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Discussion Starter #1
Here is a sample from my water separator. From my eyes looks like there is not even a faint hint of any water there. I left it outside over night in -2f and it looks no different. Holiday diesel with Howe’s lubricator. Suppose to be -10f tonight so we’ll see if any clouding starts occurring.
 

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I don't know man... I see a giant snowflake bursting out of the sample jar.... hahaha joking but that looks like a clean jar of fuel to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Lol, had me going for a second there. That fuel is the best sample I’ve taken. I’m starting to fly the holiday gas station flag at my house now. They seem to have good diesel in the Mn twin cities metro.

Another plus to holiday is all of their premium gasoline is non oxy and ethanol free.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
-13f this morning and really still no clouding. I’m very impressed with this sample of diesel!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
lol, you southern boys always make me giggle when you talk about cold starts at +25F.

We just had -17F Thursday morning at our house. The coldest I've seen at my house was -39F last winter. This is air temp, not wind chill!!!

She gets cold in MN, I mean COLD. Nothing like them northern Canada boys or AK but still, flat out cold some mornings.

Anywho - The Howes I run in the winter is a anti-gel. In summer time, I run their meaner kleaner, just to get some lubricity and cetane boost. I no longer rely on the gas station to treat their fuel. When its -25F out and your driving thru northern WI at 11:30pm at night with no one around and your truck starts losing power because its gelling and your wife and 1 year old are wondering what is going on. You only do that once in your life and after that, you run an anti gel regardless of what the gas station sign says.

These 6.7's are little different that my old 6.0 and 99 jetta TDI. The 6.7 has a fuel to coolant heat exchanger so gelling is not as much of a concern as the heat exchanger warms up the diesel fuel. It can still happen but is not like my jetta or the older 6.0. In my 6.0 ford back in like 2009 I gelled up in Big horn mountains at 4am coming down the switchbacks. It was -20F and found myself laying on the side of the road changing fuel filters. That was a real experience.
 

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Nothing like actually using a water detector to detect water. If you have an airport nearby, stop by the fuel farm or the FBO, and ask for their expired shell water detectors. They’d probably just give them to you instead of throwing them away.
 

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Water can indeed come from the underground storage tanks at most filling stations, but paraffin crystal formation is the number one cause of "fuel gelling" in untreated fuel. Water would form ice crystals or a chunk that would block the pickup tube or lines, your WIF sensor would never 'sense' the solid form of water, so the warning light will never come on in cold temps

The Cloud Point is the temperature at which paraffin, which is naturally present in #2 diesel fuel, begins to form cloudy wax crystals. When the fuel temperature reaches the cloud point, these wax crystals flowing with the fuel coat the filter element and quickly reduce the fuel flow, starving the engine. Typical cloud point temperatures range from: -18°F (-28°C) to +20°F (-7°C), but may occasionally be as high as +40°F (4.4°C).

#1 diesel fuel (or kerosene) contains very little paraffin, and therefore has cloud and pour points near -40°F (-40°C).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yep, check out this fuel from fleet farm last year. I think it was only -10f when these were done last year. Lots of clouding. The red stuff is maybe from bio fuel being slipped in there. I have stopped using fleet farm after this test. Also, fleet farm does not post their temperature rating anywhere. Just days winter blend.
 

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Farm fuel around here is red -- yours looks brown in the pic?

I have no pics, but 3 years ago I done tests of my farm fuel and three different additives - and two also that were supposed to reverse gelling -- done the tests in my deep freeze so I could control the temps

Fuel that was pre-treated had decent results in two of the samples -- only one of the after gel treatments worked(PS-911)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
"Fleet Farm" not "Farm Fuel"

Fleet Farm is a outdoor mans mall in MN area.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I am not sure what that blob was, what ever it was did not look good. Luckily this was ran in my old 6.0 diesel that seem to eat anything you threw at it.

I will be keeping a close eye on the fuel I run in this new 6.7, I'll keep a clean mason jar on hand to view the fuel sampled out of the water separator with this truck.
 

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"Fleet Farm" not "Farm Fuel"

Fleet Farm is a outdoor mans mall in MN area.
My comment was to the color of your fuel sample -- farm fuel is red, road fuel is usually green -- The only amber colored fuel I have seen is Bio-fuel - it does not do well in the winter cold
 
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