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Hi, first post here. Hoping it’s in the right place.
I recently bought a 1996 F250 Powerstroke. I’ve been having some starting issues after the first week of owning, initially the starter wouldn’t crank, so I replaced the starter unit as it still had the original with 370,000km on it.
This seems to solve the cranking issue but I found that I had to cycle the glow plugs 5-6 times before starting which was no biggie. When I had the time I was going to look into the glow plugs and relay. This worked fine for 2 weeks until last night I turned the key and got the check engine light with no crank or even solenoid engagement. Relay 2 in the power distribution board is chattering as long as the key is in the ‘run’ position. I switched the relay out to no effect, also checked fuses 20+22 which are both fine.
Not 100% sure on where to go from there, this is my first old ford. Any ideas?
TIA
 

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Welcome! Normally when that relay starts "chattering", it's a low voltage issue. Have both batteries checked independent from one another. Check all battery cable and end (all ends) for tightness and corrosion. Only time iI witnessed this in person was when my brother-in-law's 95 had a battery internally short. On glowplugs, the WTS light is only a reminder to wait. Even when it turns off you can wait longer for the plugs to keep heating (they will stay on for up to 2 minutes). Cycling doesn't really do much. You can also plug in the block heater for a couple of hours prior to starting to see if that helps. The cord is usually stuffed under the driver's side battery area.

To check the glowplug relay (GPR), measure the voltage drop across the GPR's large terminals. While the GPR is active (up to 1.5 to 2 minutes after the key is turned to Wait-to-Start) put your meter leads on the large terminals (one lead on one large terminal and the other lead on the other large terminal). This measures how much voltage is being "lost" across the relay. A reading of 0.3V or more indicates a bad relay. Also, check the relay’s control wires (smaller wires) disconnected from the relay for battery voltage at the Red/Light Green striped wire and ground at the Purple/Orange striped wire (check both when the key is turned to Wait-to-Start). If the relay is bad, most folks will recommend a White-Rodgers 586-902 as a better replacement.

Cheers!
 

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Welcome! Normally when that relay starts "chattering", it's a low voltage issue. Have both batteries checked independent from one another. Check all battery cable and end (all ends) for tightness and corrosion. Only time iI witnessed this in person was when my brother-in-law's 95 had a battery internally short. On glowplugs, the WTS light is only a reminder to wait. Even when it turns off you can wait longer for the plugs to keep heating (they will stay on for up to 2 minutes). Cycling doesn't really do much. You can also plug in the block heater for a couple of hours prior to starting to see if that helps. The cord is usually stuffed under the driver's side battery area.

To check the glowplug relay (GPR), measure the voltage drop across the GPR's large terminals. While the GPR is active (up to 1.5 to 2 minutes after the key is turned to Wait-to-Start) put your meter leads on the large terminals (one lead on one large terminal and the other lead on the other large terminal). This measures how much voltage is being "lost" across the relay. A reading of 0.3V or more indicates a bad relay. Also, check the relay’s control wires (smaller wires) disconnected from the relay for battery voltage at the Red/Light Green striped wire and ground at the Purple/Orange striped wire (check both when the key is turned to Wait-to-Start). If the relay is bad, most folks will recommend a White-Rodgers 586-902 as a better replacement.

Cheers!
I just wanted to say thank you Patrick Feeley for sharing your knowledge. Your words have really helped me in times when I was puzzled over something going on in my truck. It's good to know there are people like you that are willing to share their knowledge with, let just say not too knowledgeable about diesel engine, people like myself.(y).
 
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