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Basically, all I use my truck for is towing my 11k pound 5th wheel camper. I am considering installing a BD in-line ( not turbo mount) exhaust brake on my 2001 7.3 f350 AT. I have already done the EBPV delete so this is my only option left. I was wondering how many members currently use one and if so, are you please with its performance. I assume no one has had any issues with valve float as long as you are using one designed for the 7.3.

Thanks in advance,
Bryan
 

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I have the Banks Exhaust break. So far i like it. I have not had a chance to use it in the mountains with the trailer yet. I have used it in the mountains without the trailer and i have no complaints. I have been able to go down mountain grades without hitting the break pedal at all. I have seen some lower EGT from normal driving with it. maybe about 100* over before it was installed. Im guessing cause i took the stack EBPV out and the banks butterfly is further down in the exhaust flow then the stock butterfly. From what i have read you have to get a torque converter lock up (banks smart lock) or else you will just raise trans temp cause the converter is not locked up while the break is engaged. I have heard if you use a break while the converter is not locked up it will cause trans temp to rise.
 

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you have to be careful with those from what i have been hearing is that they can float the valves do to the back pressure....

just what i have heard from the interwebs, not sure if there is any proof in it...
 

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Is their a way to tell if the valves start floating? Will the sound of the motor change or anything?
 

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This was originally posted on a Tuners website (I forget who) and is the reason for the concern;

Do you offer a "decel" or "exhaust brake" calibration?

Simply put, no, we don't because it goes against our business philosophy which, in part, is to provide safe, reliable products to our customers.

For those who don't know, this is a calibration that uses the EBV (Exhaust Backpressure Valve) as a makeshift exhaust brake. While this setup may work reasonably well for lightly loaded vehicles, we generally do not recommend this type of calibration... at least not for automatic transmission vehicles. There are a few reasons we don't recommend this.

First, in order to transfer the energy of the moving vehicle to the engine during deceleration, two things must occur: the torque converter must remain locked, and the coast clutch must be engaged. The problem with this is that the coast clutch on a stock transmission only has 3 friction plates, and these are smaller than the standard forward clutches. On 2001 and later transmissions, you also run the possibility of damaging the intermediate sprag or "diode," which will result in an immediate transmission teardown. Again, lightly loaded vehicles would have less of a problem with this, but the general idea of an exhaust brake is to be able to slow larger loads without overheating the standard brake system. It is these types of loads that can cause transmission damage. Obviously, a manual transmission would be free from these types of situations.

Second, whenever you increase exhaust backpressure, you need to make sure that the exhaust valve springs are capable of preventing the pressure in the exhaust system from lifting the exhaust valve from the valve seat, as this would result in a collision with the piston. Normal valve spring seat pressure is 70-75 PSI for NEW valve springs and deteriorates from there. Given that the surface area of the back of the exhaust valve is approximately 1.9 square inches, it would take only 40 PSI of exhaust pressure to lift the valve off the seat, even with new valve springs.

To put it simply, if you plan to use an exhaust brake, either through the use of the EBV or by purchasing an aftermarket stand alone unit, you will need to consider the condition of your transmission and exhaust valve springs in order to ensure safe, reliable operation.
 

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Interesting......

My thought on the "valve float" is that the only time that exhaust port pressure would be higher than cylinder pressure, AND the piston is close enough to TDC that the valve could hit it would be at the very beginning of Intake valve opening. At the top of the exhaust stroke, cyl pressure is going to be higher than port pressure (the flapper is closed, so the exhaust stroke is just another 'compression' stroke) so no possibility of the Exhaust valve being 'blown open' until the cyl pressure is lower than the port pressure behind it. I don't know how much overlap, or how far BTDC Intake opening begins in a Powerstroke cam, but once the piston is moving downwards, the piston can't really damage the exhaust valve if it does hit it. Another consideration with valve float is that pushrods, rockers, lifters and the cam can be damaged by the valvetrain banging back together.

Has anyone actually seen damage in a Powerstroke that was caused by exhaust brake valve float, or is this pretty much hypothetical?


