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Out of the metal pipe should run like a garden hose on full pressure
Pictures of your setup would be nice, since you have the rerouted lined for the oil cooler -- kinda wondering if that is the problem
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 · (Edited)
Out of the metal pipe should run like a garden hose on full pressure
Pictures of your setup would be nice, since you have the rerouted lined for the oil cooler -- kinda wondering if that is the problem

Here is what they do...




The coolant comes OUT of the oil cooler base thing, so I don't know how having that kinked right under the degas bottle could have any effect at all on the hot tube in the front. I don't have an oil cooler or an EGR valve since my intake is an Odawg with no provisions for any of it. I'm going to test tomorrow before complete reconnection and see what happens. I was poring over the Bible coolant section in hopes I could understand the circuit and hope this was the case, but I don't think it is and my circuit is a little different anyway.
 

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Where they Tee in is the heater return hose -- the pressure from the oil cooler added to the heater return flow, may cancel out some of the flow thru the heater core -- I am not convinced that is the best place to flow the oil cooler return.

Definitely any restriction post that Tee connection will slow the flow thru the heater and oil cooler -- and depending on the severity of the restriction, may cancel the flow thru the heater entirely.-- the oil cooler flow is right off the pump outlet -- the heater flow is off the return from the passenger side head -- it is possible that the pressure in the oil cooler is higher than the heater hose supply -- so the flow may run backwards thru the heater core
 

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I didn't realize that setup was on here. That's a possibility, restricted return. Other people who installed the design would be good to check with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Where they Tee in is the heater return hose -- the pressure from the oil cooler added to the heater return flow, may cancel out some of the flow thru the heater core -- I am not convinced that is the best place to flow the oil cooler return.

Definitely any restriction post that Tee connection will slow the flow thru the heater and oil cooler -- and depending on the severity of the restriction, may cancel the flow thru the heater entirely.-- the oil cooler flow is right off the pump outlet -- the heater flow is off the return from the passenger side head -- it is possible that the pressure in the oil cooler is higher than the heater hose supply -- so the flow may run backwards thru the heater core
by your logic, the kink I had in my oil cooler hose right there would have improved the heater performance if I understand correctly. I have to pay dealer prices for parts today since I need the truck tomorrow. To be clear the oil cooler hose is what is linked, not the heater return hose.

The nipple on the map sensor broke so that’s always fun. Regardless of what I find with the heater situation, I gotta button it up for a week of hard towing.
 

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The kink would improve over a non-kinked situation, but could still compromise to a stock setup ...... potentially. As said before, you need to see if others with this modification has the same condition to know if it’s the cause.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 · (Edited)
Guess that answers that question. 5 minutes of idling and that coolant is already warm. That’s the discharge out of the pipe. Pipe is warm too.
Wierd. Granted you can’t lift that hose too high or it stops but it is flowing there. There is not a lot of pressure coming off that pipe so I’d imagine any backflow would stop it’s movement. So, it’s absolutely possible that the tee in that line is providing that. I don’t have any point of reference.
 

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That seems really low to me

Kinda related - I put a gauge in the block drain of a IH-DT466 once just to see how much pressure and got about 70 psi at wide open throttle - 2450 on those tractors
The pump in the 6.0 is a similar build -- the 6.0 pump idles at about 900 rpm so I would speculate that the pressure may be in the 10+ range -- a centrifugal pump needs speed to bring up the head pressure

I'll bet @TooManyToys has a chart that gives the pumping curve on the 6.0 -- just poking at you Jack
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 · (Edited)
That seems really low to me

Kinda related - I put a gauge in the block drain of a IH-DT466 once just to see how much pressure and got about 70 psi at wide open throttle - 2450 on those tractors
The pump in the 6.0 is a similar build -- the 6.0 pump idles at about 900 rpm so I would speculate that the pressure may be in the 10+ range -- a centrifugal pump needs speed to bring up the head pressure

I'll bet @TooManyToys has a chart that gives the pumping curve on the 6.0 -- just poking at you Jack

I don't know. This was IDLING cold. It certainly didn't gush out and it took a couple of seconds for it to finally start trickling out and then it was ok, it had to fill 4' of 3/4" tubing to get what I am showing for testing. If you lifted it to above the firewall, it stopped completely. Who knows. Flow is low but not zero, the change of the coolant circuits may have done it, or maybe this motor has something different somewhere else that causes it. Either way, you don't need 70psi to run a heater. You just need hot coolant to flow through the core. I did not measure at the pipe because there is not an easy way to do it but I'd imagine it would be suitable there. The water pump is a BPD 100mm. Looks like I gotta live with it. I now know the pump works, the thermostat works, and coolant if moving through the circuit. Not much else to say here except...it is what it is I guess. I suppose it's entirely possible that with the EGR delete and change of oil cooler base and intake that the coolant just has easier routes to take back to the return line.
 

