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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2000 7.3l powerstroke with about 290,000 that has problems starting in any weather temperature. It can be 90 degrees outside and you will still have to plug in the truck for it to want start. The glow plugs and relay have both been recently replaced. I am just wondering if anyone can help me with this issue I am having. I am thinking the hpop or injectors or even both will need replaced. If anyone has any advice or solutions I will be glad to hear them. Thanks
 

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With nearly 300.000 miles, I'd lean toward the injectors first, especially if they're original. Does it start at all cold? If it does, does it misfire and start to run better as it warms up? That would definitely point to injectors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
yes it starts cold when its plugged in but if not then you have to use some either to get to fire. But once its warm then it runs fine with no misfires or dying out when driven. I want to lean towards the injectors or the hpop but want to know for sure
 

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You can check for the most common type of injector wear, lower poppet seat wear, with an injector buzz test. When running a buzz test to check for poppet seat wear, the sound of the injectors buzzing is the factor rather than any codes.

If you don't have a way to run a buzz test, you can check the armature plate to poppet body clearance with feeler gauges. This involves removing the valve covers, removing the solenoid and solenoid spacer from each injector. A new injector has a clearance of about 0.004". Through normal operation over time, the lower poppet seat wears and as a result, the clearance decreases. When the clearance gets down to about 0.0015", it's common for the injector to malfunction when cold. The cause is the suction created by the oil that's trapped between the armature plate and the poppet body. When it's cold, the suction prevents the armature plate from lifting to open the poppet valve. As the trapped oil warms and its viscosity lowers, it's easier for the solenoid to overcome the suction and the injector starts to operate normally.

Here's a buzz test video. Pay attention to the buzzing of injector #6 versus the rest of them.

 
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