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duct tape & zip ties
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As I said I would find my other post on here. But it is buried deep in the archives. So it is being reposted by me.


I know it is a lot of reading. But it is something we should all know as Americans.

STANDARDS of RESPECT
The Flag Code, which formalizes and unifies the traditional ways in which we give respect to the flag, also contains specific instructions on how the flag is not to be used. They are:

The flag should never be dipped to any person or thing. It is flown upside down only as a distress signal.
The flag should not be used as a drapery, or for covering a speakers desk, draping a platform, or for any decoration in general. Bunting of blue, white and red stripes is available for these purposes. The blue stripe of the bunting should be on the top.
The flag should never be used for any advertising purpose. It should not be embroidered, printed or otherwise impressed on such articles as cushions, handkerchiefs, napkins, boxes, or anything intended to be discarded after temporary use. Advertising signs should not be attached to the staff or halyard
The flag should not be used as part of a costume or athletic uniform, except that a flag patch may be used on the uniform of military personnel, fireman, policeman and members of patriotic organizations.
The flag should never have placed on it, or attached to it, any mark, insignia, letter, word, number, figure, or drawing of any kind.
The flag should never be used as a receptacle for receiving, holding, carrying, or delivering anything.
When the flag is lowered, no part of it should touch the ground or any other object; it should be received by waiting hands and arms. To store the flag it should be folded neatly and ceremoniously.

The flag should be cleaned and mended when necessary.

When a flag is so worn it is no longer fit to serve as a symbol of our country, it should be destroyed by burning in a dignified manner.



Note: Most American Legion Posts regularly conduct a dignified flag burning ceremony, often on Flag Day, June 14th. Many Cub Scout Packs, Boy Scout Troops, and Girl Scout Troops retire flags regularly as well. Contact your local American Legion Hall or Scout Troop to inquire about the availability of this service.





Displaying the Flag Outdoors
When the flag is displayed from a staff projecting from a window, balcony, or a building, the union should be at the peak of the staff unless the flag is at half staff.

When it is displayed from the same flagpole with another flag - of a state, community, society or Scout unit - the flag of the United States must always be at the top except that the church pennant may be flown above the flag during church services for Navy personnel when conducted by a Naval chaplain on a ship at sea.

When the flag is displayed over a street, it should be hung vertically, with the union to the north or east. If the flag is suspended over a sidewalk, the flag's union should be farthest from the building.

When flown with flags of states, communities, or societies on separate flag poles which are of the same height and in a straight line, the flag of the United States is always placed in the position of honor - to its own right.
..The other flags may be smaller but none may be larger.
..No other flag ever should be placed above it.
..The flag of the United States is always the first flag raised and the last to be lowered.

When flown with the national banner of other countries, each flag must be displayed from a separate pole of the same height. Each flag should be the same size. They should be raised and lowered simultaneously. The flag of one nation may not be displayed above that of another nation.


Raising and Lowering the Flag
The flag should be raised briskly and lowered slowly and ceremoniously. Ordinarily it should be displayed only between sunrise and sunset. It should be illuminated if displayed at night.
The flag of the United States of America is saluted as it is hoisted and lowered. The salute is held until the flag is unsnapped from the halyard or through the last note of music, whichever is the longest.


Displaying the Flag Indoors
When on display, the flag is accorded the place of honor, always positioned to its own right. Place it to the right of the speaker or staging area or sanctuary. Other flags should be to the left.

The flag of the United States of America should be at the center and at the highest point of the group when a number of flags of states, localities, or societies are grouped for display.

When one flag is used with the flag of the United States of America and the staffs are crossed, the flag of the United States is placed on its own right with its staff in front of the other flag.

When displaying the flag against a wall, vertically or horizontally, the flag's union (stars) should be at the top, to the flag's own right, and to the observer's left.


Parading and Saluting the Flag
When carried in a procession, the flag should be to the right of the marchers. When other flags are carried, the flag of the United States may be centered in front of the others or carried to their right. When the flag passes in a procession, or when it is hoisted or lowered, all should face the flag and salute.


The Salute
To salute, all persons come to attention. Those in uniform give the appropriate formal salute. Citizens not in uniform salute by placing their right hand over the heart and men with head cover should remove it and hold it to left shoulder, hand over the heart. Members of organizations in formation salute upon command of the person in charge.

The Pledge of Allegiance and National Anthem
The pledge of allegiance should be rendered by standing at attention, facing the flag, and saluting.
When the national anthem is played or sung, citizens should stand at attention and salute at the first note and hold the salute through the last note. The salute is directed to the flag, if displayed, otherwise to the music.


