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Hey guys, I've always loved diesel trucks since I was a little kid and now that I can drive I am seriously looking at buying one. I am currently in a 2000 F-150 with the 5.4 Triton. Its a great reliable truck and I like it a lot, but my dream has always been an 04 6.0 F250. Talked to my dad about it and he said he would help me find one when I graduate if I got good grades and got a job. So here I am with a job and trying my hardest in school. I think I've found the truck, one of my family members is selling his red 04 CCSB 6.0. The truck has 150 thousand miles on the odometer, fully bulletproofed and deleted with a 5-inch exhaust (I would attach a video but forum post count isn't high enough so I will when I get enough posts.) We painted the truck ourselves (owning a body shop has its perks :D). He has copies of all the work receipts from a shop we know, although I have yet to look at them myself. I am currently a Junior in High School but am looking to get the truck spring break of next year, they are asking 12 grand for it.

As the official source for powerstroke info, I wanted to ask you guys if there is anything I should be expecting when I buy one of these trucks. I've heard some nightmare stories about them but those were mostly ones that hadn't been bulletproofed, deleted, and tuned like this one. I'm sure it will still have a few issues here and there at some point but I am trying my hardest to work and save my money for the truck. I would really love some personal experience from y'all and any advice you may have, thanks!
 

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Fan-fugging-tastic intro sir... well done.
@LoxDiesel drop some knowledge on the young man.
 

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Thank you sir I appreciate it. Just FYI I'm not lifting it and putting goofy wheels on it, I'm a simple man I don't need a pimped out truck :D Just want to keep the factory wheels and drive it down the road every day. If I did any suspension change it would be a leveling kit on 35" BF Goodrich mud tires or all terrains.
 

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The 04 is a transition year. Early ones have a different high-pressure oil system than the later ones. Find out (and let us know) which one it is.

The early 04's actually have an 03 engine and the ICP sensor is behind the turbo. The later 04's have the ICP on the passenger valve cover.

Also find out what coolant it has in it and BEFORE buying it, get a monitoring device of some sort. Phone apps are the best way to go for the new buyer - at least IMO.

ForScan and Torque Pro are the two most common monitoring apps for smart phones/tablets. The Apps are cheap ($5-$10). You will need an ELM327 device also. WiFi for Apple products and Bluetooth for Android.

When you get the monitoring, drive the truck and get the engine fully warmed up (ie when coolant and oil temperatures stabilize it is fully warmed up). Check how much hotter the oil is than the coolant. Normally the oil should be 4-10 degrees ABOVE the coolant temps. If it is 15 degrees hotter or above, then the oil cooler is plugged and will need work. An oil cooler job (doing it yourself) can be around $400-$500 IIRC.

Also, plan on adding on a fuel pressure sensor and gauge. This can be as much as $200. Low fuel pressure can ruin injectors and that is expensive. It doesn't happen instantly, so if you are watching the pressure, you can prevent the early failure.
 

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Very good advice. I did think about getting an engine monitoring system for the truck as well as the additional gauges. I like to be able to see what everything is doing when I am driving. I'll probably get one of those pillar gauge clusters for the truck. Would an Edge monitoring system be a good choice? I've seen people use them before.
 

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The Edge products can be expensive, but you want something that can pull engine data from the PCM instead of having only 4 or 5 manual gauges, and the Edge CTS2 will do the job. That monitor will be $450 or more. A phone app and the adapter is cheap. Again - I would go that route first so you can cheaply check out the truck before buying. You may very well need the money for an oil cooler replacement.

Since the 6.0L engines were never equipped with a fuel pressure sensor, that information is not available from the PCM and needs to be obtained separately. Lots of threads on this. You need an adapter, a sensor, wiring tied into a keyed power source, and a gauge. Some people also install a fuel hose w/ a 45* fitting onto the adapter so that the sensor can be installed at the end of the hose in a more accessible location (note - this is somewhat involved and should be done after the purchase).

To check out a used 6.0L truck, I also like to add a tee in the vent hose from the radiator to the degas bottle. Run a long hose out from under the hood and add a pressure gauge to it. Secure it somewhere where you can see it. Get the engine up to temperature again and record the degas bottle pressure. Then carefully (with a thick towel) open the degas cap and vent the pressure. The engine can still be running (or not). Put the cap back on securely and drive it some more. See what the degas pressure goes up to. Include a few WOT runs to see if high engine load spikes the pressure. If it does, it is probably due to leaking head gaskets.

I know you said it was bulletproofed, but that doesn't necessarily guarantee that head gaskets won't ever leak.

Were head studs installed in the previous bulletproofing?
 

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Lots of good info here. Like I said, I haven't yet had a chance to look at the work receipts but will definitely ask for copies of them when given the opportunity. As for all that process you just detailed, very interesting stuff but I'm by no means a mechanic and don't feel brave enough to do that, lol! You're probably right about the sensor application on the phone, the money could be used for any necessary maintenance and modifications if the need arises, so I will verify the integrity of the truck before making any purchases.
 

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These trucks are expensive to operate. Nice to see that you're working hard enough to run it. I truly mean that. I've been places where most people's first job was after they graduated college. With you working now, gives me hope in our nations future. Nice to have hope.
 

