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I thought that it’d be a good idea to save myself $1200 and replace my oil cooler myself. I got it apart and put the new cooler in and decided that this was a job for an actual mechanic. Local shop picked up my truck and the extra parts and I had them finish the install. They said I had everything taken apart well other than I pinched the injector harness in the intake manifold, so I had them replace the harness. When they got it back together they told me that the truck ran like garbage and it did. They told me that I might have sucked an o ring into the head when I did the blue spring or a bolt into the cylinder. The 3 cylinders that arnt firing only had 200psi of compression, I believe that it’s numbers 3,5 and 7. After the compression test the shop told me to give up on the truck and sell it for whatever I can get for it because they said that it needs a motor. I refuse to believe that I could’ve messed up the motor doing an oil cooler but I don’t know what else to do. Can’t afford to have someone tear it apart to find out that it needs a motor. At this point I’m just gonna drive a beater for a year and get a loan to buy a new longblock, turbo, injectors, meth kit and other goodies. Has anyone else had a similar problem after replacing the oil cooler or blue spring? Seems like it could be a valve-train issue or something else small but the shop I have it at insists that I need to sell it and it’s not worth fixing.
 

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Something is off. 3 cylinders with low compression? I would definitely have another shop verify the compression and do a camera inspection if possible. My guess is they screwed something up with the ficm or harness and can't figure it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
At first they said it didn’t start at all, then I had them buy a new injector harness to replace the one that I pinched and now all of the injectors pass a buzz test. They are very knowledgeable on 6.0s so I feel very confident that they have it together correctly but who knows.
 

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At first they said it didn’t start at all, then I had them buy a new injector harness to replace the one that I pinched and now all of the injectors pass a buzz test. They are very knowledgeable on 6.0s so I feel very confident that they have it together correctly but who knows.
Did you try to start it with the damaged harness?
 

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Link to his original thread:
 

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Not only are their DIY'ers, but dealership mechanics have dropped nuts, screws, bolts, and whatever down the open intake ports of the heads. So it's a very good reason to first clean the top of the motor before removing the intake manifold, including with compressed air, inspecting around the manifold runners for loose objects, and then plugging every intake port or taping it over.

While most situations like that only totally screws up one cylinder, the potential is there for all 8. The farm-boy quick trick is to pull the starter connector on the passenger fender well and jump to the positive battery post, listening to the cadence of the engine rotating over. The disparity of speed/force is a good indicator of a loss of compression. The best method is an accurate compression gauge.

A really bad blown head gasket can do this too. Cylinders 3, 5, and 7 - all in a row.


 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Did you try to start it with the damaged harness?
After I couldn’t get the turbo back on it went to a shop, they started it with the wires pinched and then I had the harness replaced. I think the shop threw in 3 different injectors after that happened. Injectors pass a buzz test and the ficm is good.

I think that the head gasket on it is starting to fail but the truck ran very well other than the overheating issue before the oil cooler. I’m starting to think I dropped a bolt or something in a cylinder and it went around and messed up 3 cylinders. Seems very weird to me as I am 99.9% sure that I didn’t but it’s starting to look like the only thing I could’ve done. I’m gonna save up a while and probably get a kdd reman longblock with a stage 3 cam.
 

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I'd be pulling the head on the passenger side and evaluating the situation before dumping that kind of coin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'd be pulling the head on the passenger side and evaluating the situation before dumping that kind of coin.
Think it’s worth paying the money for someone to pull the head when it’s got low compression? I can’t afford to put much more money into this thing as I’m a college student.
 

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Diesel repairs are expensive. A diesel was probably not a good choice for you.
 

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Being a college student, and I am just making an assumption here so pardon me if I am incorrect in this assumption, please don't take out a loan on top of whatever student loans you may have to "fix" an almost 20 year old or at best like 15 year old truck. That is an absolutely terrible financial decision. If you can't afford to or don't have the abilities to take the heads off and at least see if something smoked those pistons then the shop may be right in telling you to sell it.
 
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I’m a college student.
If you get this thing fixed, these are still super expensive to run.

I'd reccomend selling it for what you can. On principle, I would avoid selling it to the shop that said its bad. I think the shop may have done some shenanigans, but that will never be proved. Even without any problems at all with the truck, I think you need to get rid of it.
 

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How about doing this first when you have it. Run the engine cranking test using the starter cable I mentioned, record a video of how it sounds and post it here for all of us to hear. Many of us could tell if those cylinders do have a lower compression.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
i have a video of the shop doing a compression test but it won’t let me post it on here.
 

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i have a video of the shop doing a compression test but it won’t let me post it on here.
Post to youtube, then post the link here
 

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Should be using the jumper wire to crank the engine -- not the key

I hear a little variation in the engine rotation, but not that bad

Remove the valve covers and check the operation of the valve train before anything else -- also I would hook shop air the the tester hose he is using an see if the air escapes in the crankcase or in the intake or exhaust -- just a quick test for where the compression is going

You should have 390 - 420 psi depending on the gauge and port adapter -- the positioning of the check valve in the tester makes quite a difference in the pressures
Past all of that, the engine will run minus 3 cylinders -- good enough to tell if there are other problems that need attention

Pulling the intake and running a scope in the ports would be a good thing as well -- I have found all kinds of stuff in there, when one of my guys said they "cleaned it real good".
 

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My brother in law paid a very well known shop a few months back to replace his oil cooler and they dropped something down in one of the cylinders, roached the head and piston. At least it was on their dime.

I still want to see a video of it cranking from the under hood jumper for a good 10 seconds to see if we have clear cylinder misses.


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