The Flag in Mourning
To place the flag at half staff, hoist it to the peak for an instant and lower it to a position half way between the top and bottom of the staff. The flag is to be raised again to the peak for a moment before it is lowered. On Memorial Day the flag is displayed at half staff until noon and at full staff from noon to sunset.

The flag is to be flown at half staff in mourning for designated, principal government leaders and upon presidential or gubernatorial order.

When used to cover a casket, the flag should be placed with the union at the head and over the left shoulder. It should not be lowered into the grave.


USFlag.org: A website dedicated to the Flag of the United States of America - Flag Etiquette

American Flag Etiquette | USA Flag Site
 

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Don't mind me
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The Salute
To salute, all persons come to attention. Those in uniform give the appropriate formal salute. Citizens not in uniform salute by placing their right hand over the heart and men with head cover should remove it and hold it to left shoulder, hand over the heart. Members of organizations in formation salute upon command of the person in charge.

The Pledge of Allegiance and National Anthem
The pledge of allegiance should be rendered by standing at attention, facing the flag, and saluting.
When the national anthem is played or sung, citizens should stand at attention and salute at the first note and hold the salute through the last note. The salute is directed to the flag, if displayed, otherwise to the music.

Great post Scott. The above part may have been changed for Vets and active duty. My Command Master Chief and myself were discussing this recently and he said you can salute while not in uniform if you are a vet or on active duty. I am still waiting to see it in writing though. I am still looking for the appropriate reg for that.
 

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duct tape & zip ties
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Great post Scott. The above part may have been changed for Vets and active duty. My Command Master Chief and myself were discussing this recently and he said you can salute while not in uniform if you are a vet or on active duty. I am still waiting to see it in writing though. I am still looking for the appropriate reg for that.
It was discussed at a Veterans Organization summit a couple years ago.

As a current, present, or past veteran. You may salute the flag with a hand salute when not in uniform. Because we area selective group that have been properly instructed on hand saluting techniques.

That change was made, but it was an informal change. Meaning it was never written into the flag etiquitte regulations.
 

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:usa:

Excellent post!!!
 

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Great post many people do not know the proper flag etiquittee
 

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Don't mind me
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This is an appropriate topic for this weekend. Please make sure that your flag is flown correctly.
 

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Let's go B's!!!!
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Giving this a bump cause the fourth is coming up, and people who don't normally fly the flag will be doing so. Fly it right, and treat it with respect folks! :thumb:
 

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I was just discussing flag etiquette with a PV2, and realized that not many people know this:

There are three items with the flag on any military base, either buried under it or hidden inside the truck (the ball on top). A match, a razor blade, and a single .38 round.
This goes WAY back... should you come under siege and lose, the last surviving person in the garrison is to get to the flag, separate the stars from the stripes with the blade, use the match to burn them, and then use the .38 on himself so he doesn't have to watch the garrison fall.
 

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great post:thumb: please correct me if i am wrong but i see alot of fire and other uniforms that have the shoulder patch on wrong. i was always told the union is supposed to always be the closest to the heart. so in turn the right shoulder patch would actually be sewn on backwards compared to the left shoulder. is this correct???
 

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Well, you're kinda right. The union always faces forward, but not to be closest to the heart. This is another one that goes way back (the Army has a thing for tradition). Think of the old civil war era battles... there's always the guy in front carrying the flag, leading the troops to battle. Well, going forward, the breeze will carry the flag and blow it so the bars are pointed backward, and the union leads us to battle. And so the union always points forward.
But for EMS and non military uniforms... I don't know if this applies.

Also, adding to my last post... it's a .38 because the first sidearms used by the Army were .32 and .38, .38 being the more popular one. Again, tradition.
 

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^^ thats more or less what i was told when i was in the Army. My DI said it was cuz we were running into battle.

I keep my flag up year around. I put a rather large HID light in the ground to light it up.
 

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It was discussed at a Veterans Organization summit a couple years ago.

As a current, present, or past veteran. You may salute the flag with a hand salute when not in uniform. Because we area selective group that have been properly instructed on hand saluting techniques.

That change was made, but it was an informal change. Meaning it was never written into the flag etiquitte regulations.
Flag etiquette either in the United States or in other countries has quite similar rules. When it comes to salute, a few years ago some Brazilian military athletes performed the hand salute in the 2016 Rio Olympic Games while on civilian clothes and some Brazilian media outlets got quite mad at it. But anyway, as a specific aspect of military doctrine, I would always expect either an active-duty or a veteran to salute the flag with a hand salute even when not in uniform.
 
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