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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

about a month ago i began running a Diesel Kleen additive with cetane boost to degel the fuel as the temps are getting below freezing here, I had the bottle laying around from a previous incident that i thought would be the solution, but after the issues I've experienced I am thinking this additive may be the cause or at least a catalyst to the issue. To make a long story short i am experiencing a misfire on cylinder 4 in addition to plumes of white smoke when driving ever since this additive was applied. Since then i took the truck into my diesel tech at the Ford dealership to take a look and his claim is that the additive could have caused the misfire. I figured additives are fairly harmless especially since the one i used is a typical "degeller". Although after the first time i used Diesel Kleen I blew up my high pressure fuel pump (CP4) and sent metal shards into the block, but again i did not understand how this degeller could cause such catastrophic problems. For those of you out there who have worked with Diesel Kleen could give some insight into this issue it would be appreciated, but going forward it is a product i cannot trust despite its positive reactions from the majority of members here.
 

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If im reading it correctly you are using two separate additives together to mix with your diesel?

The grey bottle has its own cetane boost so that combined with another additive I suppose could cause issues. but why not just not use the addative for a while, then try two tank of just diesel kleen, then two tanks of just diesel then two tanks of just the ford cetane boost and what happens?

I personally don't think it would only cause ONE cylinder to act up though. Its getting the same fuel to each so why would only one be having issues with the fuel?

Also Diesel Kleen has been used millions of miles on many types of diesels with zero issues so the high pressure fuel system failure was 99.995 chance the bad system ford dealt with mostly the early 6.7l systems and on occasion a report of new system failure.
 

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When i was driving truck, i dont think freezing temps were a problem. Only if it got down to 20 degrees or below. Thats when we had to idle our trucks through the night. In fact, the idle thing they had on the trucks, would shut the truck off after 5 minutes (california idle laws, pffft)...if it wasnt 20 or below.

Last year, my f250 was parked outside when it was snowing, though i dont believe it got into the teens, but didnt have a problem with fuel gelling. Is this really a major concern? If the fuel does gel, does it un-gel after the temp goes back up?
 

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I am far from being an expert but I have had 2 Duramax diesels. Now I had a power stroke.
I went through 3 winters here in western mass and never did any additives. We had times with cold snaps of single digits or below zero. I never had a problem. There is nothing in the owners manuals that say to add anything to the fuel. What am I missing?
 

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Last year, my f250 was parked outside when it was snowing, though i dont believe it got into the teens, but didnt have a problem with fuel gelling. Is this really a major concern? If the fuel does gel, does it un-gel after the temp goes back up?
Yes it can be a major concern if you use your truck in the winter and yes, it does un-gel after the temp goes back up.....but it takes a lot longer for it to un-gel than it took to initially gel. In our part of the world (you're in Portland area right?) service stations usually switch over to winter treated diesel with SOME anti-gel in it already around September-October area. This usually keeps the diesel fluid until around 10-15*F, then depending on the station and the mix (between B5, B20 nowadays) some folks may have problems with gelling. Gelling is an ounce-of-prevention's-worth-a-pound-of-cure kind of problem for sure, as it takes a long time to heat your lines with heaters to get it flowing again if there's not enough anti-gel. Basically "gelling" is when the paraffin wax part of diesel fuel gets cold enough to solidify....as long as you warm it back up again it'll go back to a liquid. Kinda like Jell-O lol. If where you get your diesel already puts enough in for winter to not see a problem, you may not have to worry about it. From what I've seen as a tech, most of the people with gelling problems are the ones that don't drive their truck everyday, so they'll go into winter with summer diesel still in the tank and then whoop there it is.

As to the OP, I'm gonna have to go with Justin and disagree with the tech about the misfire on 7. If it was the additive, it'd be hitting all cylinders (they all got the same fuel right?). However, it may be the cause of the smoke if it's trying to demulsify too much water in the system. When was the last time you drained your water separator? Newer common rail engines HATE even the tiniest amounts of water, so good maintenance on your fuel system and filling up at good stations is key.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If im reading it correctly you are using two separate additives together to mix with your diesel?

The grey bottle has its own cetane boost so that combined with another additive I suppose could cause issues. but why not just not use the addative for a while, then try two tank of just diesel kleen, then two tanks of just diesel then two tanks of just the ford cetane boost and what happens?