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Yes sir thank you much. I do realize they are commercial vehicles designed to make profit for a business and not really to be driven by a young kid who likes the sound of them. Trying to make my way in the world to save money and work hard to support my truck addiction :D
 

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As for all that process you just detailed, very interesting stuff but I'm by no means a mechanic and don't feel brave enough to do that, lol!
You either need to learn to work on these yourself, or have deep pockets when something happens.
We'll all help with the info, but you're the one that's gonna have to turn the wrenches. Don't be afraid, we'll walk you thru any problems step by step
 

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Thank you sir I appreciate the assistance. I would prefer to take it to a mechanic for a lot of things but as I go I will learn to fix simple stuff and do regular maintenance on my own. The support and expertise here really is outstanding, you all are a very knowledgeable group!
 

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The advice on doing many repairs on your own is given for several reasons:

1. the internet has most of the simple jobs well documented - many with pictures to make it even easier.
2. this forum and a few others have exceptional resources for troubleshooting and repair
3. some shops aren't all that knowledgeable or talented on the 6.0L (so you can get poor service or cheap parts)
4. some shops are marginally dishonest and some are extremely so. With the 6.0L reputation, they take advantage of you and do more work than is required.
5. Diesel mechanic labor is expensive

As far as having head studs or not, you can look to see if studs are present or if bolts are present (looking at the receipts isn't the only option). That said, sometimes "where the head studs were done" and "which machine shop did the heads" is as important as having the work done (importance of quality work).

So many videos are available with simple searches also!

If you can paint a truck, you can do the basic things suggested here. I wish I were talented enough to paint my truck!!
 

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Hah! I didn't paint the truck myself but we have own a collision repair shop (Autocolor of Wilmington) so we do painting as part of the work. Also yes it is difficult to trust many shops, especially with the 6.0. I know ARP Head studs are a popular option and from what I hear, a solid product. I think the owner said the truck was studded but he didn't mention the brand so yeah I will check to see beforehand.
 

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I do have another question... I assume these vehicles are a little more maintenance-intensive than my 5.4, so do I have to do more than just change the oil on time? Also are there any recommendations for coolant/filters/oil and any other preventative maintenance products I should be looking at?
 

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Filters - best to use Motorcraft or International or Racor (Racor is the manufacturer of the OEM oil and fuel filters).
Cheapest place to find OEM filters is DieselFiltersOnLine.com

The cheapest place to buy OEM parts that I have found is AutoNation White Bear Lake (Mn). I hear Sunrise Ford in California is a great place also. Sign up online and get great prices. They sell filters and fluids at great prices also. You just need to make sure you add in the shipping costs, they can be high sometimes (especially w/ fluids). I order filters in bulk for me and friends. Very cost effective.

Great service also. Mike @fordsvtparts works for them and is always helping us out!
https://parts.autonationfordwhitebearlake.com/

It is well worth it to use a synthetic oil. IMO a 5W40 works best, but lots of people like 10W30. Since your injectors are actuated with high pressure engine oil, the injectors tend to "stick" more often with 15W40 than with the 5W40 or 10W30. Ford calls this sticking problem "stiction". Lots of threads on it.

Oil changes - every 5K miles. You can probably get away w/ 7.5K miles w/ synthetic oil.
Fuel filter changes (both of them) - every 10k miles. You can probably get away w/ 15K miles, but the injectors don't like low pressure or being starved for fuel. Best to be conservative here IMO!!! Also - did I mention to get a fuel pressure gauge, lol!

Transmission fluid - use Mercon SP or Mercon LV only.

Transmission fluid - flush or "drain and re-fill" - every 30K miles. You need to look up the proper way to flush it or you won't get the old fluid out. If you don't want to flush it, then you can do a series of 3 or 4 drain and re-fills. Just drive it 15-20 miles after each refill and before the next drain to mix it all up. This is what I do and I have 206K miles on it and going strong.

Change the external transmission filter every 30K miles, no need to change the internal filter.

I change the differential fluids every 60K miles and the same for the transfer case fluid.

USE OEM for the air filter and change it when the "filter-minder" shows that you need to. You can go a long way on that filter. Up to 100K miles if the driving environment isn't very dirty.

Make sure that your oil filter cap is an OEM cap. Take a pic of it from the side and we can tell. If the cap height is over apprx 1", then it is an aftermarket cap and needs to be changed.

I flush my Brake fluid every 3 yrs also - it absorbs moisture.

I also installed a power steering fluid filter.

Also - make sure the coolant is an EC-1 rated ELC coolant. They can withstand the engine heat better (and do a few other things better also). With an Extended Life Coolant, you can go well over 100K miles between fluid changes.

The thing about coolant is that you should FIRST find out if your oil cooler is plugged (on the coolant side) before changing this fluid out. If it is plugged, you have to decide how you are going to address the cooler and how you are going to flush out the old coolant and the crud in the system. Chemical cleaning is an option, but many people have caused the plugging to be worse with harsh chemicals and they have had to install MULTIPLE new oil coolers. The cooling system holds 7 gallons, but you can only drain out about half of that and there are a lot or "low places" where solids and contaminants can hide.

You need to read up on coolant flushes and plugged oil coolers before you start in on the coolant maintenance. In an earlier post I mentioned looking at coolant and oil temperatures ..... it is to get information so that you can properly assess and address your coolant system and/or your oil cooler.
 
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