The transmission concerns on the other hand do make sense. I have a Pacific Brake in my 99, and the last couple of times I attempted to use it, it didn't slow the truck down. Even in "overdrive off", there is no engine braking. I suspect something may be developing in the trans. For now, I just don't use the Pac Brake. Not to mention the flapper got stuck closed. I wondered WTF was wrong with the truck. It couldn't get out of its own way. I don't tow heave enough chit to need an exhaust brake. Eventually I'll take it off, but for now its unplugged, and I don't use it.
 

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I'm interested to hear about actual people with FIRST hand experience with engine damage from exhaust brakes . Everyone seems to jump on the internet bandwagon spreading nonsense that they heard could happen by someone that made it up . I personally have had a BD remote mount brake on my truck for 100k plus miles and my truck now has 250k on it with zero issues . I tow 7-8k pounds regularly (bobcat +trailer) and my heavy toyhauler that's 11k dry and the brake works great . Saved a lot of brake pads over the years . I swapped to a zf6 right before I put the brake on so I don't know what auto issues come from the brakes but I do know you need a torque converter lock to be able to use the brake .
 

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Everyone seems to jump on the internet bandwagon spreading nonsense that they heard could happen by someone that made it up .
The source for the quote I posted was from this link, that no longer exists on their site, as their entire "FAQ page" is now gone -> http://www.gopowerhungry.com/_faqs.shtml

So the "someone that made it up" would appear to be Bill from PHP :wink[3]:
 

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When I worked for the state as a wildland firefighter, I drove an 01 F550 with a manual, 7.3, and a Pac Brake. It worked okay. It had around 100k on it I think, and had the brake on since day 1. No issued that I was aware of.

I was going to convert my current 7.3 to activate the EBPV, but it was leaking so I deleted it. Now when I load up with the camper and Jeep I wish I had converted.
 

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That's all I need to see to know that my 7.3 will not get an exhaust brake.
I look at it a different way. you can put just an exhaust break on and take the chance of destroying stuff but if you do the right supporting mods it will work just fine for a long time. If you have an auto and do the trans and torque converter upgrades and upgrade the valve springs you will be ok.

Same with anything else. You can put in huge injectors in but if you don't do supporting mods you are just wasting your money.
 

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That's all I need to see to know that my 7.3 will not get an exhaust brake.
Maybe just call the people who make it, and ask what, if any, precautions you need to be aware of.

Diesel Emission Valves, Engine Brakes and Exhaust Brakes


If I keep my current truck much longer, I'll be adding one back in. My aim is a 6.0 with a turbo brake tune.
From what i have gathered from the conversation there are two people that have first hand experience with exhaust breaks. One has one now with no complaints and one had one prior and is thinking would do it again. Im just saying.
 

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Basically, all I use my truck for is towing my 11k pound 5th wheel camper. I am considering installing a BD in-line ( not turbo mount) exhaust brake on my 2001 7.3 f350 AT. I have already done the EBPV delete so this is my only option left. I was wondering how many members currently use one and if so, are you please with its performance. I assume no one has had any issues with valve float as long as you are using one designed for the 7.3.

Thanks in advance,
Bryan
You can get the banks break and smart lock. If you get the banks break you would have to remove your EBPV housing anyway. So it doesn't matter if it has the butterfly valve or not.
 

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Here is the Banks break
 

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If PHP says not to do it... I wouldn't do it. Bill knows the 7.3/6.0 engine platform. I would take his advice to the grave.
But why did he say don't do it? For the trans which you can upgrade and for the valves which you can upgrade. Would you build a top end to produce 800HP and not replace the PMR? No but if you build the bottom end to support the top then you will be ok. Same thing here. What if you have a ZF6 then the trans issue is ok from what i have read and just have to worry about floating the valves. I think it was about 75 PSI the valves float at but if you upgrade those it would be ok in my mind.
 

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90% of people who tune are running stock stuff. So my guess is he based it off that. And then it comes down to I did it for him/her now I have to do it for everybody.
 
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