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Ok this forum convinced me to walk away from a 6.4. Now we are on the hunt for a 6.7! We found one with 110000 miles a 2014.

Is this a safe truck to look into?

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I would look to see if the truck is deleted or stock, and secondly is there any maintenance records on it. I don't recall any issues, but the 15 and 16 models has a better turbo. Just saying. Good luck.
 
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Yes it's safe to look into, but you haven't said anything about it to give any advice. Post a link to the ad. Everyone who owns a 6.7 expects their truck to go 110k miles and keep going with no problems.
 

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Yes it's safe to look into, but you haven't said anything about it to give any advice. Post a link to the ad. Everyone who owns a 6.7 expects their truck to go 110k miles and keep going with no problems.
That truck has been sold (they forgot to remove ad) so I am back to searching. But after reading about the 6.7 vs the 6.4 I feel like we can narrow our search to one engine. I'll post the link to the next potential :)

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I just trade my 2010 6.4 with 137000 miles never a problem . just started to rust .. n.e ohio , got a 2013 with the 6.7 and love it with 95000 on it .I got the ESP with it for 3 years /
 

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Glad to hear you decided on the 6.7. I own a small used diesel dealership, and we do not buy or sell the 6.4. I love the way the 6.4 drives, and I love the power it has. I think they look great and perform well, but the reliability of them is a major major concern. We sell tons of 6.7s and you are definitely making the right decision.

In terms of mileage, something with 100k or more is no concern. We see them come through with well over 200k and no major issues at all. For diesel trucks, mileage is not the concern - it's maintenance. I would take a truck with high miles, low idle hours, and maintenance records over a truck with half the mileage and thin records.

Typically interior wear is a sign of how the truck was maintained mechanically. If the truck has lower miles but looks beat, it was most likely used pretty hard and not taken care of well. I would not focus on mileage and focus on records, and cleanliness.

Let me know if you have any more specific questions!
 

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Glad to hear you decided on the 6.7. I own a small used diesel dealership, and we do not buy or sell the 6.4. I love the way the 6.4 drives, and I love the power it has. I think they look great and perform well, but the reliability of them is a major major concern. We sell tons of 6.7s and you are definitely making the right decision.

In terms of mileage, something with 100k or more is no concern. We see them come through with well over 200k and no major issues at all. For diesel trucks, mileage is not the concern - it's maintenance. I would take a truck with high miles, low idle hours, and maintenance records over a truck with half the mileage and thin records.

Typically interior wear is a sign of how the truck was maintained mechanically. If the truck has lower miles but looks beat, it was most likely used pretty hard and not taken care of well. I would not focus on mileage and focus on records, and cleanliness.

Let me know if you have any more specific questions!
I concur, if time is available sending off for an oil analysis is a great way to check on any internal issues. I am a big proponent for 2015 or > for the following reasons. More power and torque, improved fuel system (HPFP and injectors), turbo is larger 72.5mm vs 64mm with improved durability, Improved down pipe, Improved exhaust manifold and valve train, improved crankshaft and bearings and improved dampener.
 

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Can anyone tell me what the downside of high idle hours is? Recently purchased a 6.7 with an alarmingly high ratio of idle to engine hours, more than I’d like to admit and am starting to worry if I made the wrong purchase.
 

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Can anyone tell me what the downside of high idle hours is? Recently purchased a 6.7 with an alarmingly high ratio of idle to engine hours, more than I’d like to admit and am starting to worry if I made the wrong purchase.

Todays diesel engines are not like the old school diesel engines. On the 6.7, you have an EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculator) as well as your DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) {The big *** exhaust thing under your truck} just collecting soot while idling. Since the exhaust gasses are recirculated back into your engine on the EGR, that soot is now getting into your oil - hence why your used oil is so black. Those soot particles are floating around exactly where you don't want them - on parts that need to be lubricated and not have any solids. And what does escape, is just chillaxin in your DPF until your next regen cycle. At an idle, you aren't creating enough heat to burn off the soot like with the regen. You typically need to have the exhaust gasses near 1200 DegF and be moving at highway speeds during your regen to get a good clean burn of your soot. Too many times of not getting a good regen, can start to cause a failure to your EGT (Exhaust Gas Temperature) sensors and up to clogging your DPF, which is a pretty penny to replace.

I am sure there are better explanations, but that's my understanding of it....And also why alot of folks choose to delete their emission systems once the warranty goes out.
 

