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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
***NOTE: I am transfering most of these older posts over from another site, so if the text doesnt make sense, that is why***

Bought a new truck after I was hit in my Ranger, it was wrote off:



So I picked this up, and did a few things:

2001 Ford F-250 Super Duty 4X4, 7.3 Powerstroke Diesel, ZF-6speed manual, 187 000 km.



So far it has a 6" procomp lift, 315/75R16 BFG KM1's, flares, turboback 4" Magnaflow exhaust, AFE stage 2 intake, Superchips 1705 tuner.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
first things first... there was a bad clunk from the rear end, crawled under the truck, pulled the rear driveshaft, and this is what I saw:



so I replaced both rear driveshaft u-joints with new Spicer units, old vs new...



got them installed and painted the driveshaft.


The CV in my front driveshaft was loose, but I couldnt rebuild it, as the pin on the end of the shaft was wore out. Waynes driveline here in town quoted me 750$ JUST to cut off and replace the CV portion and balance it. Not gonna happen. So I got ahold of Tatton's Driveline in Tennessee.

GREAT guy to deal with, and will make you anything you want. I got a 1350 CV driveshaft with all new Spicer hardware, 7" of spline, 3" .120 wall DOM, high speed balanced, and made to my exact specifications....all for 385$ shipped. This thing is a really nice piece, and less than half the cost of a simple CV exchange at Waynes. Not to knock on Wayne, hes a super nice guy, but the prices are a bit outlandish considering.







 

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Discussion Starter #3
got some stuff for birthday








 

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Discussion Starter #4
Alright, starting to get this thing more prepared as a tow rig. Picked up a class V hitch, and got it bolted up. The truck is prewired for a a 7 pin connector, so piecing together my brake controller system should have been easy. Wrong. The connector at the end of the truck had been left open to the elements, and was road rashed to pieces, and useless.



So I pulled the small harness, and figured Id check out Ford and see what it would cost me for a new one....turns out the stealership wants 278$ for this little plug and wires. Ridiculous.



So I did what any sensible gearhead would do, and went to Princess Auto :grinyes:

Picked up a universal 7 pin plug for a chev



And proceeded to just splice it into the Ford factory harness.



Then covered it with loom, plugged it in, and zipped tied wires out of the way.



There was a spot under the hitch to mount the connector, but I figured that was a bad spot for it considering the junk I take my trucks through, and didnt want it to get beaten to pieces.

brake controller pic:




There is a plug inside the dash for the controller. I picked up a Ford specific pigtail that plugged into it, and the other end just plugged into the controller.

peace.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Okay, more parts to show....Im really starting a stock pile here, Id love some nice weather to get half of this stuff installed. Not to mention I have a 3 gauge A-pillar pod with pyro, boost, and water temp Isspro EV gauges on the way.

Figured since Id be toying with the cooling system, Id upgrade the thermostat and housing. The ford factory stamped housing is known to be crap, not seal, and rust out. So I got this housing from dieselsite, it is a machined billet thermostat housing bling bling! As wel from dieselsite is a 203* thermostat. It is made by International, and is a short stem unit that will not cut off the internal pump bypass, as the stock long stem units do. You may be wondering why Im bumping to a warmer thermostat, well long story short, International acutally designed these motors to run at about 203*, and up until 97, these are the thermostats that they had in them. The engines run better, and some guys have even seen an improvement in mpg. Either way I wanted to change it, and from my research this was the way to go.

 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well, didnt get my gauges in this weekend, but got a bunch of the Ranger parts moved/sold. Did however manage to install my pyro in the drivers side manifold tonight. A little nerve racking, but with shop-vac in hand it wasnt too bad. Drilling the hole, I just stepped up sizes until I reached 11/32. Than tapped it with a 1/8 NPT tap. Installed the fitting with some anti-seize, followed by the probe. Ill get to installing the actual gauges and other bits sometime later. Pics for clicks...





 

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Discussion Starter #7
Got a couple things done tonight,

Finally got my HPX (high pressure crossover) line installed. Pulled the 3rd plugs on each side of the cylinder heads, and got the JIC fittings in place, and then finally the connecting hose. As an aside, these hoses are available in both hard and soft lines. I would suggest always getting the soft line, as install was a breeze, just pulled the plugs and turned in the fittings. With a hard line, you would have to remove the intake spider.







Got my billet thermostat housing, and 203* thermostat in as well. There is a reason for these billet housings, the old one was a rusty thin piece of crap, just glad I caught it before something bad happened.





Boiled thermostat...it opens.



you can see the difference between the international thermostat, and the factory ford one.





And in place.

The HPX line definitely smoothed out the idle, and the engine seems a little more happy. For what little it costs, I would highly recommend this mod. Hopefully next weekend Ill get my coolant changed out for some ELC, and my coolant filter in place. I drained some coolant to be able to put my t stat in, and there was definitely some gunk in there.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, had some time tonight to dick around, and looking at the pile of parts I had sitting int eh corner for the duty, I decided it was coolant flush/change and coolant filter time.

