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Cant block off the oil cooler return line - need that
Read my comment on pressure testing the DT466 again -- I find it hard to believe your engine is not building pressure in the heads (heater core supply)

Maybe it is a "path of least resistance" thing that is keeping flow out of the heater core - since both the heater supply and oil cooler return are plumbed into the return to the pump (under the degas bottle) - thats why I asked how the port on top of the front cover was treated after the intake was put on.

I would be teped to try to use the return on top of the front cover or barring that route -- add a port where the lower radiator hose connects - and route the oil cooler there
 
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Back up in post 23, Hydro got it right.

You've got several flow circuits.

  • The oil cooler
  • The heater circuit
  • The left engine bank
  • The right engine bank

This manifold modification alters the coolant flow; there is no longer as much of a restriction in the oil cooler circuit. However, the heater core is a flow restriction, more than 8' of heater circuit hose.

You could add a ball valve into the circuit from the oil cooler under the degas bottle and throttle the flow in that circuit. I'll show a ball valve setup I made for my heater circuit since I didn't have a vacuum valve, and I wanted to tie in my coolant filter.

The issue is balancing the flow as you don't want to denigrate the oil cooler function; you want it the same or maybe a little better than stock. The stock flow is restricted by the bends, the EGR cooler, and the pathway through the intake.

But boy, does this put a question in my mind. When doing this type of modification to one of the four circuits, improving the flow through the oil cooler, is the flow through the left and right banks of the engine compromised in any way? You would not necessarily see that in the coolant temperature. Overall flow through the radiator is the same.

Nickel Auto part Gas Metal Composite material
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Would be nice to have hands on a front cover to chase the coolant path -- I suspect the oil cooler flow is directly from the pump, so coolest water

Flow to the heater is from the passenger side head, and would bypass that flow back to the pump suction side -- not much flow considering the hose length, bends, and core restriction

Coolant flows pretty quickly around the system anyways, so the temps likely even out unless the engine is under high load
Bismic posted a flow chart for this pump - I think it was 70 GPM @ 60 psi @ 3500 rpm (need to look for the chart again)
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Hang on a second. Yall are helping tremendously and I'm super grateful for it....but I need to clarify that I have an EXTERNAL OIL COOLER, NO EGR COOLER, NO EGR VALVE.

Here is some more info from BPD...

Bulletproof Diesel Tech said to block off the bypass line. He didn't even understand why it is there. If you have a Stage 3 intake that does not tie into the front cover (The front cover port is plugged), and you have an EXTERNAL oil cooler, and there is no EGR cooler or EGR valve, then there is zero reason that line should be coming out of the transfer block at all. That transfer block's only purpose in life is to transfer coolant from the spot that used to hold the factory oil cooler to the EGR cooler....neither of which exist any more.

If I leave everything as is, then I could put a heater hoser shutoff valve in that bypass line and choke it down enough to make the heater circuit work.
 

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Ahh, ...guess I over looked the cooler being external -- yeah plug that line

Where does your external cooler connect?
 
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I didn’t realize that either. Plug it!!!!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 · (Edited)
Ahh, ...guess I over looked the cooler being external -- yeah plug that line

Where does your external cooler connect?
Ahh, ...guess I over looked the cooler being external -- yeah plug that line

Where does your external cooler connect?
OK. What do you mean? It's a bulletproof diesel external oil cooler. So, It has two giant hoses that go from the oil transfer block to the big oil cooler that sits behind the condenser. It runs through there and then back to the transfer block to go wherever oil goes. Its an air to oil cooler so no engine coolant is involved with it.
 

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There ya go, air cooled
there are some that still use coolant, but are externally mounted
I didnt know which one you had
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
Yeah. Well, I probably wasted a lot of money replacing the entire hose assembly with the heater hose valve on it, it was a real B&^%$ to get off with the QD. But, I guess at least now I don't have to worry about that one hose. LOL. Because of where the nipple is on that transfer block, I may not be able to get a plug into it due to stuff in the way, so I may have to put an inline valve in the bypass and shut it down that way for the time being.
 

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Never had any issue before. Anyway, I have a new Kill Devil engine in my truck. Truck runs OK but when its cold outside, the heater in the cab takes FOREVER to get hot. I mean....you have to have the engine at operating temps to get it to start getting warm. Once you drive and are on the road and going, the heater seems to work fine.

