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The most critical part of the threads is where the nuts reside. (馃き) Corrosion pitting on the threads will increase the friction, and there won't be as much preload (clamping force) as a higher amount of the stated torque force will go to the increased friction. So inspect the nut and final resting nut threads. With the ARP lube, hopefully, they will be fine.

Any rust on the top of the stud can be removed. While you could use a spinning wire wheel, I'd recommend getting some Evapo-Rust from Amazon or Tractor Supply to soak the rusted area for a few days. Do not use any acid, which inches vinegar. Any acid will cause hydrogen embrittlement in the steel. While that is always a concern for hardened steel like the studs are, I never use acids anyway. It still occurs with milder steel; it's just that softer steels are never stressed as high. Removing hydrogen from the steel also promotes rusting at a higher rate.

After soaking in Evapo-Rust, you can dress the threads with a wire brush. You will still have the pitting, which is not as smooth and increase the torque loss, but it won't be in the critical tensioning area if there is no rust under the nutted area.

The ARP discussion of reusing the studs is true, except parts never get rusty in their context of racing. In our applications like this, that's not true.

The issue you have with the bracket is that it's installed in reverse. You should have spacers that make the bracket sit higher off the manifold bolting area, so the lifting ring is more towards the center. One can also use a perforated steel angle ($8 Home Depot) or an Adele Clamp, as I have done repeatedly.

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You just need to soak the tips.

The bracket looks like it has the correct holes just missing the spacers. You could also use drilled out nuts as spacers.
 

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When I talked to a Fel-Pro engineer about gaskets, we discussed the what-if of tightening down a gasket, disassembling, then reusing the gasket. He said as long as the engine wasn鈥檛 started it would not be an issue, the sealer needs heat to set.

Hydro鈥檚 comment of sealant scraping is important.
 

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That's weird that the paint was removed. I use the product all the time, and it doesn't remove paint. It's why for me suitable for restorations. However, it does remove carbon and mill scale. I use it also to remove the mill scale on the steel I make the engine lift brackets. Mill scale is dull; these studs are shiny black. So I wonder now what the coating actually is.

If you take out the rivets, she could have several picture frames. I would only caution that you might want to go over the edges of the head gasket that she has. The edges can be razor-sharp. I cut one finger when I was taking the gaskets apart for analysis.
 

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I've kept parts in the solution for days without paint issues. It's something with the ARP coating, nothing you've done. I wasn't expecting that.
 

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Interesting.

I have paint come off when there was rust under it. I'm going to have to play with this more. There were a lot of parts with my truck I used this on and had to abrade the paint off afterward.
 

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I took some pictures and images of parts I was working on with this rework in case I was going to make a video about the painting - not sure I will. But I just grabbed some of the items and through them into a YT vid. No editing, and ignore the turbo housing. Not in sequence either.

This is after a two-day soak. One part of the /degas bracket did not have full coverage of the Evapo-Rust, so there was some rust remaining. But all paint that had a solid foundation was intact. Where there is rust under the paint, I had to abrade to get it loose.

While vinegar is much cheaper, it pulls out hydrogen and therefore we get flash rust. And even if you use vinegar first then Evapo-Rust, you can still have rusting although it takes a longer time.

YT is still processing the HD version.



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Based on my discussions with ARP, they chose the "standard" stud alloy to achieve slightly higher tension than the stock bolts. Period. The torque sequence is a general standard for preloading fasteners; the tightening pattern follows the manufacturer's work in determining even tension. That's it.

More specifically than International, Ford developed a revised sequence based on testing the contact load (PreScale Film) and possibly strain gauging the bolts when researching the issue. An engineering approach.

The Ford procedure follows a typical approach to settling a wide part with multiple fasteners, i.e., heads, manifolds, and high-pressure vessels, with a Torque/Angle approach. First, torque to compress the objects - flatten any bow and compress soft gaskets. Then angular rotation to wind the fastener to a specific length, the degree of turn based on the thread angle.

ARP had no interest in determining that using an engine and gasket assembly but did use the revised pattern or sequence. And due to the different fastener alloys and "clamp load" for the ARP studs and "yield load" of the stock bolts, along with the thread pitch differences between the two, you can't use the TTY procedure on the studs.

Torque is a measurement of 85% of the force it takes to overcome friction in the threads and under the nuts/heads. Angular tensioning is an application of fastener stretch.

Engineering analysis has shown that when you have compressive materials under preload/clamping load, they can compress over time. Most of our gasket thickness is stainless steel, with some folds and a sealant that compresses. That compression should occur at a much lower force than achieving full tension. But it does walk.

This is not new science; it's been known for years and is incorporated into the engine design. ARP engineers are not smarter than Ford engineers. So your materials and tensions are adjusted for all this. You can't overcome the poor design of a product you buy from a supplier (International). Who doesn't anticipate the bending moment your upgraded power requirements might be and allow the distortion across the head's width - but this has nothing to do with the fasteners; I just had to get that out.

The sequence I did was first to flatten and compress the gaskets using the torque values from the updated Ford procedure. Then spit the remaining ARP final torque value into segments. I also waited for 30 minutes between the second to last and the last torquing. Based on engineering studies, thirty minutes is the majority of post compression after a tightening/loading. It can continue, and in some cases of extreme importance, the wait time can be 24 hours. I plan on re-torquing the studs after 500 miles of service. We'll have to see if that ambition wains.

It would not be unexpected for the center studs/bolts to have a higher degree of relaxation. While the fasteners have the same tension across the width of the head, the gasket under the fasteners does not. The ends of the heads have a much higher clamping load per square inch of surface area and are stiffer due to the boxed end of the heads (less distortion).

If yo are at full torque value, then back off and re-torque at the final value. However, if the nut is off even a slight amount, the asperities between the thread and under the nut will be different, and will be subject to some relaxing over time. But the gaskets sealant will be compressed.

After my primary Mac computer is finished "restoring" from time machine, I'll add a pictorial of the gasket compression at the ends.
 

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The problem with the second hit of a previously applied torque is the static friction can be higher than the dynamic friction when the bolt/nut was torqued. Bolt torqued to 200lbft. The elastic tension decreases to what would be achieved at 190lbft. Static friction is higher than 200lbft, so the torque wrench clicks off, yet the fastener is at a lower elastic tension.

The only way to confirm is to mark the nut/head, back off, and retighten in a dynamic mode.

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This is not the video I was looking for, but it illustrates the elastic interactions between bolts of a round or rectangular flange. It's most likely why when Ford got into problem-solving of the 6.0L head failures, then changed the sequences from what International had done, to achieve a better-balanced result.

While this is a single pass, it still occurs with stepped-torque, although the variation is lessened.

 
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I believe that was my posting. After 95lbft, I marked the nuts and studs to measure the rotation to ensure the studs were elongated the same.
 

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I installed the driver's side with the head, front cover, and intake installed, but not with the filter's assembly.

Screenshot from video.

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I grabbed some screenshots from one of my reassembly videos. I had to force the dipstick in, holding it with pliers. I also filled the recess once it made it to the internal lip with TA-31 to prevent weeping in the future hopefully.

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Unfortunately, I didn't take a still image of it at the time, I was rushing to get the engine assembled. So the best I can do on the size. Grainy and not great focus.

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But the exhaust carbon/oil cake that builds on the intake valve and stem and then breaks off to pit the exhaust valves are not fond things.
 
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