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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Passenger side bearing and seal on 2004 F250 4WD has given out and I need to get replaced. Upon searching parts, I've realized there are MANY different options out there...
I'm looking for advice from you grease monkeys that have likely replaced these things numerous times on what (economical+efficient) brand you trust to hold up without having to sell one of my organs, but I also don't prefer to be digging back in here in 6 months...
Thx in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I’ve been following your other thread, so I’ll ask again here, are you certain that you need to replace that, and not just the needle bearing?
Everything looks beat out from the outside in, but I haven't been inside yet..
I have to pick up a 1/2 impact wrench today, I can't even take my wheel off lol
 

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Everything looks beat out from the outside in, but I haven't been inside yet..
I have to pick up a 1/2 impact wrench today, I can't even take my wheel off lol
That might not even take it off. My experience has always been a long a** ratchet (that you don't care about) with a pipe on the end lol
 

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You need to jack that tire off the ground, and then put a long pipe, board, or prybar under it, and lift to see if there is any slop in the wheel/bearing itself. Then turn the wheel with the hub disengaged to see what kind of resistance/friction/hangups you have, and then do the same with the hub engaged (so the axle turns with it). If there is no slop when prying on the wheel with the lever, and there are no hangups while rotating the wheel with the hub engaged, it is likely that your hub unit bearing remains intact. If you only experience grinding and resistance while the locking hub is disengaged, that indicates a needle bearing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You need to jack that tire off the ground, and then put a long pipe, board, or prybar under it, and lift to see if there is any slop in the wheel/bearing itself. Then turn the wheel with the hub disengaged to see what kind of resistance/friction/hangups you have, and then do the same with the hub engaged (so the axle turns with it). If there is no slop when prying on the wheel with the lever, and there are no hangups while rotating the wheel with the hub engaged, it is likely that your hub unit bearing remains intact. If you only experience grinding and resistance while the locking hub is disengaged, that indicates a needle bearing.
what's hilarious is that I brought up the question of whether or not there is an independent bearing at the shop this morning (in this case, the needle bearing) and I was told you can't replace just that bearing on these setups...
I just followed your instructions and I don't have any play in the wheel itself. shaft engages and turns when hub is locked and disengages when unlocked (however there are brief moments where the u-joint will move a little and there are 'noises' when turning the wheel...I'm going to be pissed if it is in fact just the needle bearing itself lmao
also, what is the exact name of the seal needed? it's an 'outer' shaft seal right?
 

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No, it’s not the outer shaft seal… I think the outer shaft seal is that dust seal between the axle tube and the U joint. I would call this the knuckle vacuum seal, though that is probably not the official part name. It is an interference fit into the knuckle and onto the stub shaft. It helps centralize that stub shaft so that it does not prematurely wear out the needle bearings. The needle bearing part number is B - 2110. I have a National brand here in my toolbox, made in USA, and if recollection is correct I paid about $10 for it at NAPA.
 

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If you do not have the vacuum locking auto hubs still on the truck, and you must manually lock the hubs in order to get four-wheel-drive, I would just replace he needle bearing so long as the bearing race on the stub shaft looks serviceable. You can smooth it with emery cloth. If, however, you do have ESOF, and want it to work properly, you must replace the knuckle seal. Be aware that even if you do not have ESOF, or auto locking hubs, the knuckle seal, when intact, does keep road debris out of the internals, and help prolong the life of all the bearings.
 
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