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since we've had this really cold weather the past few weeks I've read on here that some are having problems with their fuel gelling and others saying they never add any anti gel and never had problems. then I read if you over treat its not good either. I've had a diesel for the past 17 years and never added a treatment for gelling until it gets down around 0 F. at that point I usually add some each time I fill up. I've used Ford's treatment, polar power and a few others. I always thought the rate on the bottle was just a guideline and the colder it gets the more you can/need to add. I know some I've used say you can go up to double that rate. I also assume the farther north you live, say Canada, the more treatment is added to the fuel at the pumps. I just wondered if most on here add any additional anti gel when they fill their tanks and at what temp. they start to add.
 
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A lot of the guys up north in the colder climates actual buy a blended fuel in the winter months. Where as my fuel stop offers one grade of Diesel. In the winter I assume the refineries add some winterizing agent to help with gelling. But it is still #2 diesel.

Across Montana, North Dakota and other cold places you will see a #2 Pump, a #1 pump and often a pump that offers, 25% 50% or 75% ratios of the two fuels. When it's sub Zero the truckers start running a mix or straight #1 to prevent gelling. #1 diesel has less BTU's in the fuel so you will get worse fuel mileage and it's also lack lubrication so you risk damaging parts that are lubricated by the fuel.

If you park your truck in a garage. It's not near as big a deal. Since your truck has a fuel heater that will circulate warm fuel back to the tank as you drive. So the main concern is how cold the fuel is before you start the engine. Leaving it outside at -25F give you a good chance of #2 diesel being gelled. Parked in a garage at 40F means it will start just fine and as long as you leave the engine run, the fuel in the tank will stay warm enough to not gel.
 
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