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i have a 2015 powerstroke, how important is it to watch EGT while towing a 9000 pound trailer through mountains after a DPF/EGR delete,

thanks
 

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If its your first time towing after the modifications, then it is very important to monitor EGTs along with cooling temps, oil temps, fuel rail pressure to name a few. You want to make sure the tune is working correctly and monitoring is the most basic way to do so.
 

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As stated above, you should definitely watch your EGT’s these things can handle some Pretty hot temps but you still want to know if you need to back out of it if it’s getting to hot.
 

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I'd get concerned and start backing off around 1100 F. But it can go up to 1200 F no problem. Towing 9000 lbs you should not get close to that. Towing 6500 lbs I usually stay around 700 to 800 on flat ground
 

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I'm assuming a working DEF system helps lower the EGT? My truck is still stock/intact, so I haven't worried about my EGT when towing (typically less than 10K in flat-as-a-pancake Texas). Should I be?
 

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Def has nothing to do with engine egts.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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Thank you all, what’s a critical temperature you should be watching for?
I wouldn’t worry about egt temps until you start hitting the 1250° Mark then start watching them, but these trucks are made to and can handle much higher temps then the years past so I wouldn’t sweat it unless your creeping beyond that quick then maybe back out of it.
 

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It all depends on where the EGTs are being monitored, right? Could those quoting temps please include where it's monitored, OBD EGT parameters or an aftermarket sensor in the exhaust manifold for instance...
I wouldn’t worry about egt temps until you start hitting the 1250° Mark then start watching them, but these trucks are made to and can handle much higher temps then the years past so I wouldn’t sweat it unless your creeping beyond that quick then maybe back out of it.
 

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It all depends on where the EGTs are being monitored, right? Could those quoting temps please include where it's monitored, OBD EGT parameters or an aftermarket sensor in the exhaust manifold for instance...
That's exactly why I asked! I believe the most common spot right at the EGR block-off plate installed during a delete but I'm waiting to hear what these guys are doing.
 

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This response is kind of off-base, but I think it's somewhat relative. With my old 5.9L 6speed manual Cummins I could watch the EGT's decrease substantially by lowering a gear and raising the RPM's.

My understanding is that these new Fords have an automatic with the manual shift mode. If I were towing without a way to monitor exhaust gas temps in the mountains, I would without question fall back on prior experience and get those RPM's raised up. When I was still new to all this stuff it seemed kinda crazy to me to go from my standard towing rpm's, that were usually no more than 2500 rpm, and bump them up to 3200. The sound alone made me think "is this okay?"

Anyhow, anecdotal information based on a platform that is definitely different, but like I said, it somewhat applies.

Any of you seasoned V8 diesel owners see similar results when raising your rpm's? Does tow haul mode take care of that for you (as in automatically)? Are gauges (egt especially) a must have?
 

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From my understanding the reason you were able to lower EGTs by raising the RPMs is that with the added RPMs it tends to raise your boost pressure, which in turn is bringing in more "cold" air to the combustion therefore lowering the EGT. Can't remember where I was told this and also can't confirm that this is truly the case but somewhat makes sense to me.

As far as monitoring, I would say unless running super hot tunes or towing heavy on almost anywhere but Kansas, I don't believe you really need to worry about it. Also with that it can help you notice if something is getting ready to go wrong and you could possibly catch problems before a catastrophic failure happens, or as many of doby hopping on here and asking questions you will have that info.

I have a Edge CTS2 in my completely stock '16 6.7. I enjoy having the monitor to know whats happening and also do tow very heavy loads around most of the time when I am hooked to a trailer. Also with the truck being stock I like the fact that the CTS allows me to watch my regen and filter % (supposedly)
 
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Addressing a few questions here:
Stock trucks
2011-2014 trucks can use PID EGT11 as it should be the first OEM EGT sensor located on the DPF unit.

2015+ trucks have a OEM EGT sensor pre-turbo so use PID EGRT11 The reading will not go below 392* F since it's an OEM sensor. I would guess 392*F or below Ford doesn't care about EGTs.

Deleted trucks can use a OEM EGT sensor or aftermarket EGT sensor. They just need to fit into the port on the blocking plate then configured correctly on your OBDII device or data viewing device. (Torque App, or Insight CTS2/CTS3)

I would say dropping down a gear to bump up RPMs cuts fuel before it "adds more cold air". EGT's aren't effected as much as one would think with "cold air" within reason. Not to mention boost PSI holding at or climbing past 6 PSI sustained starts heating the intake air post-CAC more than you realize.

Any device used to monitor EGTs is a nice thing to have....not a requirement. Plenty of people out there run these trucks up and down hills with no notion of what their EGTs are doing.

For the cost and features the Insight CTS3 is hard to pass up. Just shop around for best price or wait till Edge runs a promo that adds on some EAS sensors.


While running to Asheville, NC up the hills the EGTs held high as boost PSI and vehicle speed were sustained. I was unloaded holding the posted sped limit. Never got too worried but the EGTs did get up over 1000*F easy. As soon as there was any change in the driving condition the EGTs dropped. I wouldn't suggest running 70+ MPH up those hills without watching EGTs.
 

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Thanks for chiming in on that theory I, for lack of a better term, "acquired" lol. As I was typing it out I was remembering much of what I learned on here and kept thinking, "that is opposite what you have learned reading more on this forum."
 

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You also don’t have to be in manual mode to lock out 6th. Can do that with it just in drive. I figured this out when my truck was stock. The shifting would drive me nuts on hilly backroads where I was only running 40-45mph.
 
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