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To me also, that seems low from what I would expect, but I'm not in a position to test mine.

Not the right graph as it should be higher at the low end, with a curve as the pressure increases, and the only data I have. The 2003 pump output is noted in the 2003 Bible. But that's for the entire pump, not the heater bypass.

Rectangle Slope Font Parallel Plot
 
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Thanks @TooManyToys

I think I would be temped to pull that metal tube and inspect the port in the front cover for blockage -- Hmm, tho the head pressure should have way over the top of the hood, no matter if it only had a small hole in the front cover
 

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I was trying to get that across earlier in the thread, knowing someone had an issue with a new cover purchased through Dynamic Diesel.

I modified my cover in that area, not that I'm suggesting anyone do what I've done. But the galvanic corrosion between the aluminum cover and what I believe is COR-TEN steel tube is maddening to me that it was done. But there is a lot of flow potential there. Interestingly, the 2003 cover has a more open port than the 2004 cover with the 100mm pump.

But that port should be flowing coolant like crazy.

Not mine.

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That was only at the connection, Mark. Borescoping the interior of the block and heads were relatively free. I developed more oxidation by having the engine open over time.

From DTR and others, that connection point is a highly corrosive area, which I can only attribute to the difference in metals. People have talked about using an air hammer to get the pipe out of the cover.
 

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When that mod is done with the aftermarket manifold and re-route -- what is done with the port on top of the pump housing (where the large oring sits) ?
And isn't that port connected to the inlet of the pump?
 

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That was only at the connection, Mark. Borescoping the interior of the block and heads were relatively free. I developed more oxidation by having the engine open over time.

From DTR and others, that connection point is a highly corrosive area, which I can only attribute to the difference in metals. People have talked about using an air hammer to get the pipe out of the cover.
I removed that pipe in my engine not all that long ago. That is why I commented.
 

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That's interesting. My original engine had that type of corrosion at 125k, this one at 75k. The part is an -AB, so not really a change in maturing. The reman always had ELC in it; I gave it to the dealer when the engine was installed. I wonder if there is a difference between environmental exposure, the brine used on the roads here.

I think Youngblood had a video where it was stuck; someone else talked about bending the tab over at the alternator mount rather than trying to remove the pipe. I have a picture somewhere of the cover cracked trying to get the pipe out.

Why did you have to pull the pipe? Was the o-ring leaking?
 

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I think it was Anthony's video that made me wonder about it. No leak, just curiosity.

Edit - I don't know if it is related, but I NEVER have used the block heater.
 

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Yeah, I have used the heater. Maybe another or the factor.

After seeing that on my engines twice, it screwed with my head enough to take that drastic step. I thought about painting, powder coating; I even bought a Dorman pipe to see if the steel was the same.

I did have another reason, in case I ever install a full-flow coolant filter, I would do it from that port to the heater, rather than post-oil cooler as it's done in the kits. Then, instead of routing it up past the alternator, a hose can run under the alternator ledge heading to the inner fender. Putting the filter after debris gets filtered by the oil cooler does not make sense to me.

FYI, the Dorman pipe is thinner, and they did not align the mounting tab properly when they brazed it on, so the pipe would have been close to the belt in use.
 
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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
so I think I figured it out. I put a new valve in it and back flushed the heater core. Everything inside of there was literally a handful of grains of casting sand Probably from the previous motor. Anyway, I still don’t have any heat and in fact it got worse. That led me to realize that I unkinked that bypass line. So, I took my pinch off pliers and pinched it shut completely. Instantaneously, I had 195° heat coming out of that black tube. And I mean instantly. So, it seems that both of those lines come off the front cover and go to return. The problem is that the heater is basically a bypass. So even though this motor and pump will put out a lot of flow, it will not push it through a heater core which amounts to about 8 feet of three-quarter inch line when it can just push it through a short section of five eights back into the flow. So I guess, at this point, I need to know what the best option is here. I don’t know what happens if you just shut that line off completely.
Anyway, I guess what I’m saying is everything seems to be working just fine. It’s just at the replumb of the system has caused some imbalances.
 
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