So, I have no EGR system, the intake is an ODAWG Stage 3 intake. The coolant has been rerouted from the back of my oil cooler base (its a BPD air to Oil cooler) to the heater hose under the degas bottle. I noticed the line from the oil cooler base being rerouted is kinked. Anyway, I am going to fix that but I don't think that has a thing to do with my heater issue.

One observation I had is that the hard tube coming off the front of the motor that ends up going to the plastic heater hose valve is ice cold while the motor is heating up. The engine gets to op temp fine, but that line is always cold. The other heater hose eventually gets hot, but this one stays cold or luke wamr most of the time.

Which line is supposed to be hot coolant coming into the heater core? None of this is making any sense to me so I'm lost. It seems to me that if i had no heat in the cab, then the tube coming off the front of the motor would be hot and the one coming out of the firewall to the degas would be cold. Mine is exactly opposite.
Hey There, sorry to hear about your heater woes and definitely not a good time of year for this to be happening. I have a 2004 F350 that’s had a bit of bullet proofing done but it experienced the same issue as you described prior to having this upgrade work done. Part of the work included a new thermostat and when I got my truck back I couldn’t believe how not only did the truck reach operating temperature more quickly but the cabin heater was working way better than it ever did and I bought the truck brand new. I think that my truck had a faulty thermostat from the get go because as I previously mentioned there was way more heat after having a new thermostat installed with all of the other work. This may not be your issue but thermostats are cheap and it might be worth your while to try a new one. Of course there are ways to test a thermostat once you have it out of the vehicle but in my opinion and experience it’s just cheaper and way less time consuming to just install a new one and go from there. food for thought I hope this helps, good luck.
 

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Yeah. Well, I probably wasted a lot of money replacing the entire hose assembly with the heater hose valve on it, it was a real B&^%$ to get off with the QD. But, I guess at least now I don't have to worry about that one hose. LOL. Because of where the nipple is on that transfer block, I may not be able to get a plug into it due to stuff in the way, so I may have to put an inline valve in the bypass and shut it down that way for the time being.
I've got a video if you ever decide to change out the heater core thinking there may be more garbage in it. It includes an easy way to get the connectors off.

 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
I've got a video if you ever decide to change out the heater core thinking there may be more garbage in it. It includes an easy way to get the connectors off.

So, I've replaced these quick disconnect hoses on my F150, and they were a real pain in the *** to get off, but it was mostly because there just isnt a lot of room to get adult sized hands. I never was able to use a 'disconnect tool' on any of these. On this replacement, I was able to get ONE ear to release with my finger, the other I had to use a long flat screwdriver to depress the ear and allow it to come off. My hands are all torn up. But, it was the hard one, so if I have to do the other one, it shouldn't be too bad.
 

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Hey There, sorry to hear about your heater woes and definitely not a good time of year for this to be happening. I have a 2004 F350 that’s had a bit of bullet proofing done but it experienced the same issue as you described prior to having this upgrade work done. Part of the work included a new thermostat and when I got my truck back I couldn’t believe how not only did the truck reach operating temperature more quickly but the cabin heater was working way better than it ever did and I bought the truck brand new. I think that my truck had a faulty thermostat from the get go because as I previously mentioned there was way more heat after having a new thermostat installed with all of the other work. This may not be your issue but thermostats are cheap and it might be worth your while to try a new one. Of course there are ways to test a thermostat once you have it out of the vehicle but in my opinion and experience it’s just cheaper and way less time consuming to just install a new one and go from there. food for thought I hope this helps, good luck.
Good advice but take it one step further and test the new thermostat before installation. I have had bad thermostats out of the box before. My '04 F250 had this heating issue after I did a delete. I fixed mine with Fia a radiator winter muff / bug screen.

https://www.autozone.com/front-end-...grille-screen-winter-bug/ford/f250-super-duty
 

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I have the same setup as you. You need to have the bypass line flowing coolant (since this is the only way your oil cooler can stay cool). The bypass line could possibly be reduced to a smaller size, but not closed off. It sounds like you need to try and do a few coolant flushes and then on the last flush, backflush the oil cooler and also change the heater core (or try and backflush the heater core). When I did mine, I changed the heater core, inlet and outlet hoses, and a heater control valve. Even after all that, I'm still needing to backflush periodically due to stuff coming loose inside the block.

Those hoses are a bit tricky to remove from the heater core, so be prepared to say a few swear words. Getting it out from inside the cab isn't too bad. Just the blend door actuator is the trickiest part but not terrible.

EDIT: I missed the part that you have the external oil cooler. That part I don't have so my apologies. Sounds like you have my dream setup there.
 
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