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Todays diesel engines are not like the old school diesel engines. On the 6.7, you have an EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculator) as well as your DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) {The big *** exhaust thing under your truck} just collecting soot while idling. Since the exhaust gasses are recirculated back into your engine on the EGR, that soot is now getting into your oil - hence why your used oil is so black. Those soot particles are floating around exactly where you don't want them - on parts that need to be lubricated and not have any solids. And what does escape, is just chillaxin in your DPF until your next regen cycle. At an idle, you aren't creating enough heat to burn off the soot like with the regen. You typically need to have the exhaust gasses near 1200 DegF and be moving at highway speeds during your regen to get a good clean burn of your soot. Too many times of not getting a good regen, can start to cause a failure to your EGT (Exhaust Gas Temperature) sensors and up to clogging your DPF, which is a pretty penny to replace.

I am sure there are better explanations, but that's my understanding of it....And also why alot of folks choose to delete their emission systems once the warranty goes out.
Fantastic answer.

If you're familiar with the 6.0's, the people who drove them "like they stole them" typically saw less problems with them. Diesel engines in general are made to be USED, but especially with all the high tech emissions equipment on them, that is even more true now.

I had a customer buy a 350 and use it for short commutes, 5 mins to and from work. Didn't pay attention to the "drive to clean exhaust filters" message. We did multiple forced regens on it and it was spewing the nastiest stuff you've ever seen. That is the stuff that is recirculating in your engine and hanging out in your dpf. Don't know the legitimate science behind it all but I can't imagine that's good for internal engine components.

You got one with high idle hours, okay not ideal but also don't worry too much about it. If the truck is nice and seems well taken care of otherwise, don't lose sleep over it. Continue to follow the maintenance schedule and don't use the truck for short little commutes, that's not what it is made to do. Even though some things are preferred (like lower idle hours) these 6.7s are robust engines. Just enjoy your truck!
 

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I have a 07f350 dually with 507k miles all stock same motor never been tuned or opened up. Stock head bolts etc. I am buyer an 2011 with 290k miles tomorrow without thinking twice has it been well maintained. Not deleted yet but ill do tht first thing
 

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Can anyone tell me what the downside of high idle hours is? Recently purchased a 6.7 with an alarmingly high ratio of idle to engine hours, more than I’d like to admit and am starting to worry if I made the wrong purchase.
If your losing sleep get an oasis report on the engine oil. Its like $80 ish bucks. That should tell you if there is excessive wear or a problem may be looming.
 

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As so well described by maynianj the issue is about the emissions system. Also its about the wear on internal components that are not reflected in the mileage which is the typical indicator of engine longevity. I get ambulances that only have 50,000 miles on them but will have 12500 hrs idle time. If you think about it, that's 650,000 miles if you were averaging 50 MPH.
 

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One engine hour equals 25 miles driven. So multiply (hours x 25) and you have the relative engine wear figure in miles. [e.g. 8,000 engine hours = 200,000 miles equivalent wear] Idle hours are harder on the engine for multiple reasons.

Also, an OASIS report is just the list of (warranty) work done by the dealers. You need a UOA (Used Oil Analysis) from someone like Blackstone Labs to see wear metals, fuel or coolant in the oil to look for trouble.
 

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I have a 2014 that I have tracked the mileage on pretty darn good, it's got over 110K and 64% of that is pure highway miles, I'd like to say they were all doing 60 plus mph but on the roads from Texas to KY, NC, OH, and NY that would be a lie. I sat on I440 for over an hour just waiting for something to clear up miles ahead of me, never did get what happened. Anyway, 31% would be what I call in and around miles, less than an hour drive one way, and around town stuff. The rest is idle time, sitting in rest areas has been the majority of that idle time, unless the trucks logs stop lights as idle time? Not sure, maybe someone can answer that for me. That leaves 5% for idle time, another "not sure" if that's considered high for a 6.7 that has that many road miles. I've also tracked my towing miles pretty close too as it was just something left over from my last truck log. 14.2K towing anything from a light 12 foot trailer with a mower on it to a 30 ft tandem dual with my John Deere tractor on it. (It tows a heavy load much better than a light load)
 

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Also, an OASIS report is just the list of (warranty) work done by the dealers. You need a UOA (Used Oil Analysis) from someone like Blackstone Labs to see wear metals, fuel or coolant in the oil to look for trouble.
I have no idea why I said oasis. Uoa/ oil analysis is what I ment.
Thanks for the catch!
 

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I am looking at a 2011 6.7 that has been deleted. looks mint, but now i see all of the issues about the Turbo, and has me thinking " maybe not"
 

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So I have read everyone's response. I am new to all this myself. I have one question though, is idle hours included in total engine hours, or is it totally separate? Thanks
 
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