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2014 F-350 SRW CCLB 6.7L
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for a little input or guidance. Maybe someone can tag me in a similar forum if one has already been posted. (New to forums so I apologize in advance.)

Truck Info - 2014 6.7l CCLB SRW - Only mod is DPF/EGR Delete and runs on stock tune.

400 Miles from home, 80 MPH on the interstate, no load
I got a check engine light and display on the dash something similar to "EXHAUST TEMPERATURE HIGH SERVICE IMMEDIATELY".

Series of events over the next 120 seconds:
-Opened up EZLYNK and already had fuel parameters on gauges.
The actual rail pressure was roughly half of the desired so I started to exit the interstate.
-As soon as I get to around 20MPH the truck dies.
-I coast to a parking spot and open the door and smell strong diesel. I look under the truck and near the driver side fuel is dripping from all over the front axle and area where the front driveshaft connects.
-I inspect the fuel rails and find the driver side rail has a significant amount on the front half.

CODES: P228E - PCM-Fuel Pressure Regulator A Exceeded Learning Limits - Too Low
P0087 - PCM-Fuel Rail / System Pressure - Too Low Bank 1

Out of curiousity I attempt to crank the engine.
Actual Rail Pressure goes to roughly 1,000 PSI
When I cycled the key a few times into the ON position, I did notice what sounded like a possible hissing near the left fuel rail.
I did no further trouble shooting as I was minutes away from a job site and its my last day of a long haul work trip. Just trying to get home and see my family!

Has anyone experienced anything similar (the large fuel leak along with cp4 failure symptoms)?

The truck is being towed the next 400 miles and will be dropping off at my house.

-Thanks in advance! Any input is greatly appreciated. If anyone is interested, I will continue to update this post with pictures and details.
 

· Master Tech
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The obvious answer is that you have a fuel leak in the high-pressure system though a leak in the low-pressure side can do this too. Take care of that, clear the codes and re-evaluate. The hissing noise on the left frame rail is your fuel pump. If it is noisier than usual it's likely due to air in the system - in most instances if fuel can leak out, air can get in. Inspect the high-pressure system including the return line from each injector and the low side. I should think a leak that size would be obvious. The low-pressure sensor located near the secondary fuel filter is a semi-common failure.
 

· Master Tech
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Prior to troubleshooting the leak, would it be wise to dive straight to the pump and check the valve for metal? Certainly I’ll be going there regardless.
No, not yet. A fuel leak could cause your concern and the codes. Again... start with the obvious and re-evaluate. Of course, if the concern remains after repairing the fuel leak the diagnostics may indeed lead you to removing the VCV for inspection but that would not be my first inclination given the circumstances. It also depends on WHAT you find leaking.

Were there any EGT sensor codes to go with the excessive exhaust temperature warning message?
 

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2014 F-350 SRW CCLB 6.7L
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No, not yet. A fuel leak could cause your concern and the codes. Again... start with the obvious and re-evaluate. Of course, if the concern remains after repairing the fuel leak the diagnostics may indeed lead you to removing the VCV for inspection but that would not be my first inclination given the circumstances. It also depends on WHAT you find leaking.

Were there any EGT sensor codes to go with the excessive exhaust temperature warning message?
No. No codes for anything temp or exhaust related or any other codes at all but I did find other forums with folks saying that display came along with low fuel rail pressure symptoms. I’m assuming some sort of common practice with tunes.
Copy that. I’ll find where I’m leaking from and post back on Sunday.
 

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2014 F-350 SRW CCLB 6.7L
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just updating this post!

I got the truck home but time has gotten away from me and I still haven't had a chance to dig into it.
I am headed out of town for Thanksgiving but once I am back I will start diagnosing and updating this post along the way!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I finally tore into the truck.

I could not replicate the fuel leak. I tried priming several times with low side pressure around 58 PSI. Then tried cranking several times to get something to leak.
I pulled the valve at the rear driver side fuel rail. There was obvious metal flake. The picture is after I had wiped it with my finger so quite a bit of the debris had ran off.
Automotive tire Nickel Gas Household hardware Coin

I knew now that I had a full tear down so I started ripping all the pieces out.
Only two copper washers stayed on the injectors and it was pretty difficult to fish the one out of the driver side rear injector tube without dropping it in the valves lol.
This is what the valve on the top of the pump looked like
Automotive tire Household hardware Rim Gas Cylinder

Here is a shot inside the driver side fuel rail from the back. Massive clumps of metal.
Automotive tire Bicycle part Rim Gas Household hardware

At this point I have no clue where the fuel leak came from. The driver side front half of the fuel rail was soaked with fuel. The other odd thing was that the valley was filled about 4" deep in coolant and fuel. There was a debris line higher than the pump shaft from how high the fluid in the valley had been.
I found during removal that one of the thermostat gaskets were damaged.
I assume this is where the majority of the coolant has been leaking from but I plan to replace the turbo coolant lines during this.
Gear Automotive tire Bicycle part Crankset Rim


Inside the valve port on the CP4 it was filled with metal.
Fluid Water Liquid Gas Circle
 

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2014 F-350 SRW CCLB 6.7L
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have every piece of the fuel system removed at this point aside from the low side lines, low side pump, and tank.
I plan to replace the line sets and pump but if anyone has any tips or tricks on cleaning the tank that would be much appreciated!
Also, I have no idea what the root cause is. I did take a fuel sample from the tank but didn't appear to have any water or anything in it. I definitely have not put any DEF in the tank :)
My best guess is whatever fuel leak I had, apparently only showed itself under serious pressure, caused the pump to work harder to attempt to meet desired and it simply couldnt.
I couldnt get a picture but after removing the pistons on the pump, I can see that the shaft or cam piece (don't know the proper terminology) is marred and scraped all to hell and it feels like there is large broken metal pieces inside of the rotating assembly.
 