First drained the old crap...its not ford gold, so I assume it had been changed before.



Thats only part of it, keep in mine that the 7.3 system holds 32 liters...yes thats right, 32 L.

Drained the block as well, and then plugged it up and filled with water. Ran it round the block, drained, filled repeated, until the water came out of the block clear.

Now for coolant, I used Rotella ELC (extended life coolant).



Now why ELC you may ask?

Well, as far as the water pump is concerned, ELC is silicate free, as well as being free from phsphate, borate, amines, and nitrates.

Green coolants, and others of teh conventional type all have those things. Our concern primarily is with the silicate, as over time silicates become insoluble and precipitate out of the coolant as microscopic abrasives. For those of you who dont know, silicate is basically (in its raw form) sand. Now keeping that in mind, the water pump on the 7.3L is not like other diesel water pumps.

The water pump on a 7.3 has a seal that is always exposed to the coolant. If the silicates find their way between the pumps seal and the shaft, it WILL cause failure.

There are a number of other advantages to ELC as well. It better protects against cavitation and corrosion. It has better heat transfer, requires less maintenance, and has a longer life.

So, in an attempt to even further make my cooling system bullet proof, I installed a coolant filter. First remove the plug in the side of the water pump on the drivers side.



Than installed a barb.



got my filter head ready; I installed ball valves, so when I change the filter I can shut them off, not waste coolant and minimize mess. Also note the temp probe for my gauge.



I preinstalled the filter and bracket. For those of you wondering, filters are about 10$ a piece.



got it installed



and then hooked up hose from the water pump to the head



and T'd it into the return line.



and filled back with ELC.



With my billet thermostat housing, 203* international short stem thermostat, ELC, and coolant filter, my system should be bullet proof, and help prolong the life of my baby :D



For those of you wondering if a coolant filter is ACTUALLY necessary, take a look at this, this filter was taken off of a 7.3 after the first 3 months of its installation,



Next project...oil filtration bypass system....and new parking brake shoes/hub seals.

-Nate.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Also got a chance to bolt on some bling today.

Before:



After:






Well figured Id make use of some time while I had it. So as it happens, the Bilsteins I had on my ranger (Bilstein 5150's, 12" travel fronts, 14" travel rears) were almost the perfect lengths in compared to my Duty. The pro comp es 9000's were kinda of crappy, and a bit rusty. Figured why not?! Anyways, heres a few pics. Truck rides a little better. Still like a dump truck, but better than it was.

front before:



front after:



rear shock comparison:



and installed.

 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well, didnt get anything done on the light/push bar, have to wait to get some steel, so I worked on my bypass oil system. I needed to make a bracket to locate the filter head, so I made one, out of 1/4" plate :biggrin:

came up with a design, made a template



traced and prettied up



drilled some holes, and had to make a bend in the bracket to fit the contour of the bell housing



cleaned it up



test fit



and test fit with a filter





will install it and the rest of the bypass system when I change my oil, but Im itching to get my light bar done first.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
did a bit of maintenance today.

on the agenda...



Id say it needs a cleaning ( I have 2 reusable filters, keep one clean so I dont have down time)



tapped into the block for an oil source



bypass oil system hooked up



new oil filterS



where the bypass drains to...kind of pimp



also changed out my coolant bypass filter, when I took it off, I could shake it and hear particulate rattling inside, glad I installed it.

on a side note, was making a drop at the dump, so got a chance to see what I weigh, this is with me and half a tank of fuel.

 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Put new parking brake shoes and hardware on the Duty...been putting this job off for a while, thought I may as well get it done.

First things first....remove caliper, remove axleshaft, and take off locknut. For those who dont know, left and right sides have DIFFERENT threads....LEFT side has LEFTHAND threads, and RIGHT side has RIGHTHAND threads. These Sterling 10.5's do not have a traditional 2 locknut system, its is like a keyed cartridge with a racheting locknut inside. You can also see the special locknut socket, it is a 4 pronged socket, with a cylinder that goes INTO the spindle, and then the teeth engage the nut. You can pick one up at any auto parts store, it is a sterling specific socket.



I ended up using a slide hammer to get the disc/hub off.



old brakes are gross.



new and old



ALWAYS spring for new drum brake hardware, makes things so much easier.



the cartridge type hub seals CANNOT be reused, taking the hub off tears them apart, and besides I found my passengers side was leaking. Old and New.





Then put the hub back on and locknut. For those who dont know, and may want for future reference, you tighten the locknut to 60 ft/lbs while turning it, then turn it back 7 clicks. That is Ford spec.

Axleshaft BEEF, 35 splines of goodness, also note there is no neckdown, and the axleshaft diameter actually increases at the splines.



Put new O-rings on the shafts.



Then put axleshafts back in....Ford spec on the axleshaft bolts is 80 ft/lbs.

