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Discussion Starter #1
I'm gutting my EBPV and replacing my pedestal with a non ebpv model.

While gutting the ebpv I was thinking, would it be a good location for an egt sending unit?

I've never installed an egt sensor, so I don't know how large they are, or what the recommended location is. I think I've heard of the DP being a good spot for one. But since I have a hole to fill in the EBPV, could I stick a sending unit in there?

Or is this location not going to provide an accurate reading?
 

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Go for it! I think it would be a good place. You just have to realize that your EGT's can get as high when your sensor is post turbo.
 

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Just plug the housing and put the egt in the manifold. That will give you the "real" temp.
 

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Shaking the Bush Boss
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+1 for the exhaust manifold! Why swap pedistols when you can remove the enternals and plug the hole?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
ok, so then the egt is generally stuck in the manifold?

I guess it doesn't matter which side?

If I stuck it post Turbo, my temps would be potential cooler, than the actual manifold? Would it be as much as 100 degree difference? or are we talking more like 10 - 20 degrees?


And if your sticking the sensor in the manifold, I wonder is there a dual temp sensor that could average the 2 sides, or am I getting to anal with details?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm swapping pedestals to get rid of the ebpv actuator. I don't really want to grind it off and have it welded up. Buying one from Beans is simpler for me.
 

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Shaking the Bush Boss
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Man, you can remove the acuator pretty easy....let me find the link. Yea, temps can be 100* off post turbo.
 

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Shaking the Bush Boss
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well, I cant bring up the video. On the back of the acuator houseing, remove the snap ring and plate...remove the acuator and rod...tap the acuator rod hole for a bolt...I but a nut and washer on the bolt just in case it wanted to back out...reinstall plate and snap ring.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
lol, ok my wallet is on hold.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
cool, thanks for the info. I did a bunch of searching as well and I think I found the video. It's on photobuck and I am not a member, so... I couldn't see it.
Login to a private Photobucket.com album
Guess I'll sign up.....
 

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Shaking the Bush Boss
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Ok, no go with the pics...sorry. Reomve the snap ring, tap on the acuator rod so it will knock the plug out of the housing. Install a bolt to plug the acuator rod hole, reinstall plug and snap ring. I did leave the solinoid in the pedistol,but its unplugged.

The only advantage to buying a non evbp pedistol, it may be easier to acess the back bolts holding it down in the valley.

If you can find/use brass nuts on the turbo/exhaust flange...wont be near as difficult to break loose next time.
 

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Shaking the Bush Boss
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I am a member, and it wont let me log in either. Shoot me your cell, and I'll try to shoot you the pics.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Pulled the actuator

My 2nd reason for wanting the non ebpv pedestal was clearance issues.


Are brass nuts strong enough? I was thinking about using some high temp anti seize on my original hardware.


I gutted the pedestal and will proceed to seal it up. I'll use the saved money for gauges. I plan on adding about 6:crazy:


Now that I have this apart, I just might grind it up and seal the oil passages. I would leave the solenoid installed, and only fill the feed and drain holes visible in the actuator cavity.

Any thought on that approach?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Ok, lesson learned. :doh:

Look before you leap. and in this case I should have looked further into the actuator cavity :(

There are more than 2 oil passages in there. At the end of the cylinder opposite the snap ring there is a deep channel that opens up to the turbo drain passage.

Now I have 2 choices, putty/epoxy/jb-weld, or go have my brother weld it right.

So since these are all zero pressure drain passages, do you think a JB-weld type product would work? Something like PC putty for metal or the high temp version?

My brother brings up a few small "family" issues, but it's doable.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
YES :thumb:
The turbo needs oil for sure, but it doesn't get it from the EBPV actuator cavity.

On the snap side of the cavity there are 2 ports, one is for incoming pressurized oil, and the one on the bottom of the cavity is for drain back when the EBPV is de-energized. Then there is the trough typy cavity at the rear of the ebpv cavity, I can only guess at what this one is for. The trough cavity exposes the drain back from the turbo. I don't know why it would be open to the plunger side of the EBPV, which is not sealed. This explains all the crusty oil build up on the shaft of the plunger, and then also all along that side of the turbo pedestal.

So some one please slap me if I got all this wrong :punish2:

I'm pretty sure I'm ok to seal all these up and not affect the turbo oil flow. At any rate, it's to late to turn back now. I'm going to putty up these holes and if it turns out I'm wrong, I'll buy a new pedestal :dunno:
 

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When you cover that oil drain tube, make sure it dosent get restricted. You'll have oil bypassing the seals in your turbo otherwise.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
All done with EBPV actuator

OK here is the final picture, you'll have to excuse my liberal application of PC Fahrenheit. I didn't want to have to redo it. :hehe:

So..... here ya go. Who wants to start the count down to failure clock?
I personally think I'll be good to go, I've used this stuff before.
 

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