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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had just put in a new (but used with under 100k miles) turbo in my 06’ 6.0. After test driving it for the first time, I pulled the intake off and noticed the fan blades on the turbo where chewed up like a chew toy after that one drive. Is it safe for me to drive the truck with chipped fan blades? I’m not noticing any driving differences except for slightly higher but not alarming egts. And I believe my mechanic hooked up the oil feed line incorrectly which starved the turbo of oil which caused this to happen yet caused an oil leak on right below the turbo and dripping down both sides of the transmission.
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An oil supply leak would not cause chipped vanes; ingesting something solid would. Since you did not do the install, the question would be if the used turbo was in this condition prior?

Poor lubrication of the turbo sleeve bearing can wear them and lower the rotational speed. That may have caused the higher EGT temps, or the turbo does not match the original vane design. There were a few changes to the turbos over the years.

I'd be looking closer at the vane at 11 o'clock. Chipped vane turbos have run for some time without issue, but it's not something I would care to do. You never know the fatigue, and there would have a minor balance issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good to know about the poor lubrication of the turbo sleeve bearing. That is something I have been seeing causing this issue on other threads. The turbo was fine when I bought it and I drove the truck about 4 miles after the install, then a noticed the chipped turbine and oil leak after the drive
 

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Did you prime the turbo with oil before starting the truck? This is one of the most common mistakes. Just rolling the start over without starting the truck will build oil pressure and prime the oil galley.
 

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Did you prime the turbo with oil before starting the truck? This is one of the most common mistakes. Just rolling the start over without starting the truck will build oil pressure and prime the oil galley.
Yes sir I had cycled the glow plugs about 5 times before starting the truck, because it’s had been sitting in cold nights. This should have allowed the truck to be primed with oil.
 

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How does igniting glow plugs circulate oil?
"It's a little known fact that the glowplug is a predecessor to the modern-day low pressure oil pump. Early glowplugs were instrumental in moving oil in and through a particular area within the truck's dynamic parameters..."

-jokester aka Cliff Clavin
 

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I wonder if these threads are related


 

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"It's a little known fact that the glowplug is a predecessor to the modern-day low pressure oil pump. Early glowplugs were instrumental in moving oil in and through a particular area within the truck's dynamic parameters..."

-jokester
Mine were instrumental in leaking all over my friend's driveways.

772522
 
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GD, you mean the prior situation where the other turbo vanes were chipped too? Maybe he likes turbos with hurt vanes.

ZMANN, By repeating the glow plugs cycle, the magnetic field is generated around the motor located in the heads. Repeated pulsing causes the oil residing in the oil pan sump to be levitated up into the block's crank and cam areas, enhancing the initial lubrication. I think I saw this on the show "Fringe", something that Walter was working on. Pulse wave technology.

Or someone thinks the glow plugs are sitting in the oil pan. Either way, at 5 GP cycles, I'm sure the FICM isn't happy with the diminished supply of electrons.
 
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06 6.0 drw 635 rwhp (retired) 08 KR build in progress
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Must have something in air filter assy to go through and damage the vanes if they weren’t damaged previously. Prelubing turbo is necessary or leave air tube off and hold the compressor wheel until engine starts and oil pressure is delivered. Used to do this on my Porsche engines once engine started I’d let go of compressor wheel
 

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What I see in the pic is a braided line. If that is the turbo feed tube, it needs to be swapped for a solid one.

For if the chipped turbo good or not, I don’t know. It does rotate at somewhere around 11k rpm, and IMO that does not balance it correctly and will start to wear it out quicker.

I’ve noticed on my cheaper grinding dies that are not built for high RPMs, when I put them on my die grinder, they are not rotating correctly. They still grind fine, they are just not balanced and the quicker rotation causes them to not rotate straight, but starts to arc the rod they rotate on.

If this is going on with your turbo and it shatters, the pieces have a long way to go through the CAC tubes and will most likely get stuck in the intercooler before going into the engine.

Is this scenario likely? Not sure.

Perhaps the shop that did the work can help in some way in replacing the compressor wheel. A good mechanic can do this in two or three hours. I’m not good. I’d take two or three days to do it.
 

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Has no one noticed the braided oil supply line? -- that can be a problem right there with oil flow

I agree, the turbo ate something from the air filter

EDIT: @ChrisSki noticed the line
 
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06 6.0 KDD Stage 2 Long Block and Heads, HD trans, BW 366, Ported Intake, Banks Hi-Ram Intercooler
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That's what it looks like when a screw or a nut goes through compressor blades. The remnants are prob in the turbo and/or intercooler. Being that the intake edges are damaged you sucked in a foreign object. We call that FOD-foreign object damage in my job. If the blade edges/tips along the housing and housing were scored up/worn that would mean the bearings went and you have end shaft play. You'll feel it if you wiggle the shaft. doubt your bearings went after one test ride but if they were starved of oil they're probably damaged. Usually you'd be burning oil and notice it. The oil leaks probably mean the pedestal o-rings got pinched or incorrectly/not installed. Just my thoughts.

Don't run that turbo until you've taken everything apart and cleaned it out, reverse flushed the intercooler, and changed the wheel. Might throw a good billet wheel on it while your in there. This could destroy your engine if shavings made it all the way through.
 

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Not to mention it but the diffuser ring around the outside is of the older style 6.0L turbos. Many people were able to pop it out in a vain attempt to make some sort of performance increase. Might add to intake sound but doesn't do much on the big scheme of things. When newer model year trucks (say 2005-2007) came out that ring area was a machined part of the compressor housing. To which any sort of mods to that area required the compressor housing to be removed and machined on a lathe.

But hey.....it's a new to OP turbo with 100k on it.

As seen here...2006 turbo as the article reads:
 
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