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Hey everyone. I just finished my install of a ccv mod/ delete on my 2009 f250 and would like to share my install process in the hopes of helping people like me with limited information make the best decision and install they can. I had a hard time finding solid information on the subject and it was frustrating to say the least.

What you will need:
- Nitrile gloves
- Shop rag
- Medium sized flathead screwdriver
- Small sized nippers (aka hoof nippers)
- One 1.25" worm gear hose clamp
- Six to eight feet of 1"id coolant hose
- One 60 or 45 degree 1"id bend hose
- One 1"id hose joiner
- 5 zip ties
- One 20oz. Pepsi bottle cap

1. Open the hood and locate the rubber hose leading from the oil filler cap to the side of the intake.

2. Insert your flathead screw driver into the "bow tie" of the stock hose clamps and rock back and forth until both clamps are loose.

3. Remove the hose and retain both stock clamps, as you will reuse.

4. Take your 1"id hose and tuck down and forward under the air intake tract then route down toward the passenger side and left of what looks like a canister bottle.

5. Proceed under the truck, grab the end of the hose and route parallel with the small heat shield wrapped hose and tuck behind the inner fender splash guard.

6. Reposition yourself, grab the end of the hose and tuck behind the steel L-flange and loosely secure with zip ties.

7. Insert one zip-tie into the other to act as one big zip-tie. Route doubled zip-tie through frame rail hole located on the bottom and then through the front most hole in the middle of the frame rail. Loosely secure hose.

8. Use your hose joiner and connect your 45 or 60 degree bend-hose to your loosely secured main hose (You shouldn't need clamps for a secure fit)

9. Pull your main hose just enough to take out any excess slack without pulling the entire hose out of the engine bay.

10. Now wipe off the oil filler vent nipple and connect your 1" id hose with to your worm gear clamp to the oil filler vent nipple and tighten adequately.

11. Double check to make sure you don't have a lot of excess slack under the truck then tighten all zip- ties adequately. Once tightened, clip all zip-ties to clean up look.

12. Now take the stock hose you removed and insert the Pepsi bottle cap into the side without the 45 degree bend. Make sure the top of the bottle cap is facing into the hose, and also make sure the bottom rim of the cap sits a tad counter sunk in the hose for proper seal.

13. Take one of the stock clamps and put it on the side opposite of the bottle cap (side with bend).

14. Reattach hose to the intake hose nipple and make sure the "bow tie" of the clamp is facing up and the end of the hose facing somewhat downward.

15. Using your small nippers, grip the base of the bow tie, and apply normal pressure to retighten clamp.

16. Start vehicle and check vapor and vacuum leaks. To check for vapor leaks, use a flashlight and backlight the hose. This will help see any leaks if you have them. To check for vacuum leaks, simply cover the end of the capped hose with your hand and feel if you have any suction on your hand. If you do then pull the bottle cap and re install a new one.

INSTALL COMPLETE!

After about 2 drives check and make sure your hose isn't getting burned by hot engine parts, if routed right you will be fine.

Final thoughts:

After I installed it my only regret is not doing it sooner. Looking at all the vapor coming out I get a warm and fuzzy feeling knowing that it's not going right back into my engine. If you idle your truck for long periods of time I would recommend getting a longer hose to position the exit near the rear bumper or under the bed to keep fumes away from cab. Another option is routing it into the exhaust but you really need to know what you are doing to get it to work right.

Now I know what you are thinking. "Why is he using a god d*** bottle cap?!" Well first there isn't a lot of vacuum pressure being exerted on the cap itself, most is being taken by air travelling through the intake filter. I am getting an aftermarket intake to boot and I didn't want to buy a hose cover and a clamp if it wouldn't fit on the new one. I also didn't have a 1"id hose cover to attach to the intake nipple and I had to make due. But after I used the bottle cap, I wouldn't use anything else. The cap needs to be jimmied into the hose and needs a pretty good amount of force to be seated flush. Thus insuring the hose is sealing around the cap. It's cheap, it's easy to install, and its EFFECTIVE! I would go as far as saying its better then a normal 1"id hose cover.

When I originally found a snippet from a forum saying to use at least a 1"id hose I was skeptical as it's a big diameter hose and I wouldn't think I needed one that big. But after the install I'm glad I did because there is a good amount of vapor that flows through.

And finally to those who say you need to do a closed-loop catch can setup and plum back into the intake because of the necessity of a vacuum, I disagree! There is plenty of pressure in the crankcase to not require a vacuum for efficient flow. As long as you don't have any pressure like wind blowing into the exit of the hose you will be golden.

I hope this guide helps all who read it, because I know this wasn't around when I needed the info. Thanks for reading!
 

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Thanks for the link, I like the look of that silicone but thats more than I want to pay at the moment!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the link, I like the look of that silicone but thats more than I want to pay at the moment!
I know, this is the only place i could find where they sold more than a foot of blue hose at a time. Im getting some parts from sinister diesel and wanted to match their blue color.
 

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One other question, are you worried about the oil vapors eating the coolant hose? Or is the silicone resistant enough?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well considering the stock tube from the oil filler to the intake is just regular rubber i will say the silicone will last longer than your truck will. And one other thing, some people say "the hose will drip out onto your driveway" that is also false. Sinse it is still vapor when it leaves the hose it never condenses in the tube anywhere to make oil drips. Just some more info for you and others who view this post.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Was wondering about this Mod. I've seen posts about this harming the seals?
it will only harm the seals if you dont use at least a 1" id hose. I saw your post in the neighorboring section about it relating to egrs. This is to keep the crankcase oil vapor from going back into the intake. The egr recirculates exhaust gas back into the intake. Two different things but both are good things to do to keep your 6.4 happy
 

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Any thought's about "scarfing" the end of the tube to a 45-degree angle? The old "road-draft tubes" they used to have on older cars (prior to PCVs) were scarfed in order to create a vacuum at the end of the tube in order to kind of help "suck-out (create a vacuum)" the vapors from the crankcase??? I'm a newbie to this group and know nothing about diesel engines...kind of wondering if buying my 2008 F350 dually, w/6.4 is a mistake after reading articles in this forum today !!! I love the truck, I've had it a few months, noticed the rocker arms are pretty noisy and the heater doesn't seem to blow as well as my older 2001 F350 7.3 used to. I upgraded because I wanted a newer interior basically.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Any thought's about "scarfing" the end of the tube to a 45-degree angle? The old "road-draft tubes" they used to have on older cars (prior to PCVs) were scarfed in order to create a vacuum at the end of the tube in order to kind of help "suck-out (create a vacuum)" the vapors from the crankcase??? I'm a newbie to this group and know nothing about diesel engines...kind of wondering if buying my 2008 F350 dually, w/6.4 is a mistake after reading articles in this forum today !!! I love the truck, I've had it a few months, noticed the rocker arms are pretty noisy and the heater doesn't seem to blow as well as my older 2001 F350 7.3 used to. I upgraded because I wanted a newer interior basically.
here is what i did awhile back, is this what you mean? I went from a 45 to a 25 angle piece
 

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Hey man thanks for doing this extensive right up. We were just talking about this and then I happen to find it looking for info!
 
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