I personally don't think it would only cause ONE cylinder to act up though. Its getting the same fuel to each so why would only one be having issues with the fuel?

Also Diesel Kleen has been used millions of miles on many types of diesels with zero issues so the high pressure fuel system failure was 99.995 chance the bad system ford dealt with mostly the early 6.7l systems and on occasion a report of new system failure.


My mistake on the clarity, I used the same type of Diesel Kleen (white bottle) in two separate occasions and in both "trials" I had fairly large problems occur. the first time i used Diesel Kleen it was a cab-off repair, I am waiting on the verdict for the current incident from my diesel tech. I just find it odd that such major fuel issues have occurred right after I've used this additive, mind you i haven't had a single issue from the initial time i used Diesel Kleen (2015) until now so it does seem to smell fishy for the additive. But overall it was the same Diesel Kleen Cetane boost in a white bottle that i have used, i have not used the gray bottle yet.
 

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@Nighthwak285 yes, in Portland. I guess the addative they put in fuel is why I don't have a problem. Didn't know they put any in there at the station.

I didn't know about the winter fuel in the summer thing. Guess i better start driving truck more. But for the time being, its out of commission. Waiting on alternator.
 

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White bottle doesn't "degell" that should be the red 911. The white bottle is supposed to prevent it. The 911 and similar others use alcohols to thaw out gelled fuel, for lack of better description.

Alcohols are not the best for lubricity in a HPF System. That would be the only reason an additive could cause a failure. Ford is just doing their norm and blaming something else likely.

Here's a link to the SDS sheets for all power service stuff. SDS sheets have to be available to anyone, so we can see what's in each bottle.

https://powerservice.com/sds/
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes it can be a major concern if you use your truck in the winter and yes, it does un-gel after the temp goes back up.....but it takes a lot longer for it to un-gel than it took to initially gel. In our part of the world (you're in Portland area right?) service stations usually switch over to winter treated diesel with SOME anti-gel in it already around September-October area. This usually keeps the diesel fluid until around 10-15*F, then depending on the station and the mix (between B5, B20 nowadays) some folks may have problems with gelling. Gelling is an ounce-of-prevention's-worth-a-pound-of-cure kind of problem for sure, as it takes a long time to heat your lines with heaters to get it flowing again if there's not enough anti-gel. Basically "gelling" is when the paraffin wax part of diesel fuel gets cold enough to solidify....as long as you warm it back up again it'll go back to a liquid. Kinda like Jell-O lol. If where you get your diesel already puts enough in for winter to not see a problem, you may not have to worry about it. From what I've seen as a tech, most of the people with gelling problems are the ones that don't drive their truck everyday, so they'll go into winter with summer diesel still in the tank and then whoop there it is.

As to the OP, I'm gonna have to go with Justin and disagree with the tech about the misfire on 7. If it was the additive, it'd be hitting all cylinders (they all got the same fuel right?). However, it may be the cause of the smoke if it's trying to demulsify too much water in the system. When was the last time you drained your water separator? Newer common rail engines HATE even the tiniest amounts of water, so good maintenance on your fuel system and filling up at good stations is key.
I appreciate the insight, however i speculated the same thing about the white smoke at first which is why i exhausted the tank with the additive, ran it on a totally new tank, and the volume of smoke did not change compared to when there was an additive. Thats why i think it may be antifreeze leaking from a bad head gasket, this was until i got word of the misfire on cylinder 4, maybe a combination of both? In regard to the water separator that is actually something i have not looked at, I would hope that the water separator is checked/drained as needed when i take the truck in for its periodical maintenance (oil change, tire rotation, the works...). However if this is not something they check for can it extrapolate into larger issues if not drained? In reality i would not suspect my diesel tech to be negligent in areas like that as we know each other personally and has taken care of me well in the past, but if this is something outside of his scope that is a maintenance step i have to take, well then its probably full lol. Being my first diesel as a college kid i learn something new everyday!
 

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If you had enough water in the separator to cause an issue, the idiot light should have come in to tell you. One cylinder with an issue doesnt lead me to a fuel problem. Maybe a "fueling" problem, meaning injector. Or rings, head gasket or something.
Cummins actually approves of PS additives, so that lends some merit to the product.
 
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