And assembled the rest. Its AWESOME having an e-brake again, especially in a manual truck.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Did my CCV (crank case vent) mod today. Did it mostly so I could check out my turbo...but Ill talk about that later.

The stock crank case vents into the intake...its known to throw some oil in there and make a mess, plus why would you want crank case gasses entering the turbo.

air filter tube taken off, you can see the vent, its also restrictive.



parts needed....piece of 4" exhaust pipe, brass fittings, new o-rings for the dog house and some 3/4" heater hose.





remove dog house



cut the piece to length



this next bit is optional. I welded around the circumference of the pipe, and ground it down to act as a bead to ensure a good seal.



reason for the new o-rings...stockers were pooched



hose/fittings attached and new o-rings





installed



much less restrictive



installed



now about my turbo......

Been meaning to check it for quite some time now. There isnt any radial movement to speak of, but there is side to side (along axis of impeller shaft) movement. I setup my dial indicator and measured 0.020" (20 thou) of play...spec is 0.00079"-0.00394".....so Ive got about 5 times more play then I should.

I could just slap some rebuild parts at it, but I do not believe thats the correct way of doing it. I believe that an impeller shaft should be balanced after work has been done to it...anything spinning that fast needs balancing.

Not looking to make huge power with this truck, it already makes butt loads for my needs, hence the reason for not dropping the dough on a GTP38R.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Got my turbo in the mail.



also got my NON-EBPV turbo pedestal, and NON-EBPV exhaust housing





got the old turbo torn off....had to lay on a blanket on the engine...talk about tight



here is the old EBPV pedestal vs the new NON EBPV pedestal, notice the lack of solenoid and actuator.



and here you can see the EPBV vs NON EBPV exhaust housing, it is MUCH less restrictive, as you can see



this should allow the exhaust to flow much better, and sound better.

also note that the new turbo has a different compressor wheel, should spool better and cure my surge....and sound cool.

just in case anyone tries this, make sure you get new pedestal o-rings; they are known to leak over time, and are cheap.



and got the new turbo in. thats as far as I got tonight, it got dark and I was working outside, so Ill finish it up tomorrow.



peace
 

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before proceeding with final installation, I wanted to address my intercooler pipes.

here is the hot side pipe, it is wrapped in insulation and foil, from the factory it is supposed to quiet turbo noise....but I like turbo noise :D



stripped the gunk off it



the cleaned it up with a wire wheel, primed and painted; also did the cold side pipe.



while waiting for the paint to cure, figured Id put a new fuel filter in her



and everything put back together





still in the break-in process, but the turbo is much more noticeable, and the boost seems to come on quicker.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Ever since I bought the truck, the truck would seem to wander on the highway, and the steering just felt loose. Well, its to the point that you cant even turn the wheels with the truck at rest, and the play is ridiculous. All the TRE are tight, the steering shaft joint is tight....its all in the steering gear.

got the steering gear in and fluid changed, actually a very simple job.

First pull the airbox, battery (drivers side), and the battery tray. From here you have access to everything.



Disconnect the steering shaft (undo pinch bolt) and pull it off the splines. Then disconnect the hydraulic lines, I had to use a 5/8" stubby wrench. Also, dont forget to disconnect the joint at the pitman arm.



Then undo the 3 bolts that hold the gear in, the gear box is threaded, so no nuts to worry about here. Then pull the gear out. Here is old vs new.



Pull the pitman arm, youre going to need a BIG pitman arm puller, a heavy duty one like this is very slick.



Also get some new o rings for the hydraulic lines before hand. I forgot, and had a buddy run out and find me some that worked.



Then install the new gear and hook everything back up.



Now at this point, the system needs to be bled. Since I was changing fluid anyways, I switched to Mobil 1 Synthetic.



Remember that on a hydroboost setup, the PS pump runs fluid to both the hydroboost for the brakes and the steering gear. Disconnect the return line on the master cylinder as shown here, and using a 3/8" piece of vinyl tube connect to it, and run the other end into an empty container.



Now your going to need a buddy to bleed the system. Start the truck, and with the pump cap open, have your friend keep the reservoir full. Turn the the wheel lock to lock, and pump the brakes periodically. The system empties into the waste container, and new fluid pumped through. After 3 quarts worth has gone through, the system is flushed, and the fluid is now changed.

Steering has DRASTICALLY improved, probably a combination of both the new gear and the new fluid. Plus the synthetic fluid will be better for the pump come winter.

Peace.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
got my new clutch master/slave in the mail. The one in my truck is the original as far as I know, and has all sorts of slop. The pushrod eyelet is wore, and I cant keep clutch pedal-pushrod bushings in the dang things. So....new master/slave is going in this weekend probably, and instead of the stupid little plastic bushing, Im going to mod the pushrod with a small heim and bolt, for a bullet proof fix.

 

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WOW when can i bring my truck over !!!!! good work!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Here are some other random pictures of things. I got a new set of 315/75R16 BFG KM2's along the way as well (you may notice).

 
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