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2014 F-350 SRW CCLB 6.7L
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hey guys,
I almost have my truck put back together from the CP4 glitter bomb. I have a few questions...

1. Do you flush / clean and re use the low pressure lines?
(Aside from the tank and sending unit, these are the only part of the entire fuel system I have not replaced)
I cleaned the tank and sending unit thoroughly and feel confident in that. All the low pressure lines concern me though. I flowed degreaser through the lines in both directions, then flushed them with water for a couple minutes in both directions, then use compressed air to blow out the o rings in the quick disconnect fittings and blew air through the lines. Then I blasted the lines both directions and fittings with brake cleaner to try and free up any metal particles in them. Then blasted them with compressed air for a while to try and dry them as much as possible. Let the lines hang for a few hours.

2. Does anyone know a part number or have a link to the heat shields that go on both sides of the engine? (I think they were behind the fuel rails)
Mine got pretty destroyed coming out.

TIA

PS - the repair hasn't been bad at all for my first time doing it. Keeping everything organized and clean and its been straight forward so far.
 

· Master Tech
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You performed the repair/flush backward and incorrectly.

All remaining low pressure fuel lines can be reused if no physical damage is present.
  1. Drain fuel tank completely by removing the tank and cleaning it. Section 310-01. (Dispose of contaminated fuel in accordance with local laws and regulations.)
  2. Fill fuel tank with fresh, clean, good quality diesel fuel.
  3. Using a suitable container, drain the Fuel Conditioning Module of any residual liquids.
  4. Remove the front (inlet) Fuel Cooler Line that feeds fuel to the cooler from the engine.
  5. Place the open end of the line into a suitable container.
  6. Use Scan Tool Active Commands or cycle the ignition to “RUN” to activate the low pressure fuel pump to flush the lines.
  7. Allow the fuel pump to run for 3 minutes or until approximately 3 gallons of fuel has been flushed through the system.
  8. Reconnect the front (inlet) Fuel Cooler Line.
  9. Replace both primary and secondary fuel filters.
  10. After the flush is completed, replace the following high pressure fuel system components:
    • Fuel Injection Pump
    • Engine mounted high pressure fuel lines
    • Both high pressure Fuel Rails
    • Eight Fuel Injectors
    • Fuel Injector Return Hose Assembly
    • Fuel delivery Pressure Switch (located on the engine low pressure line near the secondary fuel filter)
 

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2014 F-350 SRW CCLB 6.7L
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You performed the repair/flush backward and incorrectly.

All remaining low pressure fuel lines can be reused if no physical damage is present.
  1. Drain fuel tank completely by removing the tank and cleaning it. Section 310-01. (Dispose of contaminated fuel in accordance with local laws and regulations.)
  2. Fill fuel tank with fresh, clean, good quality diesel fuel.
  3. Using a suitable container, drain the Fuel Conditioning Module of any residual liquids.
  4. Remove the front (inlet) Fuel Cooler Line that feeds fuel to the cooler from the engine.
  5. Place the open end of the line into a suitable container.
  6. Use Scan Tool Active Commands or cycle the ignition to “RUN” to activate the low pressure fuel pump to flush the lines.
  7. Allow the fuel pump to run for 3 minutes or until approximately 3 gallons of fuel has been flushed through the system.
  8. Reconnect the front (inlet) Fuel Cooler Line.
  9. Replace both primary and secondary fuel filters.
  10. After the flush is completed, replace the following high pressure fuel system components:
    • Fuel Injection Pump
    • Engine mounted high pressure fuel lines
    • Both high pressure Fuel Rails
    • Eight Fuel Injectors
    • Fuel Injector Return Hose Assembly
    • Fuel delivery Pressure Switch (located on the engine low pressure line near the secondary fuel filter)
Sorry for not being specific, I removed all these components from the truck and separated them before cleaning and have not reinstalled them. Can you explain what you mean by the repair/flush being done backward and incorrectly?
Those instructions look way less thorough than the cleaning that I performed.

Oh I see where you have highlighted #10. I don't see why it would make any difference if I have already installed all the new high pressure components if I am not flowing any fuel through them.
 

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Hi,
I have been considering installing a DPK. I have not installed one yet because I feel the chance of failure is very low. Can you give some background information leading up to the failure?
Truck year and miles?
have you owned it since new?
is it stock?
do you use a fuel additive?

thank you
 

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2014 F-350 SRW CCLB 6.7L
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hi,
I have been considering installing a DPK. I have not installed one yet because I feel the chance of failure is very low. Can you give some background information leading up to the failure?
Truck year and miles?
have you owned it since new?
is it stock?
do you use a fuel additive?

thank you
Check my previous post.
 

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2014 F-350 SRW CCLB 6.7L
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16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Update:
Got the truck back up and running today. Everything seems to be acting right so far. Haven’t got the tires back on so I haven’t driven it anywhere or got it too high above idle. I’ll update once I give her the stress test.
Not a bad repair just takes a fair amount of time.
Fingers crossed for no issues.
 
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