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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking at buying 2006 f350 6.0 from my dad's work. It's been sitting for 2 years due to a blown turbo. What I'm worried about is the cold side of the turbo is completely shredded (I'll attach pictures below). So my my question are is there any way possible for pieces of the turbo to get to the turbo or would the intercooler catch all of the pieces. Also what would cause this failure? Is it just as simple as replacement of the turbo and I'm good or could there be more damage. Thanks
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Holy ****. Looks like someone dropped the turbo or something.

Pull off the intake elbow on the intake manifold, and look more metal debris or any obvious signs of damage. i can't help much on the intercooler side of things, never looked on the inside of one.
 

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I don't see how metal could have avoided getting sucked into the engine.
 

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I agree - it would be small metal pieces, but it doesn't take large metal pieces to be a big problem.
 

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I agree with the potential of fine particles getting past the CAC and dumped through the oil bath if the back wall of the intake side was compromised.

Interesting that happened. Almost like an object got into the filter side of the turbo, and took out a blade.
 

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Perhaps the problem was on the exhaust side. This was once the turbo from a Mercedes Sprinter V6 (engine type OM642 3L V6).
The exhaust manifolds of these engines are made of sheet metal and dissolve on the inside. The detached parts get into the turbo and destroy it.



















 

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I certainly don't want to claim any negative things here. But if you want to be 100% sure that there are no small particles in the oil system, the engine must be disassembled and the oil galleries cleaned.














Most shops just drain the oil and inspect it for foreign objects. If I were you, I would disassemble the turbo and check to what extent the turbo is destroyed and whether there are any small parts in the oil return. Perhaps only the front part of the turbo is affected and no debris has entered the return line.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I certainly don't want to claim any negative things here. But if you want to be 100% sure that there are no small particles in the oil system, the engine must be disassembled and the oil galleries cleaned.














Most shops just drain the oil and inspect it for foreign objects. If I were you, I would disassemble the turbo and check to what extent the turbo is destroyed and whether there are any small parts in the oil return. Perhaps only the front part of the turbo is affected and no debris has entered the return line.
I certainly don't want to claim any negative things here. But if you want to be 100% sure that there are no small particles in the oil system, the engine must be disassembled and the oil galleries cleaned.














Most shops just drain the oil and inspect it for foreign objects. If I were you, I would disassemble the turbo and check to what extent the turbo is destroyed and whether there are any small parts in the oil return. Perhaps only the front part of the turbo is affected and no debris has entered the return line.
Okay, thanks for your response. At this point I might be buying the truck for only $1,500 so I think that's worth putting an engine in if it needs it.
 

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The turbo return tube would show evidence of metal, if any went that path -- but I highly doubt any went down the oil return -- most of the turbo parts will be in the intercooler, that would need to be replaced
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The turbo return tube would show evidence of metal, if any went that path -- but I highly doubt any went down the oil return -- most of the turbo parts will be in the intercooler, that would need to be replaced
Okay, ya I was planning on replacing the intercooler, boots, and clamps when I did the turbo.
 

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Worth a try I guess. I would also recommend catching an oil sample after driving it 50-100 miles, and sending it in for analysis. Install a fumoto valve on the oil drain to make it easy to catch a sample between oil changes.

Since so much oil is retained in the system (3 qts or so), it would be wise to change the oil and filter again after a few hundred miles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Worth a try I guess. I would also recommend catching an oil sample after driving it 50-100 miles, and sending it in for analysis. Install a fumoto valve on the oil drain to make it easy to catch a sample between oil changes.

Since so much oil is retained in the system (3 qts or so), it would be wise to change the oil and filter again after a few hundred miles.
Should I also replace the oil cooler?
 

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With the unknown problems of this truck, I would block the turbo oil feed line and see if the engine will even start -- who knows what other problems there may be -- I would not spend money on a turbo until the engine is verified good

Running with the turbo removed and the oil line blocked will not "hurt" anything
 
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