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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My V3 & tank should arrive in 2-3 weeks but after reading some of the posts here I am wondering if I need a heated tank. I am in North Texas and it is hot here now but will I be able to run wvo in the winter without a heated tank? I know chenry is in OK...are you running a heated tank? Anyone else with a wvo system running a non heated tank? I ordered the 60 gallon toolbox/tank combo. Thanks
 

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I don't know of anyone that is running WVO who wants to run all year long without it. (It even gets cold in the desert at night,,) Otherwise it can wax up too easy and clog the pump and filter. RIGHT? The guy I know running it built his own tank, and ran his coolant lines back to it, in the bottom, he has a second layer with the coolant running through it. (Runs like a maze I think, across, and back ect...) throughout the whole bottom of the tank. It added something like 4 more gallons of capacity to his coolant! There is a temp gage on the tank, and he knows when to switch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

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The tank NEEDS to be heated. The oil needs to reach at least 140 degrees, and better yet upwards of 180 degrees to get the viscosity down close to pump diesel. The ambient temp has nothing to do with it (unless texas sees 140 regularly) It's not so much the fuel gelling, its the viscosity for the pumps.
 

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So many misconceptions still around about this subject.
The fass fuel pump on the V3 could pump gravel uphill so the viscosity of the oil will not effect this pump.
The temp of the tank has nothing to do with switchiver times either and ambiet outdoor temps do infact play a role in this. If you motor and coolant is 20 degrees with you start up, it will take longer to switch over because the temp switch is located inline with the coolant and when the coolant hits 140*, the system switchs on.
This hot coolant will heat the V3 module thus heating the vegi flowing through it. There are 4 heat exchangers in the V3 system. The first being the heated tank. The tank heat will never reach 140 except maybe in the summer on a long trip. In theory the tank is your first heat bump...lets say it heats the oil 15 degrees above ambient temps outside. so its 90* rather than 75 when it gets picked up in the fuel line. It then travels along the heated HOH which esentially keeps it hot and maybe heats it a little more untill it flows through the module which is heat exchanger # 2 and that bumps it another 20* to 110* (these numbers are hypothetical as i have never tested temps along the lines). Then the oil goes through the heated filter and bumps anotehr 20* to 130* Now the oil will enter the fuel rail in the head and become heated to over 200* in seconds before it gets injected.
IF you omit the heated tank, take 15* off of this process so the oil maybe only 115 when it reaches the heads and it will still get heated in the rails.
In winter the ambient temps. sets the starting point for this process so you can see if your startingout with 20* oil, you NEED heat in the tank. If you live in Panima City and you start out with 90* oil everyday all year long, you do not need tank heat at all.
No matter where you live, if you vacation to 10,000 feet above see level in the mountains in august you will not be able to use your system.
Get the heated tank.
 

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So many misconceptions still around about this subject.
The fass fuel pump on the V3 could pump gravel uphill so the viscosity of the oil will not effect this pump.
The temp of the tank has nothing to do with switchiver times either and ambiet outdoor temps do infact play a role in this. If you motor and coolant is 20 degrees with you start up, it will take longer to switch over because the temp switch is located inline with the coolant and when the coolant hits 140*, the system switchs on.
This hot coolant will heat the V3 module thus heating the vegi flowing through it. There are 4 heat exchangers in the V3 system. The first being the heated tank. The tank heat will never reach 140 except maybe in the summer on a long trip. In theory the tank is your first heat bump...lets say it heats the oil 15 degrees above ambient temps outside. so its 90* rather than 75 when it gets picked up in the fuel line. It then travels along the heated HOH which esentially keeps it hot and maybe heats it a little more untill it flows through the module which is heat exchanger # 2 and that bumps it another 20* to 110* (these numbers are hypothetical as i have never tested temps along the lines). Then the oil goes through the heated filter - heat exchanger # 3 - and bumps anotehr 20* to 130* Now the oil will enter the fuel rail in the heads - heat exchangere # 4 - and becomes heated to well over 200* in seconds before it gets injected.
IF you omit the heated tank, take 15* off of this process so the oil maybe only 115 when it reaches the heads and it will still get heated in the rails.
In winter the ambient temps. sets the starting point for this process so you can see if your startingout with 20* oil, you NEED heat in the tank. If you live in Panima City and you start out with 90* oil everyday all year long, you do not need tank heat at all.
No matter where you live, if you vacation to 10,000 feet above see level in the mountains in the Fall you will not be able to use your system. I have seen temps after the filter above 200 degrees in the hot summer so actually you can unplg the fuse to your heated filter in summer time as it is not needed and this will put less draw on your alternator.
Get the heated tank.
 

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It's not so much the fuel gelling, its the viscosity for the pumps.
Actually if you ever use Partially Hydrogenated oil, it solidifies at around 55* and if you have no tank heat it can not be sucked up in the fuel pickup line so gelling is an issue to think about. I delt with this last winter and my hotfox heater was not man enough to melt it as fast as the motor consumed it.
 

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Actually if you ever use Partially Hydrogenated oil, it solidifies at around 55* and if you have no tank heat it can not be sucked up in the fuel pickup line so gelling is an issue to think about. I delt with this last winter and my hotfox heater was not man enough to melt it as fast as the motor consumed it.
Thansk for clarifying everything. I understood most of it, but did a terrible job explaining it, but I still learned a few good things out of that post. The hydrogenated oil I've decided against using, so I didn't really research that at all, and did not know it had these characteristics, so thanks for that as well.

So you do use the hydrogenated oil? From everythign I had read, it seemed it was better to just stay away from it...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Here is Jason's reply from Dino Fuel Alternative's.

"Don’t sweat it Marty, your tank comes built with the heat exchanger in it. It will be up to you, to you make the choice not to use it."
 
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