Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,802 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What procedure do you guys use for bleeding?
What fluid you using?

I'm reading some stuff that talks about the ABS sensor? I think I have air in my rear lines because my front pads keep glazing over...

So here's my story. About a year ago I was getting vibration while braking so I took it into the tire shop to get it checked out. They said my front rotors were fine, font pads had like 20% life left, rear rotors were warped but pads were at 80%. So I had the rear rotors turned and went on my way as I wanted to just do the fronts myself and not pay them a ton of money for something I could do. Brakes did feel different after I left. Like they were possibly "softer" but stopped fine. Went home ordered up some EBC slotted and dimpled front rotors with green stuff pads. Changed out my front rotors and pads. The rotors were a PAIN to get off! Anyways... 3-4 months later I started getting a squeal at like 5mph or slower... Pulled he pads off and they were glazed over so I sanded them down put it all back together and it was fine again but again 3 months later they were glazed... Sanded them down again and now they are doing it again.... So I've been brain storming and I'm thinking my rears have air in the lines... If I pump up the brakes it seems to stop quicker than if I don't pump them. Also if I just come to a complete stop and apply the E-brake 99% of the time it just goes to the floor. Now if I come to a stop and pump up my brakes the E-brake is a lot stiffer and I can't get it probably half way.

So what I'm wondering is if the brake shop did something when they did the work on the rear or did I get air in the system while pushing the front pucks in for the new pads? Or?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,635 Posts
Start at the back, work forward. Have a helper or get the kit to do it yourself. Make sure you have more fluid than you think. Better to return a bottle of brake fluid than run air into the system. Crack the lines, bleed the fluid at the farthest point, go to the next point, make sure there is plenty of fluid in the brake reservoir every time you got to the next caliper.

I replaced and purged the brake lines awhile back finding a significant change in pedal firmness when done.

Use whatever fluid meets the spec as listed in the owner's manual.
 

·
RIP Mitch ! We miss you
Joined
·
11,966 Posts
Very few people in my experience do this but it is a good idea to flush the brake system annually as part of your annual maintenance. Brake fluid attracts moisture and water in your lines leads to corrosion of your brake parts and a spongy pedal.

That said air in the rear lines wouldn't cause glazing in the front pads. I would suspect that your pins are not sliding freely causing the pads to remain in light contact with the rotors after pressing the brakes. Either that or for some reason you have residual pressure in the front lines again keeping the pads in contact with the rotors, but I think this less likely. This doesn't mean you may not have air in the lines but if you do it is not the reason your front pads are glazing over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,802 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I was almost thinking the same thing on the pins but all 4 pads are glazed.... I'll check it out when go to pull the pads. Either way I'm going to bleed all the lines because the truck has almost 100k on it and I'm sure it's never been done.


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

·
RIP Mitch ! We miss you
Joined
·
11,966 Posts
Again if it is still the original brake fluid it will have accumulated moisture over time and could have caused some corrosion within the cylinders not allowing the pistons to retract when the brake pedal is released. If your pins are ok and the calipers move freely this would be my next point of inspection.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,670 Posts
Again if it is still the original brake fluid it will have accumulated moisture over time and could have caused some corrosion withing the cylinders not allowing the pistons to retract when the brake pedal is released. If your pins are ok and the calipers move freely this would be my next point of inspection.
Mitch, if there's corrosion in the cylinders.....then what?
 

·
RIP Mitch ! We miss you
Joined
·
11,966 Posts
They make caliper rebuild kits which are basically new rubber parts. New boots and o-rings. Hone the caliper bore with a 3 stone hone and clean up the piston with steel wool or 1000 grit sandpaper, lubricate everything with brake fluid and put it back together. That's kind of an old school fix. Today people tend to just replace parts which is also an option. When I was a kid just learning this stuff we used to rebuild the wheel cylinders in drum brakes this same way and they were a lot cheaper to replace than disc brake calipers.

Of course if the corrosion is really bad you replace the calipers.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top