason why we run cold fronts in the winter, it has nothing to do with the thermostat. When I tow heavy in the winter I can reach 225*, due to the cold front, but when the fan kicks on 100% the motor cools very fast. If the fan stays on trying to cool the oil yes it will drop the engine temp.
 

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The coolant thermostat regulates the engines temperature. If the coolant temperature is dropping to far, your thermostat is defective. It has nothing to do with fan operation and oil temperatures.
Beat me to it. Regardless of ambient temps, your coolant temp shouldn't drop so far so quickly that it'll be an issue unless something else isn't working correctly (read thermostat). And if the fan is set to come on 100% at a certain EOT (like 220*)....

I think I took exception to the "BPD cooler not being as efficient" as OEM. Simply not an accurate statement.
 

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I live in Alaska, and work in the arctic circle trucks have a hard enough time staying warm with the heater on. If you have been in severe cold you would know what I am talking about. There is a reason why we run cold fronts in the winter, it has nothing to do with the thermostat. When I tow heavy in the winter I can reach 225*, due to the cold front, but when the fan kicks on 100% the motor cools very fast. If the fan stays on trying to cool the oil yes it will drop the engine temp.
Maybe in extreme cases as in your example. Though if you take your logic full circle, your application, to which you base your coolant dropping statement on, wouldn't require an oil temp based fan program in the first place. Therefore your original concern wouldn't exist.
 

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Maybe in extreme cases as in your example. Though if you take your logic full circle, your application, to which you base your coolant dropping statement on, wouldn't require an oil temp based fan program in the first place. Therefore your original concern wouldn't exist.
Don't forget about the cold front, it doesn't just cover the radiator it would cover the bpd oil cooler also.

My point is coolant and oil need to cool at the same rate isn't that why you guys are testing a larger exchanger to help cool the oil faster while towing. If the fan kicks on and cools both oil and coolant at the same rate there would be no need to run the fan off eot.

Again I think that the bpd oil cooler a great product, I did my research and decided that it isn't what will suit my needs. That is all.
 

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My point is coolant and oil need to cool at the same rate isn't that why you guys are testing a larger exchanger to help cool the oil faster while towing.
No.

BPD is testing different heat exchangers to ensure the 1% potential (or current) owners have a 100% solution. Because an air to liquid exchanger is used, the cooling ability of the exchanger is dependent on ambient temp, ambient air density, air flow across the exchanger, and the flow rate of the liquid through the exchanger. If you are towing heavy (20k lbs or more) at very slow speeds, there may not be enough air flowing across the exchanger to keep the EOT where you want it. Same situation at high altitudes where the air isn't as dense. People who have high gears (numerically high, like 4.30's or higher) on stock tires turn higher rpms than a truck with 3.73's, especially when towing heavy (again, 20k lbs or more). The extra rpms also increase the oil flow rate through the heat exchanger and it may move through too quickly to be cooled to the desired temp. These types of situations impact a very small percentage of 6.0 owners, but BPD is taking that extra step to ensure as many people as possible can take advantage of their product.

The research and testing of the heat exchanger has nothing to do with trying to cool the oil and coolant at the same rate.
 

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Don't forget about the cold front, it doesn't just cover the radiator it would cover the bpd oil cooler also.
I didn't forget.

My point is coolant and oil need to cool at the same rate isn't that why you guys are testing a larger exchanger to help cool the oil faster while towing. If the fan kicks on and cools both oil and coolant at the same rate there would be no need to run the fan off eot.
No, it's not why we are testing a larger cooler. The cooler we sell is very capable of removing the BTUs needed. We are testing a larger cooler to address the needs of a fleet of emergency vehicles. It just so happens that the larger cooler may be of interest to a select group of truck owners as well.

Again I think that the bpd oil cooler a great product, I did my research and decided that it isn't what will suit my needs. That is all.
Thanks! I would imagine that in your application, during the winter the heater core is as large a radiator your vehicle needs... BRRRRR!
 

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So, what's the consensus on the IPR external oil cooler combined with the high flow coolant filter?

How many are out there installed?

Any more feedback?
 

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consensus? I have one and I love it! Everyone who has them seems to give positive feedback.
Do you have any pictures showing the external cooler and high flow filter? I saw your earlier pictures, but did not see the high flow filter. Are you catching a lot of crap in the high flow?

What are your deltas now?

There was some earlier concern on this thread over output oil pressure.....then the debate kinda fizzled out. Any update on the output oil pressure from the remote cooler? Did Vinnie do any testing on this subject?

Thanks! :D
 
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